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November 14, 2011 - Image 2

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2A - Monday, November 14, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily~o

2A - Moday..Nvember4,0201.TheMhiganai ..,-m.chiendaiM, .com,

I

MONDAY: TUESDAY:
Other Towers This Week in History

WEDNESDAY:
Professor Profiles

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Campus Clubs Photos of the Week

(14 Ificligan DAM
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG ZACH YANCER
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-415 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com zyancer@michigandaily.com

A GLEE-FUL CONCERT

Zuckerberg recruits at Harvard

Facebook founder Mark
Zuckerberg returned to Har-
vard University - the school he
dropped out of when he started
developing Facebook - last
Monday to recruit new employ-
ees for his company, according
to a Nov. 8 Associated Press
article.
Wearing a sweatshirt and
jeans, Zuckerberg held a press
conference outside of Lamont
Library surrounded by students
and the public, the AP report-
ed. He spoke about the future
of Facebook and his plans for
expanding the company and
recruiting new talent.
"The next five or 10 years are
going to be about all the differ-

ent products and industries that
can be rethought," Zuckerberg
told the audience, according to
the AP.
OCCUPY PROTESTERS AT
BERKELEY ARRESTED
Forty protesters at Occupy
Cal Day of Action at the Univer-
sity of California-Berkeley have
been arrested since the event
started last Wednesday, accord-
ing to a Nov. 10 article in The
Daily Californian.
On Wednesday, police hit
protesters with batons, causing
"minor injuries" for protesters
and police officers, The Daily
Californian reported.

EARLY APPLICATIONS
FLOOD PRINCETON
Princeton University is cur-
rently dealing with a signifi-
cant influx of applicants to its
newly reinstated early decision
admission program, according
to a Nov. 10 New York Times
article.
When the application dead-
line passed on Nov. 1, Princeton
received 3,547 applications,
about three times the number
of current freshmen, the article
reported. Now, regular admis-
sions will continue accepting
applications.
-PAIGE PEARCY

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6
0

MCKNZIE BEREZIN/Daily
The Friars perform at the Glee Club a capella concert in
Hill Auditorium on Saturday.

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Letter to
landfill
WHERE: West Quadrangle
Residence Hall
WHEN: Thursday at about
8:40 a.m.
WHAT: Three pieces of
mail addressed to students
were thrown away by
an unknown subject,
University Police reported.
The disposed pieces of mail
were opened.

Rude with food
WHERE: University
Hospital
WHEN: Thursday at about
1:05 p.m.
WHAT: A male not
affiliated with the
University was caught
stealing food from the
cafeteria and responded
by throwing food at staff,
University Police reported.
The man was escorted out.

Seminar on
positive thinking
WHAT: Students will be
taught how to identify
problematic thought
patterns and target anxiety
in a session called "Stinkin'
Thinkin'."
WHO: Counseling and
Psychological Services
WHEN: Today at 2 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union,
room 3100

Macchi-out-o Couch abuse Climate talk

Free HIV tests
WHAT: An event called
"Thankful That I Know"
will provide free and
anonymous HIV testing to
students.
WHO: Spectrum Center
WHEN: Today at 6 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union,
room 3200
Orchestra
performance
WHAT: The University
Symphony Orchestra will
perform four pieces led
by conducting students
of University Music Prof.
Kenneth Kiesler.
WHO: School of Music,
Theatre & Dance
WHEN: Today at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Hill Auditorium
CORRECTIONS
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

Parents are ordering
lollipops pre-sucked
by children infected
with the chicken pox to
give to their kids, CNN
reported. The parents hope
to use the candy as a natural
alternative to giving children
the chicken pox vaccine.
Michigan defensive
coordinator Greg Mat-
tison was emotional
while addressing the media
after Michigan's 31-14 win
over Illinois, claiming his
men played like a "Michigan
defense."
g FOR MORE, SEE SPORTSMONDAY,
INSIDE
SceneTap, a new smart
phone application,
scans bar crowds and
provides information on the
average age and gender ratio
of a group, The New York
Times reported.

EDITORIAL STAFF
NickSpar ManagingEditor nickspar@michigandaily.com
Nicole Aber ManagingNews Editor aber@michigandaity.com
SENO NEWSEDITORS:BethanyBiron,DylanCinti,CaitlinHuston,JosephLichterman,
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Haley Glatthorn, Claire Goscicki, Suzanne Jacobs, Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, PaigePearcy,AdamRubenfire, Kaitlin Williams
Michelle Dewittand opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emily Orley Editorial Page Editors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Aida Ali, Ashley Griesshammer, Andrew Weiner
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Harsha Nahata, Timothy Rabb
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Tim Rohan ManagingSportsEditors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, MichaelFlorek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Kevin
ASSSTNT SO SDITORS: Everett Cook, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt Slovin, Liz
Vukelich,DanieWasserman
Sharon Jacobs Managing Arts Editor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jacob Axelrad, CassieBalfour,Joe Cadagin,Emma Gase,
Proma Khosla, David Tao
Marissa McClainand photo@michigandaily.com
led Mach Managing PhototEditors
ASSISTANT PHOTOrEDIORSrnKirkland, Allison Kruske, Terra Moengraff,
A"na Schulte
Zach Bergson and design@michigandaily.com
Helen Lieblich Managing Design Editors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Anna Lein-Zielinski
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS:Kristi Begonja, Corinn Lewis
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BUSINESS STAFF
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Alexis Newton ProductionManager
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Connor Byrd Finance Manager
QUy VO Circulation Manager
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01

WHERE: North Campus
Research Complex
WHEN: Friday at about
9:05 a.m.
WHAT: Two coffee pots
and assorted food items
have recently gone missing,
University Police reported.
There are no suspects.

WHERE: Gerstacker
Building
WHEN: Friday at about
9:35 a.m.
WHAT: A couch in the
lobby was found torn and
had marks from a writing
utensil on it, University
Police reported. There are
no suspects.

WHAT: Edward Parson,
professor at the University
Law School, School of
Natural Resources and
School of Public Policy,
will discuss the global
challenges in addressing
climate change.
WHO: Center for
International &
Comparative Law
WHEN: Today at 4 p.m.
WHERE: Hutchins Hall,
room 116

MORE ONLINE Love CrimeNotes? Sharefthem with your
followers onTwitter @CrimeNotes or find them on theirnew blog.

PROFILING
From Page lA
ing by police.
Lacey told the audience he
was pointed out by the police
for stealing something that had
recently been reported miss-
ing. According to Lacey, he was
detained by police for 45 min-
utes though he had not stolen
anything. Lacey said he felt "a
lack of respect" in the situation.
Olumolade also described a
situation in which he was ques-
tioned by DPS officers because
he broadly fit the description of
a suspect in a crime alert.
DPS Chief Greg O'Dell then

addressed the crowd and point-
ed out that the University must
adhere to federal requirements
when issuing crime alerts. The
guidelines mandate the inclu-
sion of "all information that
would promote safety and that
would aid the prevention of
similar crimes," the guidelines
state.
DPS also issues alerts for
incidents that have occurred in
areas of the Ann Arbor Police
Department's jurisdiction near
campus.
Another attendee of the
meeting asked about a DPS
crime alert in which a suspect
was described as having dread-
locks or being bald. O'Dell

responded, "Would it be the
right decision to put out noth-
ing even though the descrip-
tions are conflicting?"
According to O'Dell, DPS has
to include all information about
a case - race included.
However, O'Dell pointed out
that AAPD has policies to pro-
hibit racial profiling, including
writing, physical and psycho-
logical tests which are admin-
istered to prospective officers.
FOLLOW
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CHARLES DHARAPAK/AP
U.S. President Barack Obama, right, and Peruvian President Ollanta Humala leave the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation
Summit in Kapolei, Hamaii yesterday.
Oba-ma calls for Pacific
free tradepa by 2012

Trade zone will
increase U.S. exports,
create new jobs
HONOLULU (AP) - Pacific
Rim leaders gathered for an annu-
al summit in Hawaii pledged Sat-
urday to work together to keep
world growth on track, as Presi-
dent Barack Obama announced
the broad outlines of a plan he said
could serve as a model for a trans-
Pacific free trade zone.
"There are still plenty of details
to work out, but we are confident
that we can do so. So we've direct-
ed our teams to finalize this agree-
ment in the coming year," Obama
said while seated beside leaders
of eight other nations involved in
the negotiations toward setting up
what has been dubbed the Trans-
Pacific Partnership.
"It is an ambitious goal, but we
are optimistic that we can get it
done," he said.
The trade zone can serve as
a model for the region and for
other trade pacts, increasing U.S.
exports and helping to create
jobs, a top priority, in the fastest
growing region in the world, said
Obama, who made promoting the
so-called TPP a priority in hosting'

this week's summit in his home-
town, Honolulu.
Much of the work by Obama
and other leaders at the summit
of the 21-member Asia-Pacific
Economic Cooperation forum is
aimed at fostering freer trade and
closer cooperation to help fend off
recession as Europe struggles to
resolve its debt crisis.
"We have an enormous respon-
sibility for supporting the wider
world, a responsibility that no one
nation could seek to carry alone
- it can only be borne if we stand
shoulder-to-shoulder," Malaysian
Prime Minister Najib Razak said
in remarks to be delivered later
Saturday at the East West Center,
a Honolulu think tank.
By removing barriers and bot-
tlenecks that slow business, APEC
members hope to re-energize
growth at a time when the world
economy most needs dynamism
in the Asia-Pacific region to offset
the malaise spreading from crisis-
stricken Europe. At the same time
they are workingtoward a broader
agreement, countries are continu-
ing to forge separate free-trade
deals.
The U.S. recently clinched long-
sought free trade pacts with South
Korea, Colombia, and Panama
- agreements that if ratified will
t

bring to 20 the number of coun-
tries that have free trade agree-
mentswith the U.S.
On Friday, Vietnam and Chile
signed a free trade agreement on
the sidelines of the APEC meet-
ings that will further boost the
already thriving trade between
the two in Chilean copper and
steel and Vietnamese garments,
rice and coffee.
The outline for the free trade
pact announced by Obama and
other leaders pledges to work
toward eliminating tariffs and
other barriers to trade and invest-
ment, facilitating trade and other
business, harmonizing regulatory
standards, aiding small and medi-
um-size companies and contrib-
uting to development and poverty
relief.
Japan, the world's third-larg-
est economy, has also signaled it
wants to join the negotiations on
the Trans-Pacific Partnership,
and the Obama administration
hopes other nations will be wooed
as well.
But China, which some econo-
mists say is on course to over-
take the U.S. as the world's
biggest economy this decade, has
appeared lukewarm about the
Pacific trade pact, describing it as
"overly ambitious."

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