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October 03, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-03

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4

2A - Monday, October 3, 2011 _ The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

WING FLING

l 4c Iidh-loan Daily.
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG ZACH YANCER
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-418-4115 ext. 1251 734-418-4115 ext. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com zyancer@michigandaily.com

Former 'U' student paid to take SAT

Emory University sophomore
Sam Eshaghoff - who attended
the University of Michigan his
freshman year - was arrested
Tuesday for allegedly takingthe
SAT for students at Great Neck
North High School in Long
Island, N.Y., according to a Sept.
27 Associated Press article.
The students allegedly paid
Eshaghoff between $1,500 and
$2,000 to take the test, accord-
ing to the AP. He was arrest-
ed on charges of scheming to
defraud, criminal imperson-
ation and falsifying business
records. Six other students were
also arrested on misdemeanor
charges for paying Eshaghoff,
according to the article.

The students were are
after teachers heard ru
that someone was takini
SAT for them.
SETON HALL ALTER
TUITION POLICY
Seton Hall UnivE
announced Wednesday th
will change its tuition poli
allow high-achieving stuc
to pay $10,104 instead of th
ular $31,440 once they e
according to a Sept. 29 arti
The Wall Street Journal.
After their first year, stu
can keep the reduced ra
long as they maintain a 3.0
accordingto the article.

CRIME NOTES
Disunion at In the toilet,
the Union not the street

ested THREATS TO COLLEGE DJS
mors LEAD TO ARREST
g the
Bridgewater State Univer-
sity alumn Alex Finnegan was
iS arrested last Monday after
threatening to shoot the disc
jockeys at WBIM, the Massa-
ersity chusetts school's radio station,
hat it if they did not play his request-
icy to ed song, The Huffington Post
dents reported.
e reg- Finnegan called multiple
nroll, times asking for a song by punk
icle in rock band Rufio that was not in
the radio's collection. After sev-
dents eral attempts, Finnegan made a
te as threat to "shoot the place up,"
GPA, accordingto the article. LSA sophomore L
- PAIGE PEARCY sorority, serves ch
CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Harvard Law CORRECTIONS
.. An article inthe
campus visit Sept..30,2011edition
of The Michigan Daily
WHAT: Harvard Law ('Universityadmissions
School's assistant director still need-blind despite
of admissions will answer fundingcuts)incorrectly
questions from prospective stated the increased
students about the amount of financial aid
pogram. The Career Center University offered
WHEN: Today at noon this year, the number of
WHERE: The Career applications received for
Center, room 3200 the current academic year,
the number of students
who were admitted and
ileathr lecture also implied an incorrect
numbmerofundergraduate
WHAT: Four medical students receiving
professionals will discuss financial aid for the 2010-
bipolar disorder and related 2011 academicyear. Aid
topics. The keynote speaker, increased 10.9 pecent,
Andrew Nierenberg, is the 39,570 applications were
associate director of the 39,i7e applicatuns
Depression Clinical and recieved, 16,046 students
Research Program at the were admitted and
Massachusetts General 17,2ltundergraduates
Hospital. recieved financial aid.
WHO: Depression Center
WHEN: Today at 1 p.m. Please report any
WHERE: Rackham error inthe Daily
Graduate School, 4th floor to corrections@
amphitheater michigandaily.com.

Newsroom
734-418-4110 opt.3
Corrections
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SportsSection
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onlineads@michigandaily.com

4

WHERE: Michigan Union
WHEN: Saturday at about
1:50 a.m.
WHAT: Fist fights broke
out among a group of
people after an event,
University Police reported.
Officers quelled the fights,
and no one was harmed.

WHERE: Hill Street
WHEN: Saturday at about
12:50 a.m.
WHAT: Two males were
given a verbal warning
about urinating in public,
University Police reported.
The men were not affiliated
with the University.

News Tips
news@michigandaily.com
Letterstothe Editor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
PhotographySection
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaily.com
Finance
finance@michigandaily.com

aura Lewis, a member of Chi Omega
icken wings for a fundraiser Friday.
The city of Martinez,
Calif. forced an artist to
paint over a small beaver
he had painted in a mural,
the San Fransisco Chronicle
reported. The decision
came after beavers caused
extensive damage to the
city's public works.
Michigan's 58-point
win against Minnesota
on Saturday was the
largest"margin offvictory in
the 107-year history of the
Little Brown Jug game.
"> FOR MORE, SEE SPORTSMONDAY,
INSIDE
Frank Biden, sibling of
Vice President Joseph
Biden, was hospitalized
Saturday after opening a
package that contained a
mysterious white powder,
ABC News reported. The
powder was deemed safe by
the FBI.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Nick Spar Managing Editor nickspar@michigandaily.com
Nicole Aber ManagingNews Editor aber@michigandaily.com
SENIORNEWS EDITORS:BethanyBiron, Dylan Cinti,Caitlin Huston,JosephLichterman,
ASStSTANTNEWSEDITORS:HaleyGlatthorn,ClaireGoscicki,SuzanneJacobs,Sabira
Kahn, Michele Narov, Paige Pearcy, Adam Rubenfire, Kaitlin Williams
Michelle Dewittand opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emily Orley Editorial Page Editors
SENIOREDITORIALPAGEEDITORS:AidaAli,AshleyGriesshammer,AndrewWeiner
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: HarshaNahata, TimothyRabb
Stephen J. Nesbitt and sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Tim ROhan ManagingSports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Ben Estes, Michael Florek, Zach Helfand, Luke Pasch, Zak
Pyzik, KevinRatery,
ASSISANTPO RTS EDITORS: Everett Cook, Neal Rothschild, Matt Rudnitsky, Matt
Slovin, Liz Vukelich, Daniel Wasserman
SharonJacobs ManagingArts Editor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Jacob Axelrad, Cassie Balfour, Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase
Proma Khosa,David Tao
Marissa McClain and photo@michigandaily.com
Jed Moch Managing PhototEditors
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:ErinKirkland,ChrisRyba,AnnaSchulte,SamanthaTrauben
Zach Bergson and design@michigandaily.com
Helen Lieblich Managing Design Editors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Anna Lein-Zielinski
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS: Kristi Begonja, CarinanLewis
Carolyn Klarecki Magazine Editor klarecki@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITORS:StephenOstrowski,Devon Thorsby, ElyanaTwiggs
Josh Healy Copychief copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIOR COPY EDITORS: Christine Chun, Hannah Poindexter
SarahSqire Websevelopment Manager squire@michiandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Julianna Cri Associate Business Manager
Rachel Greinetz sales Manager
Alexis Newton Production Manager
Meghan RooneLaMyot M er
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
Quy Vo Circulation Manager
The Michigan Dailyl(SSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is avaiablefree of charge
to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Doaily's office for $2.Subscriptions for
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TheMchin Dily isi ember ofThteAssociatedPres ndTiheoiaeClleiePres.

Skaters scurry Chemical spill

WHERE: Lot N-8, 900
Huron Dr.
WHEN: Friday at about
6:10 p.m.
WHAT: A staff member
discovered six subjects
skateboarding and
rollerblading, University
Police reported. No
members of the group
were present when officers
arrived at the scene.

WHERE: Medical Science
Research Building
WHEN: Friday at about
11:15 a.m.
WHAT: Occupational
Safety and Environmental
Health staff cleaned up
of ethanolamine that had
spilled out of a broken
container, University Police
reported. No one was
iniured.

1
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Help The Michigan Daily win the
Twitter Throwdown against
The State News
FOLLOW
@MICHIGANDAILY

4

4

S t KtAlE KEI TH/AP
Protesters walk onto New York's Brooklyn Bridge on Saturday before police began making arrests during a march by Occupy Wall Street. Protesters speaking out
against corporate greed and other grievances attempted to walk over the bridge from Manhattan, resulting in the arrest of more than 700.
700 arrested after Wall Street
protest spills to Brooklyn Bridge

I

Protesters disrupt
NYC traffic for
several hours
NEW YORK (AP) - More
than 700 protesters demonstrat-
ing against corporate greed,
global warming and social
inequality, among other griev-
ances, were arrested Saturday
after they swarmed the Brook-
lyn Bridge and shut down a lane
of traffic for several hours in a
tense confrontation with police.
The group Occupy Wall
Street has been camped out in a
plaza in Manhattan's Financial
District for nearly two weeks
staging various marches, and
had orchestrated an impromptu
trek to Brooklyn on Saturday
afternoon. They walked in thick
rows on the sidewalk up to the
bridge, where some demonstra-
tors spilled onto the roadway
after being told to stay on the
pedestrian pathway, police said.
The majority of those arrest-
ed were given citations for
disorderly conduct and were
released, police said.

Some protesters sat on the
roadway, chanting "Let us go,"
while others chanted and yelled
at police from the pedestrian
walkaway above. Police used
orange netting to stop the group
from going farther down the
bridge, which is under construc-
tion.
Some of the protesters said
they were lured onto the road-
way by police, or they didn't
hear the calls from authorities
to head to the pedestrian walk-
way. Police said no one was
tricked into being arrested, and
those in the back of the group
who couldn't hear were allowed
to leave.
"Multiple warnings by police
were given to protesters to stay
on the pedestrian walkway and
that if they took roadway they
would be arrested," said Paul
Browne, the chief spokesman
of the New York Police Depart-
ment.
Erin Larkins, a Columbia
University graduate student at
who says she and her boyfriend
have significant student loan
debt, was among the thousands
of protesters on the bridge. She

said a friend persuaded her to
join the march and she's glad
she did.
"I don't think we're ask-
ing for much, just to wake up
every morning not worrying
whether we can pay the rent, or
whether our next meal will be
rice and beans again," Larkins
wrote in an email to The Asso-
ciated Press. "No one is expect-
ing immediate change. I think
everyone is just hopeful that
people will wake up a bit and
realize that the more we speak
up, the more the people that
do have the authority to make
changes in this world listen."
Several videos taken of the
event show a confusing, chaotic
scene. Some show protesters
screaming obscenities at police
and taking a hat from one of
the officers. Others show police
struggling with people who
refuse to get up. Nearby, a cou-
ple posed for wedding pictures
on the bridge.
"We were supposed to go up
the pedestrian roadway," said
Robert Cammiso, a 48-year-old
student from Brooklyn told the
Daily News. "There was a huge
4

funnel, a bottleneck, and we
couldn't fit. People jumped from
the walkway onto the roadway.
We thought the roadway was
open to us."
Earlier Saturday, thousands
who joined two other marches
crossed the Brooklyn Bridge
without problems. One was
from Brooklyn to Manhattan
by a group opposed to geneti-
cally modified food. Another in
the opposite direction marched
against poverty organized by
United Way.
Elsewhere in the U.S. on Sat-
urday, protesters assembled
in Albuquerque, N.M., Boston
and Los Angeles to express
their solidarity with the move-
ment in New York, though
their demands remain unclear.
Occupy Wall Street demonstra-
tors have been camped in Zuc-
cotti Park and have clashed
with police on earlier occasions.
Mostly, the protests have been
peaceful, and the movement has
shown no signs of losing steam.
Celebrities including Michael
Moore and Susan Sarandon
made recent stops to encourage '
the group.

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