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January 18, 2012 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2012-01-18

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I e .icl igan 4:)at1

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, January 18,2012

THREE AND COUNTING

michigandailycom
INTERNET CENSORSHIP
Wikip edia
shuts down
in protest

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an]

ALDEN REISS/Daily
Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 10 points in the Michigan basketball team's 60-59 last-minute victory over Michigan State yesterday. It was Michigan's third
straight win in the rivalry. eFor full coverage see page 8.
Animal testing controversies
polarize re~osearchers, actvist

D
ON
1ev
W
famil
Ethic
mals'
camp

ebate persists treatment of animals, the bio-
medical research community
rer neccessary often remains quiet amid pub-
lic assaults on animal research.
el of regulation The imposition of stricter
laws and regulations governing
By JOSH QIAN research over the past 30 years
Daily StaffReporter signifies success for animal
rights groups, but many activ-
hile many people are ists believe vast improvements
iar with People for the stand to be made. Research-
al Treatment of Ani- ers contend, however, that the
high-profile advertising use of animals in research is a
aigns against the mis- necessary and humane way to

conduct studies and further
scientific efforts. Despite their
differing ideological views,
animal rights activists and
scientists at the University
and beyond say the ongoing
struggle is likely to continue
to impact future research ven-
tures.
Frankie Trull, president of
the Foundation for Biomedical
Research, said initial policy to
protect animal' research was
crafted in 1966. However, legis-

RESE ARCHl
lation was not clearly outlined
until 1985, when amendments
made to the Animal Welfare
Act set forth more comprehen-
sive regulations for the use of
lab animals.
"The- AWA set standards
with regard to their hous-
See TESTING, Page 3A

Tod
countr
of the
resour
Wik
duced
2001, d
of thei
to prot
Act ar
propos
House
online
Wik
by 401
and ha
users
accord
ductin,
awarer
vent th
SOP
PIPA b
federal
over wE

oogle and other duced to the House of Representa-
tives in October. Both acts seek to
ebsites contest protect the United States by pre-
venting copyright infringement
ti-piracy bills in and piracy on websites developed
by the public, like Wikipedia.
CongressThe House Judiciary Commit-
tee released a statement on Sun-
By DANIELLE day calling SOPA "a bill that stops
STOPPELMANN foreign online criminals from
For theDaily stealing and selling America's
intellectual property and keeping
ay, students around the the profits for themselves."
y woke up to find one School of Information Dean
ir Host prized Internet Jeff MacKie-Mason wrote in an
ces inaccessible. e-mail interview that the goal of
ipedia, the online user-pro- the blackout is to direct attention
encyclopedia developed in to the potential consequences of
lisabled the English version the proposed bills.
r site for a 24-hour period "(Wikipedia) wants to raise
est the Stop Online Piracy awareness of the harm they think
nd the Protect I.P. Act- the SOPA and PIPA laws would
:ed legislation in the U.S. cause and to encourage people to
and Senate aimed to fight be more active in opposingthe leg-
piracy. islation," MacKie-Mason wrote.
ipedia, which is utilized He added that he is unsure how
0 million visitors monthly much of an impact the "protest"
s about 100,000 consistent can really have.
that contribute content, "Whether it will be effective in
ing to its website, is con- motivating people to public action
g the protest to raise public is not so clear," he wrote. "But I
ness about the acts and pre- expect that there will be many,
eir passage. many calls and letters to legisla-
A, which supplements the tors asking them to oppose the
ill in the senate, grants the bills, and that this may have some
I government more control effect."

ebsite usage, and was intro-

See WIKIPEDIA, Page 3A

U PL ANNING
More morning,
Friday classes
to be scheduled

New plan will save
* the University
about $462 million
By ANDREW SCHULMAN
Daily StaffReporter
When Martha Pollack, the
University's vice provost for
academic and budgetary affairs,
told her son - a freshman at the
University - that the Univer-
sity's plan to restructure class
scheduling would likely result in
more early morning and Friday
classes, he groaned in response,
she said.
The plan to restructure the
class scheduling process was
initially announced at a meet-
ing of the Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs,
the University's leading faculty
governance body, meeting on
Jan. 9. Its goal is to reduce the
over-scheduling of classes dur-
ing peak hours - 10 a.m., 11 a.m.
and 1 p.m. - Monday through
Thursday by raising the number
of classes during non-peak hours
and on Fridays.
With implementation of the
new plan, the Office of the Regis-
WEATHER HI 29
TOMORROW LO: 14

trar will be able schedule classes
in available rooms after depart-
ments with priority have select-
ed their rooms - until5 p.m.
instead of noon.
In an interview last Thursday,
Pollack said she was concerned
that students may not be recep-
tive to the changes. Still, she said
she is excited about the plan, and
is confident students will recog-
nize that the advantages - like
fewer scheduling conflicts - are
worth the sacrifices or waking
up earlier or having Friday class.
"If we can spread out the
classes more, then it's actually
easier for students," she said.
Pollack also said the change
will allow for better utilization
of campus buildings and prevent
tuition increases by saving the
University about $462 million.
As more academic buildings,
like the Dennison Building, are
repurposed into office spaces,
the University would have had
to erect new buildings to com-
pensate for the loss of classroom
space until the policy was imple-
mented. The University will also
reclaim $18 million per year in
electricity costs from the repur-
posing of the buildings.
See SCHEDULED, Page 3A

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily
Recent reports show emergency response times ofnthe Ann Arbor Fire Department have not met national standards.
The AAFD averaged 120.3 seconds for fire responses. The national average was 80 seconds.
AAFD to re- evaluate operating
procedures following city.report

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Assembly
to vote
on three
proposals
Medical Amnesty,
tuition equality on
CSG's agenda for
next week
By GIACOMO BOLOGNA
DailyStaffReporter
At a sparsely attended meeting
last night, the Student Assembly
of the Central Student Govern-
ment proposed two resolutions
that could directly impact stu-
dents on campus.
Resolutions in support of
tuition equality and medical
amnesty - a program that would
prevent students from receiving
Minor in Possession of alcohol
charges when calling for medi-
cal attention for over-intoxicated
friends -were presented. The
Assembly also discussed a pro-
posal in support of groups in
opposition to federal legislation
that would expand the U.S. gov-
ernment's power in fighting ter-
rorism domestically.
CSG President DeAndree Wat-
See ASSEMBLY, Page 2A

Data to assist
councilmembers
balance city
budget
By TAYLOR WIZNER
Daily StaffReporter
The Ann Arbor Fire
Department is in the process
of evaluating a number of its

operating procedures in order
to better meet national safety
standards.
. On Jan. 12, the city of Ann
Arbor released a 114-page
report by the International
City/County Management
Association analyzingthe effi-
ciency ofthe AAFD. The report
concluded that response times
for the AAFD were slower
than the national average - at
120.3 seconds for fire response
and 121 seconds for Emergen-

cy Medical Service response
- failing to meet National
Fire Protection Association
standards of 80 seconds for
fire and 60 seconds for EMS.
According to City Coun-
cil member Sabra Briere
(D-Ward 1), the council com-
missioned the report - which
also analyzes organizational
methods, efficiency of vehi-
cles and compensation for
firefighters - in order to bet-
See AAFD, Page 2A

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