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October 03, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-10-03

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1

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, October 3, 2011

michigandailycom

STATE BUDGET
State assessing
new measures
for allocating
higher ed..funds

MARISSA MCCLAIN/daily
Members of the Michigan football team celebrate with the Brown Jug. The Wolverines opened Big Ten play with a 58-0 win over Minnesota on Saturday.
It wasn't traditional, but it was a
nearly awless Big Ten beatdown

ichigan's three cap-
tains and fifth-year
senior defensive
tackle Ryan Van Bergen, the
leader of
the stingy
Michigan
defense,
rushed
across the
field toward
the student
section,
holding STEPHEN J.
the Little NESBITT
Brown Jug
in the air.
Those seniors holding the
Jug had carried the weight of

a 6-18 Big Ten record the past
three seasons.
It was the first Big Ten
game of Michigan's new
regime - the coaching trifec-
ta of head coach Brady Hoke,
offensive coordinator Al Borg-
es and defensive coordinator
Greg Mattison.
And they put on quite the
opening act.
The newcomers spared
the pleasantries and imposed
their will on Minnesota
on Saturday, trouncing the
Gophers, 58-0.
If it were the early 1900s,
when Fielding Yost prowled
the sidelines with his menac-

ing glare, the Gophers would
have pleaded with the Wolver-
ines to end this game early.
But Michigan had some-
thing to prove.
The goal wasn't to pick on
Minnesota, the conference's
basement-dweller and its
freshman quarterback, but to
remind the Big Ten that Mich-
igan is still Michigan.
The offense's greeting for
the Gophers was 58 points.
The defense pitched a shutout.
Michigan is an unbeaten 5-0
again. But this team isn't the
same as last season.
Hoke, Borges and Mattison
did exactly what Rich Rodri-

guez couldn't - they relent-
lessly pounded an inferior Big
Ten foe.
Hoke, Mattison and Borges
can and will do what it takes
to win in the Big Ten.
Al Borges has brought a
new flavor to Michigan.
on the second play of the
game, backup quarterback
Devin Gardner settled under
center. Behind him was a dia-
mond set with three running
backs.
Gardner took the snap,
turned and handed the ball
to Denard Robinson, bolting
left to right along the line of
See NESBITT, Page SA

After FY 2012 cuts,
gov't mulling ways
to dole out college
funding for 2013
By ANDREW SCHULMAN
Daily Staff Reporter
State budget cuts to higher edu-
cation funding for the 2012 fiscal
year - which started Saturday
- have forced public universities
across the state to close depart-
ments, lay off employees and raise
tuition.
But among University officials,
there is hope that the funding cuts
- the largest in Michigan's his-
tory - could also prompt the gov-
ernment to reform distribution of
the state's appropriations among
its 15 public institutions.
The reductions, which were
originally part of Republican
Gov. Rick Snyder's proposed state
budget for the 2012 fiscal year,
decreased funding for higher edu-
cation by $225 million - playing a
factor in the University's decision
to raise tuition to cover a $47.5
million shortage.
After the reduced state funding

left the University with the $47.5
million shortfall, the University's
Board of Regents voted in June
to raise tuition for in-state and
out-of-state students. The rate of
increase was 6.7 percent for in-
state students and 4.9 percent for
non-residents.
In the aftermath of this year's
cuts, however, the state has
See ALLOCATIONS, Page 3A

GRADUATE EMPLOYEES \
Deans share opposition
to GSRA unionization

18 deans write
letter to provost
expressing views
against union
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily News Editor
University officials have
previously expressed in public
their concern about the Univer-
sity's recent move to grant grad-

uate student research assistants
the right to union. And recently,
the majority of deans have also
shared their opinions to Univer-
sity Provost Philip Hanlon in a
private letter.
In the letter, which was
acquired by the Mackinac Cen-
ter for Public Policy, current
and former deans from 18 of the
University's 19 schools and col-
leges shared their reservations
about the possible unionization
to Hanlon. The deans wrote
that while they respect the deci-

sion of the University's Board of
Regents to allow GSRAs to have
collective bargaining rights,
unionization would "put at risk
the excellence" of the Univer-
sity.
"We note that graduate stu-
dent research assistants are not
unionized at the peer institu-
tions against whom the Univer-
sity competes for faculty and
graduate students ..." the deans
wrote. "We worry that a GSRA
union would make Michigan an
See GSRA, Page 5A

UNIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION
Delayed Dennison update to change
classrooms into 'U' institute offices

ZACH BERGSON/Daily
Physicists gather at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill. to commemorate the closing of the 28-year-
old Tevatron particle accelerator on Friday.
'U' physicists say farewell to
Tevatron particle accelerator

Future renovations
part of plan to use
academic space
more efficiently
By JENNIFER LEE
Daily Staff Reporter
Students running late for
class in the David M. Dennison
building might no longer have

to worry about sprinting up six
flights of stairs.
With planned renovations
in the next few years, Denni-
son's classrooms will be trans-
formed into academic centers
and University institute offices.
The renovations, which were
originally supposed to start this
year, are part of the University's
plan to use its academic spaces
more efficiently.
University officials have dis-
cussed renovating the Dennison

building since 2009, when plans
to renovate the fourth floor of
the building were announced
by former University Provost
Teresa Sullivan. The project
was delayed and never imple-
mented.
Last fall, University Provost
Philip Hanlon spoke of plans
to renovate the sixth floor of
the building and to move the
Graham Environmental Sus-
tainability Institute and the
See DENNISON, Page SA

28-year-old collider
closed due to
federal funding cut
By ZACH BERGSON
Daily StaffReporter
BATAVIA, Ill. - University
physicist Myron Campbell was
one ofhundreds of scientists who
watched a close friend of almost
28 years get put to rest on Friday.
The companion was the Teva-

tron particle accelerator, located
at the Fermi National Accelera-
tor Laboratory in this Chicago
suburb and the victim of a famil-
iar culprit - budget cuts. In
January, the U.S. Department
of Energy denied a $100 million
funding request that would have
allowed the particle accelera-
tor to continue operating for an
additional three years.
The accelerator used super-
conducting magnets to propel
protons at speeds close to the
See TEVATRON, Page 3A

ZACH BERGSON/Oaiiy
A machine that collects anti-protons
for the Tevatron particle accerlator.

WEATHER HI:70
TOMORROW LO: 49

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2 l The Michigan Daily NEWS ........................5A SPORTSMONDAY..........1B
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