100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 2013 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2013-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - Friday, February 1, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Friday, February 1, 2013 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY: TUESDAY: WEDNESDAY: THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
This Week in History Professor Profiles In Other Ivory Towers Alumni Profiles Photos ofthe We

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREW WEINER RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief 'Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com rmgrein@michigandaily.com

LEFT The Head and the Heart
perform at the 36th Ann Arbor
Folk Festival at Hill Auditorium
on Saturday, January 26th.
(RUBY WALLAU/Daily)
TOP RIGHT Maya Crosman, a
freshmar in the School or Art
arnd Design, take time out of a
busy week to paint.
(ALLISON FARRAND/Daily)
BOTTOM RIGHT Performers
came to sing and dance at
the Shirely Verrett Award
ceremony in Stamps
Auditorium at the Waigreens
Drama Center. The winner of
the award was Robin Wilson, an
Associate Professor of Dance.
The award is presented to a
faculty member whose work
has supported the soccess of
women in creative fields who
come from diverse cultural and
racial backgrounds.
(PATRICK BARRON/Daily)

4

i
I

Newsroom
734-418-415 opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
Arts Section
arts@miehigandaily.com
Sports Section
sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales
display@michigandaily.com
Online Sales
onlineads@michigandaily.com

News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
letters to the Editor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaily.com
Finance
finance@michigandaily.com

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

iTheft
WHERE: Mott Children's
Hospital
WHEN: Wednesday around
12:00 p.m.
WHAT: An iPhone was
reported stolen after
being left in a second-floor
bathroom earlier in the day,
University Police reported.
There are no suspects.

Late night
WHERE: Shapiro
Undergraduate Library
WHEN: Thursday around
2:10 a.m.
WHAT: A 35-year-old man
was found sleeping in Shap-
iro and refused to leave. He
was arrested then released,
University Police reported.

Traditonal
gardens
WHAT: This exhibition
will feature photos of Afri-
can American folk gardens
taken by Vaughn Sills.
WHO: Matthaei Botanical
Gardens and Nichols
Aboretum
WHEN: Today at 8:00 a.m.
WHERE: Matthaei

Three strikes Fender benderI
and you're out WHERE:1120 Catherine arkWebster
WHERE: 1100 Baits WHEN: Thursday around reading series
6:50 a~m

Holocaust hero
WHAT: This exhibits the
story of Raoul Wallenberg, a
Swedish University gradu-
ate who saved thousands of
Jews during the Holocaust.
WHO: Campus
Information Centers
WHEN: Today at 8:00 a.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union,
Art Lounge
CORRECTIONS:
* In an article entitled
"Students compete to solve
U.S. crisis" in a January
31 edition of the Daily
misstated the objective
of the competition. The
competition was meant
to generate campaigns,
not solutions.
* Please report any
errors in the Daily
to corrections@
michigandaily.com

According to the Tele-
graph, Russian Prime
Minister Vladmir Putin
is hiring Boyz II Men in order
to increase fertility in Russia.
The Moscow Times reported
that the band will be playing
in hopes of furthering Putin's
recent fertility campaign.
The Michigan men's
basketball team will
face No. 3 Indiana on
Saturday night. The outcome
will likely have major impli-
cations for both the NCAA
Tournament seeds and the
Big Ten title picture.
Egyptian President
Muhammad Mursi
Mursi's senior aide said
earlier this week that the
story of the Holocaust was
concocted by America in
order to justify their destruc-
tion of the Axis powers in
World War II.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Matthew Slovin Managing Editor mjslovin@michigandaily.com
Adam Rubenfire ManagingNews Editor arube@michigandaily.com
SCsNORNEWS o ORS s Alicia Adamczyk,KatieBurke, Austen Hufford, Peter Shahin,
K.C.Wma,aylor mizner
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Molly Block, Jennifer Calfas, Aaron Guggenheim, Sam
Gringlas, Danielle Stoppelmann, Steve Zoski
Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts EditorialtPagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Jesse Klein,Sarah Skaluba, DerekWolfe
ASSISTANTEDITORIALPAGEEDITORS:SharikBashir,DanielWang
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand Managing Sports Editorssportseditors@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Steven Braid, Michael Laurila, Stephen Nesbitt, Colleen
Thomas, Liz Vukelich, Daniel Wasserman
SSSTNSRTS ITORS aniel Feldman, Greg Garno, Rajat Khare, Liz Nagle,
Kayla Upadhyaya ManagingArtsEditor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Elliot Alpern, Brianne Johnson, John Lynch, Anna Sadovskaya
ASSTANT ARTS EDITORS: Sean Czarnecki, Carlina Duan, Max Radin, Akshay Seth,
Katie SteenStevenTweei
Adam Glanzman and
Terra Molengraff ManagingPhoto Editors photo@michigandaily.com
SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS: Teresa Mathew, Todd Needle'
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: Katherine Pekala, Paul Sherman, Adam Schnitzer
Kristen Cleghornand
Nick Cruz Managing Design Editors design@michigandailycom
HaleyGoldberg MagEznPeditor statement@michigandaily.com
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien copy chiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIORCOPYEDITORS:JennieColeman,KellyMcLauglin
BUSINESSSTAF
Ashley Karadsheh Associate Business Manager
Sean Jackson Sales Manager
Sophie Greenbaum Production Manager
Meryl Hulteng National AccountManager
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
QUy Vo circulation Manage
The Michigan Daily (IsSN 0745-967) is published Mondaylthrough Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge
to allreaders.Additionalcopiesmayibepickedupat theDaily'soffice for$2.Subscriptionsfor
fall term, starting in September,cviaU.S. mail are $110. Winter term (Januarythrough April) is
$1Is.yearlons(September through April)is $195.University affiliates are subject to a reduced.
subscriptionrate.On-campussubscriptionsaforfall termare$35. Subscriptionsmust be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

a

6
0

WHEN: Wednesday at
around 1:10 p.m.
WHAT: A visitor was
kicked out of the Earl V.
Moore building, University
Police reported. The visi-
tor had been given several
warnings to leave the build-
ing previously.

WHAT: Two vehicles were
involved in an accident on
Catherine street, University
Police reported. There were
no injuries and damage to
the vehicles is unknown.

WHAT:The Mark Webster
Reading Series features two
Masters of Fine Arts stu-
dents, introduced by their
peers, who will read selec-
tions from their work in
both fiction and poetry.
WHO: University of
Michigan Museum of Art
WHEN: Today at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: University of
Michigan Museum of Art

Middle-school teen
shot by fellow student !.

0

m
fir

ATL
opened
Thursd
a 14-ye
an arm
school
away, p
Mult
the co
School
about 1
was h
George
afterm
minorc
The
"alert,
ing" tc
pital,
Carlos
System

[ultiple shots Simpson said the teen had been
discharged from the hospital
red in school's Thursday night. Campos said
charges against the shooter were
courtyard pending.
Police swarmed the school of
ANTA (AP) - A student about 400 students after reports
fire at his middle school of the shooting while a crowd of
ay afternoon, wounding anxious parents gathered in the
ar-old in the neck before streets, awaiting word on their
ied officer working at the children. Students were kept at
was able to get the gun the locked-down school for more
olice said. than two hours before being dis-
tiple shots were fired in missed.
urtyard of Price Middle Investigators believe the
just south of downtown shooting was not random
:50p.m. and the one boy and that something occurred
it, Atlanta Police Chief between the two students that
Turner said. In the may have led to it.
ath, a teacher received Schools Superintendent Erroll
cutsahe said. Davis said the school does have
wounded boy was taken metal detectors.
conscious and breath- "The obvious question is how
o Grady Memorial Hos- did this get past a metal detec-
said police spokesman tor?" Davis asked about the gun.
Campos. Grady Heath "That's something we do not
i Spokeswoman Denise know yet.".

olmo 000

The armed resource officer
who took the gun away was off-
duty and at the school, but police
didn't release details on him or
whether he is regularly at Price.
Since 20 children and six adults
were shot to death at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Connecti-
cut in December, calls for armed
officers in every school have res-
onated across the country.
Hours after the Atlanta shoot-
ing,
several school buses loaded
with children pulled away from
the school and stopped in front
of a church about a half-block
away. Parents tried boarding the
buses. Police who initially tried
to stop the parents, relented and
screamed, "Let them off!" about
the students.
James Bolton was at work
when his sister called saying a
teen had been shot at his son's
school and was in the crowd as
parents began swarming the
SIR OR
MADAM:
JOIN THE NOBLE
RANKS OF THE
GLORIOUS DAILY
NOW OFFERING
POSITIONS TO
COMMONERS
GOD SAVE THE
QUEEN!
for more infO, go to:
www.michigandaily.com
/join-us

10 month rule of
Islamists ends in
beleaguered city
TIMBUKTU, Mali (AP) - On
the morning French comman-
dos parachuted onto the sand
just north of this storied city and
ended 10 months of Islamic rule,
Hawi Traore folded up her veil.
On the next day, she wore heels.
On the day after, she put on her
sparkly earrings, got her hair
braided and tried her mother's
perfume.
Finally on Thursday, the
12-year-old girl dared to dance
in the streets, celebrating free-
dom from the draconias rules
that were imposed by the' al-
Qaida-linked militants on this
desert capital for much of the
past year.
Four days since French spe-
cial forces liberated Timbuktu,
there is a growing sense of
freedom - particularly among
women. The speed with which
women have claimed back their
freedom underscores one of
the advantages the French hold
against an elusive enemy on
unforgiving terrain: The popu-
lation here has long practiced a
moderate Islam rather than the

extremism of the militants.
Although Timbuktu has long
been a code word for the ends
of the earth, until recently its
women led a relatively mod-
ern existence, where they were
not required to be covered and
could socialize with men. That
changed abruptly last year, when
radical Islamists seized control
of the northern half of Mali in
the chaos after a coup in the dis-
tant capital.
When they first arrived,
Hawi, a tall, fast-talking, sassy
preteen girl, was just learn-
ing how to put on makeup. She
learned the hard way to wear the
toungou, the word for veil in the
Songhai language. Her slender
arm still bears the scar left'by
the whip of the Islamic police,
her punishment for not properly
coveringup.
Her once-free life became
increasingly restricted, as did
that of her sisters and friends.
The Islamists showed no
mercy, beating everyone from
pregnant women to grand-
mothers to 9-year-old girls who
weren't fully covered. Even
talking to a brother on the front
stoop of a woman's own home
could get her in trouble.
Smoking, drinking and music
were banned. So was playing

soccer. The worst punishment
was reserved for love outside the
rules, and an unmarried couple
who had two children out of
wedlock was stoned to death in
one northern Malian town.
Fatouma Traore lives on
Street No. 415 in Timbuktu, the
road that runs directly in front of
the building where the Islamic
Tribunal operated in what was
once a luxury, boutique hotel.
A leaflet left in the dirt in the
courtyard set out eight rules for
how women should wear the veil.
Rule No. 1 is that the fabric
should cover the entire body.
Rule No. 2 is that it can't be
transparent. Rule No. 3 is that it
needs to be colorless. And finally,
Rule No. 8 states that a woman
should not perfume herself after
puttingit on.
"We even bought a veil for
this baby," said the 21-year-old
Traore, picking up her 1-year-
old niece and hoisting her on one
hip. "Even if you are wearing the
veil and it happens to slip off and
you are trying to put it back on,
they hit you."
The French military launched
an intervention to oust the
Islamists from power in northern
MalionJan.11,andrapidlyforced
thleir retreat from the major cities
in less than three weeks.

Women dance openly in front of a photographer as they walk along a street in Timbuktu, Mall, after the French lberation.
French army returns.
freedom- to Ti-m-buktu.,

0
0

f

f I' flP5 A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan