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January 18, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-18

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, January 18, 2013

michigandaily.com

CAMPUS SPEAKER
AKPsi hosts
lecture on
. complexity
of euro crisis

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con. professor macroeconomic issue of the
European Union subsequently
plains fragility snowballed into another in the
early 2000s. He explained that
.ms from 1970s moving back to a post-World
War II economy, from 1950 to
By ALEXANDRA 1975, European nations enjoyed
MONDALEK a stable economic expansion
Daily StaffReporter and a rapid increase in living
standards.
just how fragile is the As oil crises of the mid-to-
Economics Prof. William late 1970s shook the foundation
as says that depends on of many European economies,
youthink "fragile" means. Adams said it was becoming
idents from a variety of increasingly difficult to main-
mic disciplines gathered tain generous labor contractsin
Ford School's Annenberg the face of growing structural
orium of on Thursday for unemploymentand civil unrest.
s' presentation on the Each of the problems result-
lexity of the euro crisis ing from the 2008 recession and
ts potential implications. the beginning of the sovereign
vent was co-sponsored by debt crisis in 2009 exacerbated
lpha Kappa Psi business longstanding issues in Europe's
conomics fraternity and monetary and fiscal regime,
nternational Policy Stu- Adams said. The unemploy-
Association; ment rate of the most affected
ams gave his assessment countries such as Greece and
e situation in a pseudo- Spain hovers doggedly around
al framework - complete 25 percent, more than three
diagnoses, prescriptions times that of the United States.
rognoses for the Europe- While the EU maintains a
onomy. united monetary policy, each
ams outlined the rich nation maintains an indepen-
ical context of how one See EURO, Page 3

Michigan Basketball defeated Minnesota on the road 83-75 in Minneapolis Thursday night.
roars to road win

Hardaway Jr. and
Burke combine'
for 39 as Blue
bounces back
By COLLEEN THOMAS
DailyStaff Reporter
MINNEAPOLIS - Just six
minutes into the first half, Min-
nesota's primary ball handler,
Andre Hollins, picked up his sec-
ond foul and headed to the bench.

Almost immediately, the Golden
Gophers began to cough up the
ball.
Michigan took those freebies
and had no issue pushing the ball
up the court to finish its posses-
sions in an emphatic dunk or a
Tim Hardaway Jr. 3-pointer.
Ten first-half turnovers for
No. 9 Minnesota (3-2 Big Ten,
15-3 overall) led to 22 fast-break
points for the Wolverines in their
83-75 victory over the Golden
Gophers, a facet of their game
that was almost absent in Sun-
day's road loss to Ohio State.

"I think it was important for
us to get out in transition," said
sophomore guard Trey Burke.
"We knew in the first half against
Ohio State, we were kind of too
stagnant, we played too much
half-court offense. When we
get out in
transition, MICHIGAN 83
it allows us MINNESOTA 75
to open the
game up (and) it allows us to go
on runs. We have a lot of players
that can run the court, and it's
important forus to do that."
But Michigan's transition

game tapered off in the second
half and the Golden Gophers
crept back in the game. Despite
good shooting and scoring 24
points off turnovers, the Wolver-
ines - who led by as many as 19
inthe secondhalf- slowed down
its offense and let Minnesota
execute its defense and rebound
effectively to make Thursday's
top-ten showdown a close game
in "The Barn."
The way the Wolverines (4-1,
17-1) played Thursday night
against another ranked confer-
See WIN, Page 3

TECHNOLOGY
Linux founder
talks open-source

Students gather at the MPowered Start-up career fair held at Pierpont Commons on Thursday. '''' " "'"I '' """'
MPowered expands
fair beyond start-ups

Stallman chides
Apple, Google for
privacy policies
By AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily News Editor
Richard Stallman doesn't
have a cell phone.
He doesn't', buy DVDs,
doesn't use Windows or Mac
OS laptops and doesn't use
closed-source commercial soft-
ware. He is not on Facebook
and has never owned a car.
But he isn't a Luddite or
computer illiterate. In fact, he
loves technology and the Inter-
net. At one point, he hoped the
Internet would stop censorship
around the world.
Stallman is the founder and
presidentofthe advocacygroup
Free Software Foundation and
was one of the main creators of
the open-source GNU/Linux
operating system. Speaking for
two hours at a packed Stamps
Auditorium, Stallman lament-
ed the prevalence of online
tracking and the rise of closed-
source programs.
"Digital technology allows
surveillance that Stalin can
only dream of," Stallman said.

Stallman advocates for open-
source software where users
are given access and encour-
aged to modify the source code
of programs they use. He dis-
tinguished between "free as in
freedom" software and zero-
cost software, saying that they
do not necessarily go hand-
in-hand. He told the audience
that closed-source programs
- programs that don't allow
this access - could harbor mal-
ware and "backdoor" exploits
because users can't review it's
code.
Wearing a red polo, brown
pants and no shoes, he attacked
companies including Apple,
Google, Microsoft, Adobe,
Amazon and Rovio, the cre-
ators of Angry Birds. Stallman
claimed these companies col-
lected copious amounts of data,
and some of their software
allowed malicious programs to
be installed.
"You should never use the
Amazon swindle," Stallman
said to laughs. "The official
naise of that product isthe Kin-
dle. Kindle means to start a fire
which I think is meant to sug-
gest that its purpose is virtual
book burning."
Stallman told the audi-
See LINUX, Page 3

STATE GOVERNMENT
Committee
to decide
if Detroit
needs EFM
Review team
will make
recommendation
mid-Febuary
By ANGELA SON
Daily StaffReporter
After Republican Gov. Rick
Snyder signed the emergency
financial manager law on Dec.
18, focus again turned to the
review team that has been look-
ing at Detroit's troubled financ-
es.
The team of six members,
including State Treasurer Andy
Dillon, has been meeting since
early December with city offi-
cials in order to determine
whether a financial emergency
exists in Detroit.
The review team is due to
issue its recommendation to
Snyder by mid-February. The
governor will make a decision
on whether or not to appoint
a financial manager to take
See DETROIT, Page 3

Tech, engineering
companies look for
student talent
By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily StaffReporter
Suit, tie and a 401(k) seem a
little staid?
The MPowered Start-up
Career Fair brought the Pier-
pont Commons and Duderstadt

Center to life Thursday, unit-
ing start-up companies and
students to learn about poten-
tial opportunities.
MPowered, a student orga-
nization focused on cultivating
entrepreneurship opportuni-
ties for University students,
has hosted the unique fair for
the past three years. Though
60 percent of the start-ups at
the fair were from the Ann
Arbor area, start-ups with
their headquarters in Detroit,

Chicago and California were
also present.
Engineering junior Brandon
Eagle, director of the fair, said
the main goal this year was to
expand the geographic and
technical diversity of compa-
nies present.
In the last two years, the
fair aimed solely to attract
students to 'start-ups, bypass-
ing large corporations. After
students expressed interest in
See MPOWERED, Page 3

Hail, hail
Stories of heartbreak and
heroism outweigh the
not-so-flattering truth.
PAGE 4

WEATHER HI: 44
TOMORROW LO: 20

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIII.,No. 60
02013 TheMichigan Daily
michigondoily~com

NEWS.. .......... .....2, SPORTS..................6
OPINION....................4 SUDUKO................... 3
ARTS S.......................... 5 CLASSIFIE D.............6

4

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