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November 14, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-11-14

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 14, 2011

michigandaily.com

CAMPUS CRIME
Students
talk racial
profiling in
DPS alerts

Redshirt junior cornerback T. Floyd had an interception and two pass breakups in No. 22 Michigan's 31-14 victory over Illinois on Saturday.
"0/
Foyd roves Mattison Cs
mnagic touch on defense

Members of
Students of Color
of Rackham discuss
issue at meeting
By ROBBIE AUSTIN
For the Daily
The issue of racial profiling
in University crime alerts took
center stage at a University
town hall meeting on Friday.
University students and Ann
Arbor residents gathered at the
University Law School to dis-
cuss the relation of safety, cam-
pus climate and diversity on
campus. The event - chaired by
Rackham student David Green,
the political action chair of
Students of Color of Rackham
- focused on racism and social
justice at the University, with
an emphasis on racial profiling.
One of the key issues dis-
cussed was the use of racial
descriptions in the University's
Department of Public Safety
crime alerts. Of the 22 crime
alerts released by DPS between
Jan. 1, 2011 and Nov. 9, 2011, 12
incidents occurred off campus
and nine took place on cam-

pus, according to data released
by DPS. Of these 22 alerts, 11
specifically identified the skin
color of the suspect as white,
five as black, one as darker
skinned, one as hispanic, one as
tan, one as olive and two had no
raceinformation.
Philosophy Prof. Elizabeth
Anderson said information
about race is not needed in
crime alerts because it doesn't
add any information to the
description.
"There is no value added
in the description (of race),"
Anderson said. "It reinforces
the legitimacy of spreading ste-
reotypes and damages the rep-
utation of black men."
The speakers argued that
racial descriptors apply to
broad groups of people on cam-
pus and therefore generate fear
of these groups. Anderson said
innocent people fitting the
racial description are negative-
ly impacted by the wording in
DPS alerts.
University alum Walter Lacy
and Rackham student Gbenga
Olumolade, an e-board liaison
for SCOR, described their per-
sonal experiences with what
they regarded as racial profil-
See PROFILING, Page 2A

CHAMPAIGN - J.T.
Floyd took one last look
around Memorial Sta-
dium.
The stands were quickly
emptying. Michigan center
David Molk was standing at the
midfield block 'I,' posing with
Illinois center Graham Pocic, a
former high school teammate.
As Floyd started crossingthe
turf toward the tunnel to the
visitor's locker room, he saw Illi-
nois wide receiver A.J. Jenkins
approaching him. The receiver-
cornerback duo hadbattled all
game long.

Floyd pulled up at the goal
line.
"Heck
of a game,
man," Floyd
told the All-
American
wideout. "I
think you're
a heck of a
talent."
Jenkins, STEPHEN J.
in his orange NESBITT
No. 8 jersey,
gave a big
smile and tossed the same com-
pliment back at Floyd - Michi-

gan's No. 8.
"Make sure you go get the
rest of the (defensive backs) and
give them some trouble the rest
of the season," Floyd said as he
stepped away.
He tucked the winged helmet
under his left arm and trotted
through the north endzone and
into the tunnel.
Beneath the dreadlocks,
just below the eye black, Floyd
couldn't contain his smile. He
was still beaming as he climbed
onto the team bus a half hour
later.
He went man-to-man against

the best receiver in the Big Ten
on the road and won. Not only
did No.22 Michigan beat Illi-
nois, 31-14, but Floyd sealed the
victory with a fourth-quarter
interception.
"Coming into the game and
into this week, I knew A.J.
Jenkins was a great receiver,"
Floyd said. "His stats speak for
his skills. He's top-10 in almost
every category in the nation. So
I knew it was a big week for me."
He gave another grin.
"And he's number 8, too, so
took that kind of personal."
See NESBITT, Page SA

CAMPUS COMMUNITY
Survivors of
Holocaust share
stories at Hillel

Campus honors Veterans Day
Student veterans discuss advantages, challenges

I

Fifth annual
luncheon honors
anniversary of
Kristallnacht
By TAYLOR WIZNER
Daily StaffReporter
Fryda Fleish was only 12
years old when the Germans
invaded Chrzanow, Poland in
1927.
For three years, Fleish was
separated from her family and
placed in a concentration camp.
When she was finally freed, she
was one of few surviving mem-
bers of her nearly 60-person
extended family.
Fleish was one of 50 Holo-
caust survivors who shared
their experiences with students
and visitors at the University
of Michigan Hillel yesterday.
The 5th annual Conference on
the Holocaust was held in com-
memoration of the anniversary
week of Kristallnacht - "the

night of broken glass" - which
occurred on Nov. 9, 1938, when
Hitler ordered the Nazis to
persecute Jewish people and
destroy all their property.
LSA junior Shana Sternberg,
chair of the event, said more
students may have attended the
event than in the past because
it occurred in the fall semester
rather than the winter semes-
ter when many students are
studying abroad.
"We had alot of non-Jewish
students that came, which was
one of our goals because we
don't want to just target the
Jewish community, but expand
to everyone since a lot of people
who died during the Holocaust
were not Jewish," Sternberg
said. "We want to spread the
message never to forget this
awful event and to educate peo-
ple through their stories."
Sternberg said the lun-
cheon was especially powerful
because the participants could
interact directly with the survi-
vors, who sat with small groups
See HOLOCAUST, Page SA

AO
TODD NEEDLE/Daily
U.S. Army and Navy veterans play in the second annual wheelchair basketball game at Saline High School on Saturday to
celebrate Veterans Day and Investing in Ability Week. TOP RIGHT: U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.) visits the game.

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
Study shows
progress on
sickle cell
research
'U' study uses
proteins to
prevent disease
By PAIGE PEARCY
Daily Staff Reporter
For a group of mice in Dr.
Andrew Campbell's lab, the
pain caused by sickle cell
anemia just started to go
away.
Campbell, a pediatrician
and director of the Pediatric
Comprehensive Sickle Cell
Program at the University's
Cancer Center, is the lead
author of a study published
last month that is the first to
use specific proteins in the
human body to prevent sickle
cell disease.
Sickle cell anemia is a
hereditary disease of the
blood, which causes red
bloods cells to form in an
abnormal crescent moon
shape, instead of the normal
disk shape. These sickle-
shaped cells are more fragile
See RESEARCH, Page SA

By CHELSEA LANDRY
Daily StaffReporter
Red, white and blue balloons
adorned the halls of the Michi-
gan Union on Friday, welcoming
participants to this year's Veter-
ans Day tribute.
A day-long campus-wide sym-
posium on Friday was designed
to honor veterans and enlisted
individuals, to acknowledge
their sacrifices and to discuss the
challenges student veterans face
when they return to school after
service. The events, which took
See VETS, Page SA

Basketball game held for vets

By ANNA ROZENBERG
Daily StaffReporter
SALINE, Mich. - For a
group of veterans and Univer-
sity-affiliated military mem-
bers, celebrating Veterans Day
meant a trip to the basketball
court.
On Saturday, the second
annual veterans wheelchair
basketball game brought veter-
ans, active military members,
student veterans, University

ROTC students and family and
other supporters to Saline High
School. This year marked the
first game to actually take place
during Veterans Day weekend
- a trend the organizers plan
to continue.
Among the attendees at the,
event was U.S. Rep. John Ding-
ell (D-Mich.), a World War It
veteran, who said in an address
to the crowd that he was root-
ing for both the Army and Navy
See BASKETBALL, Page SA

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