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January 17, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-17

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1.

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, January 17, 2013

michigandaily.com

CAMPUS LIVING
East Quad to
offer inclusive
living spaces
upon opening

NICHOLAS WILLIAMS/daily
Republican Guv. Rick Snyder delivered his third State of the State address, which did riot include references to recently passed right-to-work legislation.
Gov hopef Pine eS c

Open Housing
Initiative works
with 'U' to create
new program
By AARON GUGGENHEIM
Daily StaffReporter
Almost four years after LSA
senior Amy Navvab successfully
pushed the Open Housing Ini-
tiative, University Housing has
announced plans to start a gen-
der-inclusive living community in
East Quad Residence Hall for the
fall 2013 semester.
The Gender Inclusive Living.
Experience will allow students
who identity as transgender, gen-
der non-conforming or as allies to
choose a roommate of any gender
and live with a community of like-
minded individuals.
University Housing spokesman
Peter Logan said Housing would

reserve 12 beds for the communi-
ty next fall and would work with
the Spectrum Center to review
applications to live in GILE.
Navvab, chairwoman of the
Open Housing Initiative, said she
became involved when she real-
ized that studdnts who did not
identify with the gender binary
and who wanted alternative
housing options could only find
a comfortable living situation in
Northwood Housing.
"It was something that was
unjust," Navvab said.
After work with both the Open
Housing Initiative and the Spec-
trum Center Advocacy Board,
students submitted a petition to
University Housing to explore
more options for gender inclusive
housing in 2008.
Jackie Simpson, the direc-
tor of the Spectrum Center;said
the petition sparked a conversa-
tion between University Housing
and student groups like Central
See INCLUSIVE, Page SA

State of the State building replete with Michigan
State Police officers to hear Sny-
addresses Mich. der deliver his third State of the
State address.
economic recovery Snyder, a University alum
who delivered the 2011 Spring
By STEVE ZOSKI Commencement speech, said he
Daily StaffReporter remains committed to reinvent-
ing Michigan through tough
As hundreds of warmly decision-making and sacrifices
dressed protesters filled the that will leave a better state for
steps of the Michigan State future generations.
Capitol Building Wednesday He said the 2000s were a
night, legislators gathered in a disparaging , decade where

a shrinking Michigan lost
750,000 jobs. He said his
administration has responded
to such dark days and as a result
have seen higher incomes, an
increasing population and an
improving housing market.
Snyder recalled a chart he
has in his office displaying a
history of Michigan's percent-
age of the U.S. income. He told
legislators he laments that the
number went down from 5.25
percent to 2.5 percent between

1965 and 2009 but added that
his policies have put the state
on a new path.
"Our role in the national
economy reduced by more than
half in thoseyears,but it started
to come up again," Snyder said.
"We've been coming up the last
two or three years, but I don't
want us to go back down again
and just say it was another blip."
Snyder said he's committed
to keeping the state growing
See SPEECH, Page SA

PUBLIC HEALTH
Deadly flu season hits
United States hard
Influenza H3 leads this flu season has proven to be Eden Wells, clinical associate
more life-threatening than any professor of epidemiology,
to four deaths in other flu in recent U.S. history, said to the circulating flu is not
. claiming 20 deaths among considered to be a pandemic,
Michigan children as of Jan. 14, four of though such an event is always

SHE DIDN'T START THE FIRE

1
1

which occurred in Michigan.
By MICHELLE The flu vaccination, which
GILLINGHAM is in short supply nationwide,
Daily StaffReporter covers three strains: Influenza
AH3N2, AH1N1 and Influenza
nny noses, muffled coughs B. Another strain of the B virus
chy pains are back - flu has been found in Michigan - it
n has arrived on campus. is not, however, affected by the
minated by Influenza H3, vaccine.

a possibility.
"Right now we wouldn't
expect the strains that are
currently circulating that
are covered by the vaccine
to cause us any problems in
terms of a pandemic," Wells
said. "Influenza always has a
See FLU, Page5A

Rur
and a
seasot
Dot

SUSTAINABILITY
* Energy-saving competition
ends with S. Quad victory

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily
LSA freshman Cristina Shoffner analyzes sand and leaves for the University's Biological Station Wednesday at
Nadelhoffer Laboratory to better understand soil degradation caused by forest fires.
ONLINE EDUCATION
Public Health prof. leverages social
media through Youu be channel

Six-week program
encourages dorms
to unplug
By STEPHANIE SHENOUDA
Daily StaffReporter
After ' much anticipation,
the results of the 2012 Kill-a-
Watt competition have been
announced, and the students
of South Quad Residence Hall
came out on top.
Kill-a-Watt is a six-week

campus-wide effort to reduce
the amount of energy used in
residence halls. The University
has saved thousands of dollars
as a result of the energy con-
served through this competi-
tion, which began in' winter
2010.
LSA freshman Lania Robin-
son, a South Quad community
adviser, said members of the
residence staff sent out e-mails
and posted flyers to spread the
word and encourage students
to participate.
"I personally just tried to be

a little more conscious of the
energy that I used," Robinson
said. "I would unplug my lap-
top if it was fully charged and
turn off-my lights and my desk
lamp."'
Robinson said although the
contest format didn't person-
ally motivate her to partici-
pate, she felt it created needed
awareness about energy con-
servation.
LSA junior Tara Wells, a
South Quad resident adviser,
said she encouraged her resi-
See COMPETITION, Page SA

In six months,
page has 30,000
video views
By JENNIFERCALFAS
Daily StaffReporter
A piano sets a beat as a hand
holding a marker appears in
front of a blank whiteboard. A

voice comes in.
"Are the Olympics bad for
your health?" it asks.
The voice belongs to Andrew
Maynard, the director of the
University's Risk Science Center
and professor at the School of
Public Health. In the first video
in his YouTube series "Risk
Bites," Maynard narrates the
five riskiest sports in the Olym-
pics.

Nearly six months after the
video's creation, Maynard has
more than 800 subscribers and
more than 30,000 overall video
views on his YouTube chan-
nel. Maynard said he hopes his
series will make his expertise in
risk science available for public
access.
"I was intrigued to discover
when there was some way of
See YOUTUBE, Page SA

WEATHER HI: 34
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