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March 07, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-03-07

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

michigandaily.com

SUPER TUESDAY
Romney
claims slim
win in Ohio

I svrsJLMULEuAs/rroaily
Dennis Lee (left) and Charles Sulzer (right) members of The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family and Property protest against President
Barack Obama's health care reforms.
STATE GOVERNMENT
State House votes in favor
omedical amnesty policy

Santorum wins
in three states,
Gingrich takes Ga.
By ANDREW SCHULMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney narrowly beat out former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum
in the key swing state of Ohio yes-
terday as Republicans in 10 states
took to the polls as the contest for
the Republican presidential nomi-
nation continued.
In the split night of the Super
Tuesday contests, Romney won five
states and Santorum won three,
extending Romney's lead in del-
egateswhile alsoreinvigoratingthe
campaigns of Santorum and former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
According to University professors,
last night's contests denied any
of the candidates the chance for a
decisive turn in the race, and the
results could prolong the contest
even longer.
Romney scored decisive victo-
ries in Massachusetts - where he
formerly served as governor - Vir-
ginia, Vermont and Idaho. Santo-
rum won North Dakota, Tennessee
and Oklahoma, while in Ohio - a
so-called bellwether state due to its
close political divisions - Romney

defeated Santorum by a margin of
38 percent to 37 percent.
Results in Alaska were not yet
reported as of 2:30 a.m.
At a rally in Steubenville, Ohio,
Santorum said he was "ready to win
across this country."
"It's clear. We've won races all
over this country against the odds,"
Santorum said.
"When they
thought, 'Oh, OK,
he's finally fin-
ished,' we keep
coming back. We Mil
are in this thing."
Santorum appeared to gain
momentum after three consecutive
victories in Colorado, Missouri and
Minnesota last month, which was
stifled following losses in Maine,
Michigan, Arizona and Washing-
ton. Last night's wins are his first
since his successes in early Febru-
ary.
Michael Heaney, an assistant
professor of political science, said
Santorum performed well and
regained some momentum from
Romney with his strong victories
in the South and his challenge to
Romney in Ohio.
"I'm not sure I'd call Santorum a
loser," Heaney said. "I mean, San-
torum looks quite strong. He per-
formed quite well in Ohio."
However, Heaney declared the
See ROMNEY, Page 2A

Only four prevent individuals under the
age of 21 from receiving Minor
legislators vote in Possession of Alcohol cita-
bl i tions for seeking medical atten-
against bill in tion for themselves or others
b while intoxicated was over-
bipartisan effort whelmingly passed in the Mich-
igan House of Representatives
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA yesterday in a vote of 105-4.
Daily StaffReporter The bill will which now
heads to the state Senate, was
A bill supporting medical sponsored by State Rep. Antho-
amnesty, a policy that would ny Forlini (R-Harrison Town-

ship). He said the bill is crucial
in potentially saving the lives of
underage drinkers in perilous
situations.
"This is a good bill to protect
young people," Forlini said in an
interview. "We don't want to see
anybody get hurt or die because
they fail to get help."
While similar bills to House
Bill 4393 have failed in the past,
Forlini said this bill is "much
more responsible," noting that

the legislation would require
that the parents of the under-
age drinker be notified of their
child's behavior.
"I thinl that's a critical dif-
ference right there," he said.
Forlini added that the legisla-
tion only provides amnesty in
cases of an emergency, unlike
past bills.
"The other bills, they didn't
have to have necessarily a
See POLICY, Page 3A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Hanlon, CSG
talk tuition
costs, budget

PRIZE DOG

Members discuss
resolutions on
budget, upcoming
election
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily StaffReporter
Central Student Govern-
ment welcomed University
Provost Philip Hanlon to
a joint session at its meet-
ing last night, where he
addressed the Assembly
and the University Council
on rising tuition and the
University's budget.
Hanlon joined Martha
Pollack, the University's
vice provost for academic
and budgetary affairs, in
clarifying confusion on
funding allocation at the
University in an effort
to increase transparency
on issues such as tuition
costs. CSG members also
discussed next month's
elections and passed reso-
lutions that increase its
budget for this semester

to provide funding for stu-
dents to attend a hearing
today in Cincinnati, which
will determine the consti-
tutionality of using race
as a factor in admissions
at universities around the
state.
Hanlon told CSG mem-
bers that he came to share
specifics of the budget sys-
tem, and express the desire
of University officials to
help finance the education
of students from around
the nation.
"(I want to) give (CSG)
an understanding of the
budget, an understanding
of what's driving costs up
- their cost of attendance,"
Hanlon said. "Let them
know we're concerned
about it, let them know
we're working on it."
Hanlon specifically
noted that many students
are unaware that the Uni-
versity of Michigan Health
System and the Athletic
Department are funded
separately from the Uni-
versity's academic depart-
See HANLON, Page 3A

'U' ADMINISTRATION
Social media
director does
more than
just tweet
Position created
to enhance the
University's online
presence
By ALICIA ADAMCYZK
Dairy StaffReporter
Jordan Miller, the University's newly
hired social media director, has some
big plans in mind for enhancing the
University's online presence.
Miller, who has worked on successful
projects with a variety of companies,
including Chevrolet and Kotex, said she
plans to overhaulthe University's online
image by creating a distinct personality
for the University that will develop into
an easily recognizable brand.
"If you see a video from Apple, you
know that's Apple," Miller said. "I
would like to see the same thing for the
University of Michigan, that you see a
video, and it's a professor or a lecture
or a visiting researcher (and) you know
that that's a University of Michigan
video."
The 31-year-old said a common mis-
conception about her new position is
See SOCIAL MEDIA, Page 3A

Tank the chiuaua explores the shelves of books at Red Shoes, an arts and crafts store on S. Ashley. See the complete
photo story in The Statement on page 8B.
SIUD E N1 AC1T1IVISM
Students face-off with Adidas rep.

Group engages in
terse debate over
laid-off workers
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
Daily StaffReporter
In a tense half-hour session
yesterday, University students
met with an Adidas representa-
tive in a forum focused on the
company's refusal to provide
severance to the 2,800 workers

who recently lost their jobs at a
factory in Indonesia.
The factory, PT Kizone, spe-
cifically manufactured apparel
adorned with the University's
logo and was closed down in
January 2011. Adidas holds a
$60 million contract with the
University. Though the compa-
ny declined to provide any pay
or benefits after the termination
of its workers, other companies
who also had a contract with
the factory, including Nike, paid
part of the workers' severance.

The students that met with the
representative expressed dis-
content with Adidas' refusal to
pay the severance, noting that
the act breached the code of
conduct that Adidas has with
University.
After the handful of students
in attendance finished asking
questions, the meeting conclud-
ed when Gregg Nebel, head of
social and environmental affairs
for Adidas in the Americas, was
asked to leave. LSA junior Mon-
See ADIDAS, Page 2A

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INDEX NEW S .........................2A CLASSIFIEDS...........A...6A
Vol CXXII,No.103 OPINION.....................4A SPORTS...............7A
©2lt2TheMichigan Daily ARTS.............5A THE STATEMENT..........1B
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