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September 27, 2011 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2011-09-27

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TOUGHEST CRITIC
Denard Robinson may be struggling
through the air. But don't worry -
he's aware,
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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

michigandaily.com

Groundcover representative Robert Salo sells copies of the newspaper on the corner of South State Street and East Liberty Street on Thursday, Sept. 22.
Ne wspaper offers support
for A 2 homeless community

FACULTY GOVERNANCE
Members of
SACUA talk
privacy of
'U' directory
Students their profiles -specifically the
public groups they belong to -
.have raised on the website.
The University overhauled
concerns about the online directory over the
, summer and switched to a
MCommunity Google search engine for all
umich.edu websites, which
By MARY HANNAHAN changed how people search
Daily StaffReporter names on MCommunity. Jack
Bernard, associate general
Though many young people counsel of SACUA, said the
are open with their personal switch made some University
information on social network- members' personal information
ing sites like Facebook and more accessible to the general
Twitter, some University stu- public when the website was
dents are concerned about pri- first introduced. But he said the
vacy controls on the University's glitches have since been fixed.
new online directory. The same amount of infor-
Two students recently con- mation is available to the public
tacted Kate Barald, chair of the on MCommunity as in the old
Senate Advisory Committee on online directory, but the dif-
University Affairs and a profes- ference is that the new "group"
sor in the Medical School and tab makes information slightly
College of Engineering, about easier to find, Bernard said.
information security on the "We didn't change anything,"
University directory, MCom- Bernard said. "We just got a bet-
munity. At a meeting before the ter search engine."
University's leading faculty gov- One of the students who
ernance body yesterday, Barald came to Barald is an Iranian
discussed the students' con- student who belongs to LGBTQ
cerns that people unaffiliated groups on campus, Barald said
with the University can view See SACUA, Page5

Low-income
individuals find
work with monthly
paper Groundcover
By JENNIFER LEE
Daily StaffReporter
While people normally read
newspapers to find out what's
happening in the world, a group
of homeless individuals hope to
use the print media to provide
economic relief, empowerment

and a sense of community.
The monthly street newspaper
Groundcover, founded in April
2010, provides job opportunities
and serves as a collective voice
for people facing tough financial
conditions. Seventy-five people
in total have been trained at
seminars provided by the news-
paper, which contains articles
on numerous topics as well as
advertisements from local busi-
nesses. The paper is now also
garnering greater support from
University students.
Vendors receive 10 free papers
to sell and can subsequently buy

additional papers for people to
purchase for 25 cents each. The
paper sells for $1 per copy.
Groundcover publisher Susan
Beckett said the newspaper plays
an important role for homeless
people by offering thei a source
of income.
"The way the economy is right
now, there are so many people
who have no alternative," Beck-
ett said. "(For one vendor) that
dollar is what lets him do his
laundry."
Currently, the newspaper has
25 active vendors. The seminars
the 75 people have attended

include classes on advanced sell-
ing, basic computing and writ-
ing for potential contributors to
Groundcover.
Beckett described Ground-
cover's content as "eclectic,"
which ranges from interviews
with members of the Ann Arbor
community to articles on how to
reduce one's carbon footprint.
"We want people to buy the
paper, we want people to enjoy
the paper and 12 pages of pov-
erty and homelessness can get
pretty depressing," Beckett said.
"Typically, a quarter or less of
See NEWSPAPER, Page 5

OBSERVING ON CAMPUS
Preachers legally able to
voice opinions on campus

Speakers protected
by First Amendment
on 'U' property
By PAIGE PEARCY
Daily StaffReporter
The Diag is often filled with
sounds of students hustling to
class, squirrels running about,
crunching leaves and some-
times, the voices of people shar-
ing their beliefs.

one of these people is Mike
Reed, also known as Brother
Mike, who often visits the Diag
for his "open air preaching."
And while some students say
demonstrators on campus irri-
tate them, the preachers are not
in violation of any University
policies and are protected by the
First Amendment.
The people who air their.
views on the Diag come to cam-
pus since it provides them the
opportunity to speak to stu-
dents. Reed said he and others

speak on University property
because they are worried about
students' futures.
"I believe most of them are
living in sin," Reed said. "A lot
of the students are the lead-
ers of future generations so we
believe it's a good time to bring
God's truth into play, to bring
the Bible, and hopefully change
some minds of some of the stu-
dents."
Preaching, protesting and
sharing dissenting opinions on
See PREACHERS, Page 5

LOCAL BUSINESSES
Underground Printing owner
continues to, expand business

TERRA MOLENGRAFF/Daiiy
The Lunch Room, a food cart in the Mark's Carts courtyard, was the only stand open yesterday due to the weather.
Food cart courtyard Mark's Carts to close
for winter monthsreopen in early March

U alum now has
16 stores in various
college towns
By CHELSEA LANDRY
For the Daily
University alum Rishi Nara-
yan, co-owner of Underground
Printing, has launched his

entrepreneurial pursuits down
the street from his former stu-
dent address on South Univer-
sity Avenue and to 10 states in
the past decade.
Narayan, who graduated
from the University in 2003
with a degree in chemical engi-
neering and went on to earn a
master's degree in engineering
in 2005, founded Underground
Printing in Ann Arbor in 2001.

C ON T INUIlN G S E R IES:
B E H IND T HE B USIN ESS
Since then, his business has
grown to 16 locations in college
towns mostly in the Midwest.
Despite the business's geo-
graphical expansion, Narayan
said Ann Arbor continues to be
See BUSINESS, Page 5

Christmas trees houses the multiple food carts
that make up Mark's Carts, will
to be sold in - be used for the sale of Home and
Garden's Christmas trees, giv-
South Ashley space ing it the name the Downtown
Christmas Tree Lot. All food
By PATRICIA SNIDER carts in the area will close in
Daily StaffReporter early November and reopen in
early March, according to Mark
This winter, when people Hodesh, owner of Mark's Carts.
walk by the courtyard on South Though Mark's Carts will
Ashley and West Washing- close, Joel Panozzo, co-owner
ton Streets, they'll no longer of The Lunch Room - a vegan
smell a variety of foods but will food cart in the space - wrote
instead get a hint of pine waft- in an e-mail interview that his
ing through the air. business will provide catering to
The space, which currently local companies while the cart

is closed.
"We expect business to be a
little different this fall," Panoz-
zo wrote. "We are beginning to
sell our cookies at coffee shops
(presently just at Lab on East
Liberty Street). So, we are hop-
ing catering and other food
events this fall and winter will
compliment the less traffic as it
gets colder."
Phillis Engelbert, co-owner
of The Lunch Room, said the
cart is contributing to a variety
of fall events in the West Wash-
ington space including a Hal-
See CARTS, Page 5

WEATHER HI: 61 GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWON MICHIGANDAILYCOM
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news@michigandaily.com and let us know. MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS/THE WIRE

INDEX AP NEWS.................3 CLASSIFIEDS,... .....6
VolCXXII,No.16 OPINION.................4 ARTS.... .............7
2 heMichigan Daily NEWS........................5 SPORTS. .................
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