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March 25, 2013 - Image 2

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2A - Monday, March 25, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A~~~ - ody ac 5 03TeMchgnDiy-mciadiyo

C--CHOKE HOLD

9ic 10dchian Daily
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in chief Business Manager
734-41a-41t5 ext. t252 734-418-4115 est. t24t
anweinergmichigandailyconm rmgrein@michigandailycom

Graduate Student Council forms
75 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK 50 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK 15 YEARS AGO THIS
(MARCH 30,1938): (MARCH 31,1963): WEEK (MARCH 23,1998):

The first graduate students'
council was formed at the
Michigan Union. This would be
the first organized meeting of
graduate students of any school
in the nation. The purpose of its
initiation was to involve gradu-
ate students in more aspects of
University affairs.
University officials Herbert
Weisinger, Stuart Portner and
Ellsworth Raymond were elect-
ed to be the three chairmen of
the main divisions of the new
organization: housing, intel-
lectual coordination, and social
and athletic committees.

Michigan's men gymnasts
took their first NCAA title with
a total of 129 points; Southern
Illinois University came in sec-
ond, finishing with 73 points.
Michigan took first place five
times and tied for first in anoth-
er event. Captain Gil Larose
managed to win three indi-
vidual categories, including the
all-around, the long-horse and
the high bar. Other notable ath-
letes were Arno Lascari, taking
first on the parallel bars; Gary
Erwin, taking first on the tram-
poline; and Mike Henderson,
tying for first place for the floor
exercise round.

After the University's Board
of Regents approved advertise-
ments deemed by some to be
racist and sexist earlier in the
month, University President
Robben Fleming cracked down
on his disciplinary policies and
emphasized the urgency for
consequential punishments.
One of the steps the Univer-
sity took to combat the negative
image of the prior advertise-
ments among local high schools
was to place new ads in the
school's newspapers.
- CHRISTYSONG

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University alum Andres Domenech and tngineering
and Ross senior Brennan Haase, members of Godai
Ninpo, practice their craft.

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Justice is blind Self-education Shale gas

WHERE: Kellogg
Eye Center
WHEN: Thursday at about
6:55 p.m.
WHAT: Between 12:30
p.m. and 1:30 p.m., six
eyeglass frames were
reportedly stolen from the
Optical Shop, University
Police reported. There are
currently no suspects.
Radiating
trouble
WHERE: Chemistry Build-
ing
WHEN: Thursday at about
5:05 p.m.
WHAT: Repairs were
provided to a stairwell
radiator that leaked
water to the lower level,
University Police reported.
rnm e mnpr e ,. ,,med

WHERE: Briarwood
M-Care
WHEN: Thursday at about
12:30 p.m.
WHAT: Between 8 a.m.
and 8:30 a.m., a textbook
was reportedly stolen
from a clinic, University
Police reported. There are
currently no suspects.

lecture

Gym, tan,
shopping spree
WHERE: Central Campus
Recreation Building
WHEN: Thursday at about
8:20 p.m.
WHAT: A debit card
and driver's license were
reportedly stolen from the
locker room, University
Poli,.e ,.n,.i-d-

WHAT: As part of the Erb
Colloquium, Barry Rabe of
the Ford School will give a
talk on Pennsylvania's shale
gas policy development.
WHO: Erb Institute/Ross
Business School
WHEN: Today at 12 p.m.
WHERE: Ross School
of Business
ASP history
roundtable
WHAT: The Armenian
Studies Program will host a
discussion on the entwined
histories of Armenians,
Kurds and Turks.
Co-sponsored by the UCLA
history department.
WHO: Armenian Studies
Program
WHEN: Today at 4 p.m.
WHERE: School of Social
Work Building, room 1636

Leadership
labyrinth
WHAT: Kathy McDonagh
and Nancy Paris will dis-
cuss the Leadership Laby-
rinth, an alternative career
development pathway.
WHO: School of Public
Health
WHEN: Today at 5 p.m.
WHERE: School of Public
Health Building
Gaming tourny
WHAT: This silent
tournament will highlight
motion-based games such as
the XBOX 360's Fruit Ninja
Kinect and the Playstation
2 Dance Pad's Dance Dance
Revolution X
WHO: Computer & Video
Game Archive
WHEN: March 25th-April
6th from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
WHERE: Duderstadt
Center, Room B474

V 6 1NGSU
Awonder Liang of Madi-
son, Wis. became the
youngest chess master
in the United States Satur-
day, the Dayton Daily News
reported. The nine-year-old
has been playing chess for
almost five years, and thinks
it's "a cool game."
The Michigan hockey
team lost to Notre
Dame in the CCHA
Championship game, ending
its streak of 22-straight
appearances in the NCAA
Tournament.
>, FOR MORE, SEE INSIDE
three-year-old child's
t-shirt reading "I am
a bomb" is causing an
uproar in France, The Wash-
ington Post reported. The
child is named Jihad and
was born on Sept. 11. His
mother is on trial and faces
criminal charges.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Matthew Slovin ManagingEditor mjslovin@michigandaily.com
AdamRubenfireManagingNewsEditor arube@michigandaily.com
SENIORNEWSEDITORS:AliciaAdamczykKatieBurkeAustenHufford, PeterShahin,
K.C.Wassman, Taylor Wizner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Molly Block, Jennifer Calfas, Aaron Guggenheim, Sam
Gringlas, DanielleStoppelmann,SteveZoski
Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial Page Editors
SENIOREDITORIALPAGE EDITORS:JesseKlein,SarahSkaluba,DerekWolfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Sharik Bashir, Daniel Wang
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand ManagingSports Editors sportseditors@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Steven Braid, Michael Laurila, Stephen Nesbitt, Colleen
Thomas,LizVukelich,DanielWasserman
AsSISNTSPRS OS : DanielFeldman,aGregGarno, Raiat Khare, Liz Nagle,
Kayla Upadhyaya ManagingArts Editor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: ElliotAlpern, Brianne Johnson, John Lynch, Anna Sadovskaya
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Sean Czarnecki, Carlina Duan, Gibson Johns, Max Radin,
Kendall Russ, Akshay Seth, Katie Steen, Steven Tweedie
Adam Glanzman and
Terra Molengraff Managing PhototEditors photo@michigandaily.com
SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS: TeresaMathew,Todd Needle
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:KatherinePekata,PaulSherman,AdamSchnitzer
Kristen Cleghorn and
Nick CruzManaging Design Editors design@michigandaily.com
HaleyGoldberg MagoEioeEditoe ry statement@michigandaily.com
oDEnTYMAGAZINE EDITOPe ercy
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien CopyChiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Jennie Coleman, Kelly McLauglin
BUSINESS STAFF
Ashley Karadsheh AssociateBusiness Manager
SeanJackson sales Manager
SophieGreenbaum Production Manager
Meryl Hulteng National Account Manager
The Michigan Daily OSSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan.One copy is available free of charge
to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2.Subscriptions for
fall term, starting in September via U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is
$115, yearlong (September through April) is $195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced
subscriptionrate.On-campussubscriptionsforfaltermare$35.Subscriptionsmustbeprepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

0
6
6

Debt Wizard app aids
University law stuents

Dance Marathon club
to host week of events

Mobile application
displays ways to pay
off law school debt
By HILLARY CRAWFORD
For theDaily
Michigan Law students
recently gained access to the
new "Debt Wizard" mobile appli-
cation, which makes financial
uncertainties a little bit clearerby
calculating debt and suggesting

ways to pay it off.
The app, released last month,
combines projected costs of the
Law School along with expected
annual salaries after graduation,
among other aspects, to predict
and approximate future debt.
Sarah Zearfoss, an assistant
Law dean, introduced the appli-
cation to the studentbody.
"The Debt Wizard helps to
fulfill our obligation-speaking
both generally as an institution of
higher education and specifically
as a public university -to provide

ffinceton
Review
MCAT - LSAT - GMAT - GRE
-Small Classes
-Expert Instructors
-Free Extra Help
-Online Student Center
-Satisfaction Guaranteed"
800-2Review 800-273-8439
PrlncenRevlew.com
US I

some tools to grapple with the
considerable complexities," Zear-
foss said inastatement.
Debt Wizard presents 11,000
different repayment routes to
inform students of their payback
options. Students can calculate
their costs simply by inputting
their expected level of annual sal-
ary,geographicalmarket,debtlevel
and type of employment. In turn,
the app shows the monthly income
needed to balance debt, housing
costs and other living expenses.
The resulting debt calculation
is based upon the four most wide-
ly used federal payment plans by
law students and the National
Association for Law Placement's
salary levels. The geographic
markets, in contrast, are defined
by national trends and include big
cities across the nation.
Zearfoss said the app was ini-
tially a project for her office, but
many other units contributed as
well.
One of the contributors, Kon-
stantin Voyk, who works in IT at
the Law School, said he worked
on developing a visual design that
would display calculation results
in a simplified, accessible way.
"The main challenge was com-
ing up with how we can visualize
it because it's a lot of data," Voyk
said. "We want to show financial
information to students, and the
new generation isveryvisual."
On the prospect of expansion
plans, Voyk added the app devel-
opment team is currently think-
ing about expanding the number
of cities and regions to allow for
more choices and accuracy.
Student feedhack has been
encouraging, Zearfoss said.
Alyce Thompson, a student at
both the Law School and School
of Urban Planning, said she
thinks the tool can be useful in a
universal way.
"The Debt Wizard is a great
tool for informing prospec-
tive students on the realities of
debt they'll be facing when they
graduate," Thompson said. She
added that its especially helpful
for understanding costs of dif-
ferent cities.

M
v
ber
Nc
danc
what
Univ
DMU
two
begir
Weep
M
mem
the o
dent:
oppo
for p
apy.
fund
mont
C.S.
Voigt
in An
"v
tree-
mart
ingt
by in
Jasm
direc
are
progi
out u
Mott
utor.
In

[arathon Bound in the marathon will be support-
ing and advertising for the event
Veek to feature throughout the upcoming week.
From those who will stand dur-
nefit dinners, fun ing class to show support, to
people bucketing for the cause,
By AUSTIN REED Marathon Bound Week will
For theDaily showcase what to look forward
to not only during the event, but
o sleeping. No sitting. Just during the next two weeks as
ing for 30 hours. That's well.
Dance Marathon at the "Chances are youhave a friend
ersity of Michigan, or who is involved in Dance Mara-
JM, will be doing in just thon," Injejikian said. "Support
weeks as Monday marks the them, ask if they need any help,
nning of Marathon Bound donate to their dancer accounts,
k. try to give them anything you
arathon Bound Week gives can to make sure they're able to
bers who are involved in be involved."
:rganization, as well as stu- LSA senior Hannah Cottrell,
s and the community, an the co-community outreach
rtunity to raise awareness chair for DMUM, said Univer-
ediatric rehabilitationther- sity students can expect to see
Every penny of DMUM's Dance Marathon advertisements
raising is donated to Beau- and events all over campus -
Hospital in Royal Oak, and specifically in Mason Hall and
Mott Children's and Von the Chemistry Building - dur-
tlander Women's Hospital ing Marathon Bound Week, and
tn Arbor. much more during the marathon
Ve fund programs like itself.
climbing therapies, or "During the marathon, what
ial arts therapies or danc- campus can look forward to is
herapies that aren't funded just a lot of fun," Cottrell said.
tsurance," Business senior "(People) can look forward to the
ine Injejikian, executive whole campus coming together
tor of DMUM, said. "We for one cause. We're all there to
the sole funder of these join together for the kids."
rams at Beaumont - with- "For the kids" is an integral
ts they would not exist. At part of the organization, and
, we are the main contrib- this idea sits at the core of all
DMUM fundraising events.
jejikian said people involved The group's motto "Something

for everyone; Everyone for the
kids" speaks volumes toexactly
why, for 30 hours straight, over
1,000 students stand - or rath-
er, dance - together.
"There are things that doc-
tors told these kids that they'd
never be allowed to do - fly
in an airplane because the
noise bothers (them) or climb
a tree house because (they're)
in a wheelchair," Engineering
senior Jaclyn Harwood, the
other co-community outreach
chair for DMUM, said. "But we
have therapies that allow these
kids to do (those things), and
that changes their lives."
To conclude the 30-hour-long
event, the last four hours are
dedicatedto a visitor push called
"Stand With Us," in which Inje-
jikian said the final fundraising
amount will be revealed. She
encourages everyone to take a
small part of their Sunday to see
just how DMUM affects thou-
sands of children.
"Every dollar that we raise is
for those kids," Injejikian said.
"It's all about finding that inner
drive to make life better for
somebody. All kids deserve the
chance to dance."
DMUM will hold numerous
events throughout the week:
On Tuesday, there will be a
benefit dinner at Mia Za's; on
Wednesday, there will be a
Pizza House Trivia night; and
on Saturday, Yost Ice Arena
will host a skate night.

I
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