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April 15, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-04-15

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2 - Friday, April 15, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Friday, April 15, 2011 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

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0
6

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS

& NOTES THREE THINGS YOU
SHOUD KNOW TODAY
Dane

Machine
menace fails
WHERE: Duderstadt
Building
WHEN: Yesterday at about
3 a.m.
WHAT: Two vending
machines were found
damaged, University
Police reported. No cash or
contents were taken. There
are currently no suspects.

Flaming filth
WHERE: South
Quadrangle Residence Hall
WHEN: Yesterday at about
6:15 a.m.
WHAT: A Housing security
officer discovered flaming
items in a trashcan outside
the building, University
Police reported. The fire
was prompty extinguished
and nothing was damaged.

Cell charger .Backhoedigs
snatched intocar

Scientific
symposium
WHAT: Keynote speaker
Dr. Steven Frank of the
University of California
at Irvine will lecture on
the evolution and ecology
of infectious diseases.
Registration is free.
WHO: Department of
Ecology and Evolutionary
Biology
WHEN: Tomorrow at 9 a.m.
WHERE: Ross School of
Business
Health lecture
WHAT: Michael Holick,
professor of medicine
at Boston University,
will discuss vitamin D
deficiency in children and
adults.
WHO: University Hospital
Comprehensive Diabetes
Center
WHEN: Today at 12 p.m.
WHERE: Ford
Amphitheater of the
University Hospital

performance
WHAT: The South Asian
fusion dance troupe Maya
will perform alongside the
University a capella group
Dicks & Janes in its sixth
annual showcase.
WHO: Maya Dance Team
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Mendelssohn
Theatre
CORRECTIONS
* An article in the
April 13 edition of The
Michigan Daily ("MSA
rejects resolution ask-
ingfor 'U'divestment
from four companies")
misquoted and mis-
spelled the name of LSA
junior Bilal Baydoun.
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

1China's State Adminis-
tration for Radio, Film
and Television has
banned time travel from
occuring in the media,
according to Time Maga-
zine. The ban may stem
from a fear of disrespect for
China's history, the' article
states.
The new murder-mys-
tery show "The Kill-
ing" continues on AMC
this Sunday at 8 p.m. The
series follows the investiga-
tion into the death of a high
school girl in Seattle.
FOR MORE, SEEARTS, PAGE5
3 The 2010 U.S. Cen-
sus shows that there
has been a 17-percent
increase in the number of peo-
ple living near nuclear plants,
according to MSNBC. A plant
in New York has 17.2 million
people living within 50 miles
of it, the article states.

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
wintr terms by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is avaiablefree of charge
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tsbsciptionrateO-ampssubsciptonsfortell term are 5.Ssitiptionsmttbe prepai.
The Michigan Dtily its merofatThe Asociated Press andThe Atsociated Caoegiae Press.

WHERE: University
Hospital Emergency Room
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 10:30 p.m.
WHAT: A cell phone
charger was taken from a
patient's room, University
Police reported. There are
currently no suspects.

WHERE: 2500 block of
Draper Road
WHEN: Wednesday at
about 9:30 a.m.
WHAT: A vehicle was
struck by a backhoe,
University Police reported.
The owner is pursuing
compensation from
insurance.

i. .._

Gay history must be part of
education, Calif. bill states

Iraqi army attacks Iranian
camp after days of tension

Democratic bill
passes on 23-14
party line vote
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)
- Gays, lesbians, bisexuals and
transgender people would be
added to the lengthy list of social
and ethnic groups that public
schools must include in social
studies lessons under a landmark
bill passed yesterday by the Cali-
fornia Senate.
If the bill is adopted bythe state

Assembly and signed by Gov. Jerry
Brown, California would become
the first state to require the teach-
ing of gay history.
Supporters say the move is
needed to counter anti-gay stereo-
types and beliefs that make chil-
dren in those groups vulnerable to
bullying and suicide.
Opponents counter that such
instruction would further burden
an already crowded curriculum
and expose students to a subject
that some parents find objection-
able.
The legislation, sponsored by

Democratic Sen. Mark Leno of
San Francisco, passed on a 23-14
party line vote. It also would add
disabled people to the curriculum.
The bill gives school districts
flexibility in deciding what to
include in the lessons and at what
grades students would receive
them.
But starting in the 2013-14
school year, it would prohibit dis-
tricts and the California Board of
Educationfromusingtextbooks or
other instructional materials that
reflect adversely on gay, bisexual
and transgender Americans.

34
BAG
army
Ashraf
dead, a
man w
first i
for the
rebuke
ern alli
The

E killed in what People's Mujahedeen Organi-
zation of Iran, which seeks to
fficial terms a overthrow Iran's clerical lead-
ers. The group won refuge at
massacre Camp Ashraf years ago during
the regime of Saddam Hussein,
HDAD (AP) - An Iraqi who saw them as a convenient
raid last week on Camp ally against Iran. But since then,
left 34 Iranian exiles the exiles have become an irri-
ccordingto a U.N. spokes- tant to Iraq's new Shiite-led.
'ho yesterday offered the government, which is trying to
independent death toll bolster ties with Iran.
e attack that drew sharp The attack was the climax
s from Baghdad's West- of days of building tensions
ies. between the Iraqi army and the
April 8 raid targeted the Ashraf residents, who feared
they were about to be attacked
after nervously watching sol-
diers bulk up their forces out-
side the camp. The Iraqi general
who led the raid said it was in
response to Ashraf residents
pelting his troops with rocks and
throwing themselves in front of
military cars.
U.S. Senate Foreign Relations
Chairman John Kerry yesterday
called ita "massacre."
The U.N. visit was critical
because the Ashraf residents
and the Iraqi government have
issued wildly different accounts
of the raid and the reasons
behind it.
U.N. human rights spokes-
man Rupert Colville in Geneva
said a team of U.N. observers
saw 28 bodies still at the camp
8l9 during a Wednesday visit to the
compound in eastern Diyala
province. Most of the bod-
ies appeared to have been shot
St and some were women, he said.
Three of the bodies appeared
to have been crushed to death,
a Western diplomat in Baghdad
said - likely from being run over
by a car.
"It's clearly a very serious
incident and we are trying to
get more information," Colville
said. He said six bodies are
"elsewhere" but did not clarify
where.
The Ashraf residents main-
tained from the start that 34
people were killed and as many
as 325 wounded. The Iraqi gov-
ernment said three people were.

killed.
Both Iran and the U.S. con-
sider the People's Mujahedeen
Organization of Iran to be a
terrorist threat, although the
European Union removed the
group from its terror list several
years ago.
After Saddam fell, U.S. troops
took control of Camp Ashraf, dis-
armed its fighters and confined
the resident to their 30-square-
mile camp. In return, the mili-
tary signed an agreement with
the camp's 3,400 residents giving
them protected status under the
Geneva Conventions.
But it's not clear whether the
residents still have those legal
protections.
Iraqi allies in Washington
and London and U.N. officers in
Geneva sharply criticized last
week's raid, but Iran praised it.
Kerry called the raid "deeply
disturbing" and "simply unac-
ceptable." He called on the Iraqi
government to conduct a full and
serious investigation and said the
U.S., U.N. and European Union
must help broker a peaceful solu-
tion between the two sides.
"Corrective action is impera-
tive," Kerry said in a statement.
"The (Iraqi) investigation must
hold accountable the respon-
sible parties and ensure that
there will be no sequel to these
horrific events."
The U.N. inspection of the
camp came five days after
the human rights agency first
demanded to be allowed in.
The Iraqi army and police have
blocked access to the camp for
more than a year, following a
similar raid in July 2009.
A U.S. Army medical team
also entered the camp last week-
end to provide humanitarian
aid but has refused comment on
what it looked like inside. Jour-
nalists have not been allowed
in. Until the U.N. visit, the only
official casualty count in the
raid came from the morgue at
Baqouba public hospital, where
officials said they received 12
bodies from the camp.

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