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October 30, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-10-30

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

michigandaily.com

NHLLOCKOUT
- Report: NHL
will cancel
outdoor game

Winter Classic
scheduled for
New Year's Day at
Michigan Stadium
By MATT SLOVIN
and HALEY GOLDBERG
Daily Sports Editor and
Daily News Editor
The National Hockey League
plans to cancel its annual Winter
Classic on Thursday, ESPN.com
reported Monday.
The Detroit Red Wings and the
Toronto Maple Leafs are sched-
uled to play outdoors at Michi-
gan Stadium on New Year's Day.
The game is expected to be avic-
tim of the ongoing labor dispute
between the NHL and its player's
union, which has resulted in the
cancellation of the NHL season
up to this point.
But as labor negotiations
between the league and the Play-
ers' Association have come to a
standstill, it doesn't appear there
will be a resolution soon.
"I'm just hoping it's not can-
celled," said Michigan hockey
coach Red Berenson. "That'll be

a world-class event for the sport
of hockey."
David Ablauf, the University's
associate athletic director, said .
the Athletic Department is mov-
ing forward with its preparations
for the game.
"Any decision would be
announced by the NHL so we,
as an athletic department, are
currently still continuing our
planning," Ablauf said by phone
Monday evening. "We're still
moving in that direction, and
any final decision one way or the
other is going to have to come
from the NHL."
Crain's Detroit Business also
reported last week that the Hock-
eytown Winter Festival will be
cancelled alongside the cancel-
lation of the Winter Classic. The
festival - a weeklong celebration
of hockey in Detroit - includes
the Great Lakes Invitational, an
annual tournament held each
December.
This season, the Great Lakes
Invitational was to be held at
Comerica Park, but it will move
back to its typical venue, Joe
Louis Arena, if the NHL can-
cels the Winter Classic, Crain's
reported.
See NHL, Page 3

ADAM GLANZMAN/Daily
Ann tomney speaks al a tepublican rally in Grand tapids on Monday October 29, 2012
AnnRomney brings-
camaig toW. M ich.,

GOP ticket focuses
on conservative-
leaning west side of
the state
By CSANDRA BALFOUR.
For the Daily
GRAND RAPIDS - In the
final sprint to Election Day,
Ann Romney took the stage at

the Romney campaign's office
here Monday afternoon to
rally for her husband, Republi-
can presidential nominee Mitt
Romney, and showcase her
Michigan roots.
Romney was received by
raucous applause at the office,
which was filled with GOP
supporters eager to hear Rom-
ney share her husband's mes-
sage that though the clock is
ticking, there is still time "to
save the country." With recent

polls indicating that President
Barack Obama has a slight lead
in Michigan, Romney implored
the crowd to help the campaign
bridge the gap in the days lead-
ing up to Nov. 6.
Romney, a native of Bloom-
field Hills, emphasized her
ties to Michigan during her
address, at one point holding
up her hand in the quintessen-
tial symbol of the Mitten State.
Earlier in the day, she was in
Traverse City and spent Sun-

day night at Comerica Park in
Detroit watching the Detroit
Tigers play in the World Series.
"You can't believe all the
people I run into across the
country who show me their
hand. All the fingers, thank
goodness," Romney joked.
She reassured the crowd that
Mitt Romney not only embod-
ies the qualities necessary
for a strong president, which
he demonstrated during the
See ROMNEY, Page 3

CAMPUS SECURITY
Coleman:
Security
issues not
'unusual'
At SACUA, president
addresses new
Division of Public
Safety and Security
By AUSTEN HUFFORD
Daily StaffReporter
University President Mary Sue
Coleman publicly addressed the
recent reorganization of campus
security organizations into the Divi-
sion of Public Safety and Security
for the first time Monday. Speaking
at the weekly meeting of the Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs, the University's lead fac-
ulty governing body in the Fleming
Administration building Monday.
Coleman said she was pleased
with the reaction to the reorga-
nization but also downplayed the
uniqueness of the University's secu-
rity problems.
"One of the things (the Margolis
external audit report) did uncover
was some long standing issues, and I
understand from colleagues around
See COLEMAN, Page 7

STUDYING ABROAD
University gets
most Fulbrights

4

Zingerman's staff members prepare for this week's opening of the 10,000 ft. expansion.
ingerman's expansion to
boast additional 10,0 .

New building will
improve customer
experience, Ann
Arbor deli says
By HALEY GOLDBERG
Daily News Editor
Like corned beef nestled
between two toasted pieces of
rye bread, the newest addition
to the Zingerman's Deli hopes
to add more meat to the eatery
in the form of additional seat-
ing, a newer, larger kitchen
and a more modern facility.
After almost two years
of construction, which was

approved by the Ann Arbor
Historic District Commis-
sion in 2011, the new additions
to the eatery will be open to
Zingerman's customers and
staff this week.
In a tour of the new expan-
sion, Lori Saginaw, Zing Look
and Feel consultant and wife
of Zingerman's co-founder
Paul Saginaw, said the new
expansion - which is a little
more than 10,000 square feet
in additional space - will give
the Zingerman's eatery the
environment it has always
needed to operate efficiently.
"We've outgrown every-
thing. And that was why this
was so necessary," Saginaw
said. "It isn't just because we

didn't have enough places to
seat people, but it was because
that little, tiny kitchen was
the only kitchen. And every-
thing that the kitchen needed
had to be put outside on the
campus in remote areas, so
people who are cooking had to
go outside the building to get
more potatoes."
Saginaw said the long-
needed expansion could not
happen in past years because
the company did not own
more space to expand. The
chance to expand came after
a house next to the eatery
was severely damaged in
a 2006 fire, an incident in
which a Zingerman's sand-
See ZINGERMAN'S, Page 7

Fo
and t
the
that
were
studs
other
2012-
Th
stude
this
schoc
came
stude
rank(
The L
spot
in 20
2011.
Th
spoo
ment
catio.
was
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U.S.
efitin
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Ne
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more

0 'U' students and scholars from across the
world have received Fulbright
awarded grants since the program was
created 66 years ago, about
prestigious 44,000 of which are students
from the United States.
scholarships The 12-member J. William
Fulbright Foreign Scholarship
By DANIELLE Board oversees the adminis-
STOPPELMANN tration and organization of the
Daily StaffReporter program in the United States
and abroad, and selects the
r the third straight year, grant-receiving applicants.
he sixth time since 2005, Kelly Peckens, an academic
University said Monday program officer and Fulbright
more Fulbright grants program adviser for the Uni-
awarded to University versity, said Fulbright scholar-
aots than those at any ship recipients at the University
U.S. institution for the benefit greatly from exposure
-2013 academic year. to various cultures and the
ere were 40 University enhancement of their careers
ants who received grants or professional degrees.
fall - a record for the "The goal of the Fulbright
ol. Harvard University program for U.S. students is to
in second place with 31 promote mutual understanding
ants and Brown University between the people of the U.S.
ed third with 29 students. and people of other countries,"
University also held the top Peckens said in an e-mail inter-
for most students accepted view.
05, 2007, 2008, 2010 and Peckens said applicants
submit individual academic
ie Fulbright program, projects and proposals, and stu-
sored by the U.S. Depart- dents can seek guidance from
of State's Bureau of Edu- University Fulbright advisers
nal and Cultural Affairs, or from the University's Inter-
established in 1946 as a national Institute.
ant exchange program for She added she is happy
and foreign students, ben- with how many students were
ig more than 155 countries accepted into the program this
dwide. year.
arly 1,700 students "We are thrilled with the
ved grants this year, and University's continued success
than 300,000 students See FULBRIGHTS, Page 7

WEATHER HI: 45
TOMORROW LO: 39

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INDEX NEWS ................:........2A OPINION.....................4A
Vol. CXXiii, No. 36 AP NEWS....................2A SPORTS .................. 5A
©2012TheMichiganrDaily SODOKU.....................3A CLASSIFIEDS...............6 A
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