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January 17, 2013 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-17

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w

2A - Thursday, January 17, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Alumni Profile: Seth Gold

94it fiiigan Dagmy
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com rmgrein@michigandaily.com

University alum Seth Gold
prides himself on his work
ethic. He's a fourth-gener-
ation pawnbroker and star
of truTV network's reality
show, Hardcore Pawn.
Seth has a lot to show for
his hard work: Hardcore
Pawn amassed more than
two million views for its sea-
son premiere, breaking the
standing record.
Gold became involved
in his family business after
graduating from the Univer-
sity in 2003. Originally on
the pre-medicine track, he
altered his path after gradu-
ation to become his father's
business partner at Ameri-

can Jewelry and Loan.
With 10 years of experi-
ence, there's not much that
Gold hasn't seen at the busi-
ness, which is located on
Greenfield Road in Detroit.
At the shop, customers
bring in merchandise either
to sell or to pawn, which
means they obtain a cash
loan in exchange for the
merchandise as collateral.
However, as simple as this
process may seem, transac-
tions become heated when
customers don't think they
are getting a good deal.
On the show, customers
are notorious for their argu-
ments and negotiations. The

Since graduating in 2003, University alum Seth Gold became reality
television sensation on his show, Hardcore Pawn.
CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Latte larceny Off the books Feminist films MLK lecture

WHERE: Neuroscience
Hospital
WHEN: Tuesday at about
9:30 a.m.
WHAT: A coffee maker was
stolen from the third floor
sometime between January
first and seventh, University
Police reported. There are
currently no suspects.

WHERE: Pierpont
Commons
WHEN: Tuesday at about
8:10 a.m.
WHAT: An employee,
who has since resigned,
stole money from the cash
register, University Police
reported. The investigation
is ongoing.

Courtside seat Now you see it,
'1

WHERE: Central Campus
Recreation Building
WHEN: Tuesday at about
9 p.m.
WHAT: Phones and
personal property of two
students were stolen from
a bag under a bench in the
basketball gym, University
Police reported. The bag is
believed to have been taken
between 8:45 and 9 n.m.

now you don t

WHAT: University of
Wisconsin Professor and
Vice Provost, Patrice Petro
facilitates a discussion on
feminist film theory from
1989 until today.
WHO: Screen Arts &
Cultures
WHEN: Today at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: North Quad,
room 2255
Musical
Performance
WHAT: Indie composer
and singer, Gabriel Kahane
performs with an mix of
traditional instruments. He
will be playing songs from
his latest album, Where are
the Arms along with other
compositions.
WHO: University Musical
Society
WHEN: Today at 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Arthur Miller
Theater

WHAT: English Dept. fac-
ulty memebers Sara Blair
and Joshua Miller host a
panel discussing the exhibi-
tion, "Claiming Citizenship:
African Americans and
New Deal Photograhy."
WHO: Institute for
Research on Women and
Gender
WHEN: Today at 4 p.m.
WHERE: Lane Hall, room
2239
CORRECTIONS
" An article in the Jan.
16 edition of the Daily
('Auto executive talks
future ofelectric ears")
misstated the the date
when Carlos Ghosn
spoke. The date was
Tuesday, not Wednesday.
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

most ridiculous experience,
Gold said, was when a guy
tried to pawn a glass eye.
"I popped it out of his
head," Gold said.
Since Gold has always
been a self-proclaimed
"Michigan guy," Wolver-
ine memorabilia frequently
appears on the show. In the
first season a Michigan hel-
met sat behind him in his
office, and Gold still goes to
games at the Big House.
Gold said he doesn't have
time for many hobbies. He
once tweeted, "Trying this
sleep thing. Let's see how it
goes."
-KAITLINZURDOSKY
T H REE T HINGS YOU
SH OULD KNOW TODAY
Instead of wrapping
traditional pieces of
cloth around their feet
when wearing boots, soldiers
of the Russian military have
made the transition to socks,
according to NBC News.
This is part is part of ongoing
Russian military reform.
Red Beard Press, a
publishing company
operating out of the
Neutral Zone in Ann Arbor,
was started. and is still run
primarily by a group of local
high-school students and
mentors.
SEETHE B-SIDE, INSIDE
In the UK and Ireland,
horse DNA has been
found in beef burgers
sold in supermarkets, the
Daily Mail reported. Ire-
land's food safety authority,
FSAI, has recalled the prod-
ucts containing horsemeat
from purveyors.

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Matthew Slovin ManagingEditor mjsltvin@michigandaily.com
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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
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WHERE: Duderstadt
Building
WHEN: Tuesday at 11:35
p.m.
WHAT: A laptop was
reportedly stolen from the
lower level when the owner
left it unattended to get a
document from a printer,
University Police renorted.

I

0

H EY YOU!
JOIN THE DAILY!.
COME TO OUR MASS MEETINGS:
MON., JAN. 21 AT 7:30 P.M.
THURS., JAN. 24 AT 7:30 PM.
ALL MEETINGS ARE AT
420 MAYNARD STREET

Students embark on Kenyan trip

X
fea
ai
Six
seleci
in Ju
start-
progr
MPov
Th
of
by
organ
stude
The
Mich
to fac
group

Powered trip Eenya Project Director
Lucy Zhao, a Business and LSA
tures individual sophomore, said the project
promotes University students
nd community to become entrepreneurs by
providing hands-on business
projects experience they wouldn't
usually receive in a classroom.
By ANGELA SON Zhao said the main goals
Daily StaffReporter of the project are to provide
social entrepreneurship
students have been opportunities for the
ted to go to Kithoka, Kenya University students and assist
ne as part of a three-week Kenyan students develop their
up entrepreneurship own businesses.
am sponsored by "Traditional entrepreneurship
wered. would put profit as the ultimate
e Kenya trip is one goal, and you have to earn
10 projects directed as much money as possible,"
MPowered, a student Zhao said. "(With social
ization that fosters entrepreneurship) theymeasure
nt entrepreneurship. how many lives I've changed."
group works through Zhao initiated the project
iKen, a local non-profit, last year with the help of
ilitate the project on the Medical School Prof. Daniel
nd. Clauw.

"I felt like we were missing
reaching out to a huge part of
the University of Michigan
population," Zhao said.
Clauw said in an interview
that other components of the
trip include participating in
clinicalresearch, administering
health surveys and teaching in
local schools.
In the second launch of
the program this year, Zhao
said MPowered has added a
two-hour weekly preparation
course where students will
learn entrepreneurial skills this
semester, the Swahili language
and Kenyan culture.
"This year we're adding an
entrepreneurship-through-
camp kind of idea plus cultural
exposure, so in this semester
the team and I are going to be
meeting with entrepreneurship
professors, entrepreneurs,
we're going to take Swahili

lessons - just getting more
prepared," Zhao said.
Last year MPowered
raised $3,500 through grants,
scholarships and support from
alumni, which served the five
participants for two weeks in
Kenya, according to Zhao.
The six students selected to
go to Kenya come from many
schools within the University.
Business and Architecture
sophomore Carolyn Phillip
said she decided to apply for
the trip because it provides a
unique way of giving back to
the visiting community.
Phillip plans to launch her
aquaponics business that uses
fish to purify water, which
then cultivates plants and
vegetables.
"I'm really excited. It's a
little overwhelming because
it's the first time I've done
anythinglike this."

TechArb startup creates new fuel injector

"'""""""""""-i

PicoSpray aims
to make small
engines more
eco-friendly
By ARIANA ASSAF
Daily StaffReporter
Two engineering students
have created a new method of
fuel injection to make small
engines more environmentally
friendly.
Engineering graduate
student Lihang Nong and
engineering alum Brett Merkel
began work on PicoSpray in the
University's TechArb startup
lab in November 2010.
The PicoSpray electronic
fuel injection device sprays
fuel mist into a small engine's
combustion chamber, a process
which ims to replace the more
traditional but less efficient
carburetor in most engines.
The team is targeting the

product for small engine
manufacturers. In the past,
the high cost of adding an
electronic fuel injection
system has dissuaded small
engine manufacturers from
includingthem in their already
costly engines.
However, , PicoSpray
advertises its ability to
decrease both an . engine's
emissions and cost by using
fewer parts than traditional
fuel injection devices. This
makes them easier to install
and saves about 70 percent of
the cost in mechanical parts,
Nong explained.
Even individual buyers are
becoming interested in fuel
injectors like PicoSpray to
better the longevity and overall
function of various small
engines.
Merkel, who also founded
the student-run Supermileage
team, which focuses on
"designing the most fuel-
efficient internal combustion

concept carin North America,"
was already interested in
energy efficient transportation
"that aligned with PicoSpray,"
he said.
Merkel joined Nong in
September 2011 for the Clean.
Energy Venture Challenge
that year. They also entered
their design in iStart's Clean
Energy Challenge 2012 aimed
at discovering and rewarding
clean energy business startups.
They made it to the final round
of the competition in February
2012 and won third place.
PicoSpray's page on the
iStart website points out that
small engines, such as those in
motorcycles, lawnmowers and
generators create much more
pollution worldwide than
large engines, such as those in
cars.
PicoSpray's creators are
confident that increased fuel
emission regulations, both in
the United States and abroad,
will lead to small engine

manufacturer's need for a more
efficient fuel injector option.
"New motorcycles produced
in countries such as Taiwan
and Thailand are already
mostly fuel injected," said
Nong.
A similar phenomenon took
place 20 years ago, when almost
all cars became fuel injected
over a 10-year period as a result
of increased fuel prices and
stricter government emission
standards.
The two intend to put
together a larger team to mass-
produce their product, but this
will take a greater amount of
time and money. Once this is
done, they expect to sell about
5,000 devices at $200 to $300
each in the first year.
Merkel graduated last April
and is now employed at Stryker,
a medical technology company.
Since then, PicoSpray has hired
two new full time workery,
and they're working on getting
their design patented.

0

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