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March 24, 2011 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-24

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2A - Thursday, March 24, 2011

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A - Thursday, March 24, 2011 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

thle Michigan 43atiy
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
STEPHANIE STEINBERG BRAD WILEY
Editor in Chief BusinessManager
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-410-4115 exe. 1241
steinberg@michigandaily.com tmdbusiness@gmnailccom

ACTING OUT

Falling into fun

Some University students
like to take risks and try new
things, and for students in
the Michigan Skydive club,
that means jumping out of a
plane at 18,000 feet.
Michigan Skydiving
began in 2006 with just a
few students who shared
a unique hobby. Timothy
Montrief, LSA sophomore
and club president, said his
vision is to expand the club's
outreach and recruitment
process for new members.
The club recently cre-
ated a new logo, marketing
plan and website in. what
Montrief called "a com-
plete overhaul and new

approach." Additionally, the
club is recruiting rookies
and long-time aficionados of
the sport.
From December through
April, the club holds month-
ly meetings on campus,
often inviting instructors or
other guest speakers with
different approaches to the
sport. During the remain-
ing months of the year, the
club takes weekly trips to
Skydive Tecumseh, a local
skydiving facility located in
Tecumseh, Michigan about
a half hour from campus.
First-time jumpers pay
about $200, which decreas-
es to $150 after the first five

times. Eventually, partici-
pation costs $20 for a plane
ticket and $20 for equipment
- if the jumper doesn't have
his or her own - bringing
the total cost for long-time
jumpers to about $40 a
week. Though the cost may
seem high to many college
students on a budget, Mon-
trief said he thinks the sport
provides a new outlook on
life.
"I had both a fear of
heights and a massive fear of
flying when I tried it the first
time," he said. "Now I'm the
president of the club."
- BRANDONSHAW

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0
6

LSA freshman Ariana Tabaku, a member of theater group The Hillel Play-
ers, acts ina play written by Steward Green and Ellie Kirn,
CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Thief on prowl
for pork chops
WHERE: East Quad Resi-
dence Hall
WHEN: Tuesday at about
11:30 a.m.
WHAT: Two pork chops
were stolen from the East
Quad dining hall, University
Police reported. Subjects
also attempted to steal two
lemonade jars. There are no
suspects.
Valet won't be
getting a tip
WHERE: M-18 Carport
WHEN: Tuesday at about
5 p.m.
WHAT: A car was damaged
after it was parked by valet,
University Police reported.
An accident report was
filed.

Patient loses 'Fat Men in Science in 15
patience Skirts' play minutes talk

WHERE: University Hos-
pital
WHEN: Tuesday at about
2:45 p.m.
WHAT: An ER patient
assaulted a hospital security
officer, University Police
reported. No medical atten-
tion was given to the officer.
Fanny pack
under attack
WHERE: Taubmen Health-
care Center
WHEN: Tuesday at about
7:45 a.m.
WHAT: Belongings were
stolen from a fanny pack in
an unlocked locker, Univer-
sity Police reported. The
fanny pack was not dam-
aged.

WHAT: "Fat Men in
Skirts," a play by Nicky Sil-
ver, will be performed. The
play is about a mother and
son who are stranded on
an deserted island for five
years.
WHO: Basement Arts
WHEN: Tonight at 7 p.m.
WHERE: Walgreen Drama
Center
Seminar on
thinking
WHAT: A workshop on
thinking patterns and how
they can create negative
emotions. Participants will
identify their thought pat-
terns and find ways to think
positively.
WHO: Counseling and Psy-
chological Services
WHEN: Today at 3 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union

WHAT: Astronomy Prof.
Gerald Smith will give a
short lecture about water's
origins on Earth.
WHO: Water Theme Semes-
ter
WHEN: Tonight at 5:30 p.m.
WHERE: Duderstadt Cen-
ter, room 1180
Faculty reading
WHAT: Authors Linda
Gregerson and Nicholas
Delbanco will read selec-
tions from their poetry and
non-fiction works.
WHO: University of Michi-
gan Museum of Art
WHEN: Tonight at 5p.m.
WHERE: University of
Michigan Museum of Art
CORRECTIONS
" Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

A new study found that
people who attend regu-
lar religious services are
more likley to become obese,
MSN reported. The study
did not determine whether
the obesity and being reli-
gious are linked.
It's been over a decade
since "Freaks and
Geeks" left the air, but
the show, starring James
Franco and Seth Rogen, still
resonates as an unflinchingly
accurate portrayal of the joys
and pains of high school.
FOR MORE, SEE THE B-SIDE, INSIDE
3Congressional Republi-
cans proposed a bill to
overturn a law signed
in 2007 that requires all
incandescent, 100-watt light
bulbs to be 30 percent more
energy efficient by 2012, Fox
News reported. These bulbs
will be more expensive and
will not last as long.

EDITORIAL STAFF
KyleSwanson ManagingEditor swanson@michigandaily.com
Nicole Aber Managing News Editor aber@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS:Bethany Biron,Dylan Cinti, Caitlin Huston, Joseph Lichterman,
Devon Thoby
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS:Rachel Brusstar, Claire Goscicki,Suzanne Jacobs, Mike
Merar, Michele Narov, Brienne Prusak, Kaitlin Williams
Michelle Dewitt and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Emilytrnley tditorialt'agetEditors
SENIOREDITORIALPAGE EDITORS:Aida AliAshleyGriesshammer,HarshaPanduranga
ASSISTANT EDITORIALPAGE EDITORS:EaghanDavis, Harsha Nahata,AndrewWeiner
Tim Rohan and sportseditors@michigandaily.com
Nick Spar ManagingSports Editors
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Mark Burns, Michael Florek, Chanel Jennings, Ryan Kartje,
Stephen J.Nesbitt, Zak Pyzik
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Emily Bonchi, Ben Estes, Casandra Pagni, Luke Pasch,
Kevin Raftery, Matt Slovin
SharonJacobs ManagingArtsEditor jacobs@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Leah Burgin, Kavi Pandey, Jennifer Xu
ASSISTANTARTS EDITORS: Joe Cadagin, Emma Gase, Proma Khosla, David Tao
Marissa McClainand photo@michigandaily.com
Jed Moch Managing PhototEditors
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITORS: Erin Kirkland, Salam Rids, Anna Schulte, SamanthaTrauben
Zach Bergsonnand design@michigandaily.com
Helen Lishlich Managing DesignuEditors
SENIR DESIGN EDITR Maya Fidmndts
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITORS: Alex Bondy, Herm6sRisien
Carolyn Klarecki MagazineEditor klarecki@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITORS:Stephen Ostrowski, Elyana Twiggs
Josh Healy and copydesk@michigandaily.com
Eileen Patten Copy chiefs
Sarah Squire webevelopment Manager squire@michigandaily.com
BUSINESS STAFF
Julianna Crim Sales Manager
SALES FORCE MANAGER:Stephanie Bowkser
Hillary Szawala Classifieds Manager
CLASSIFIED ASSISTANT MANAGER: Ardie Reed
Alexis Newton Production Manager
Meghan Rooney Layout Manager
Nick Meshkin Finance Manager
Trevor Grieband Quy VO Circulation Managers
Zach Yancerweb Project coordinator
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the university of Michigan. One copy is avalable free of charge
to all readers. Additional copiesmay be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for
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subsitonrate.O-npuubs onsforel tem arne$AStscipetoeutepreaid
Theoihian Daly ,is ebetfTheAssociatei PressssndTelAssociatetolegaterss.

C h .-_ , .'.' .-.,-"^.-er "r
Children's Mirandarights
argued in Supreme Court

Court considers if
age is a factor in
police questioning
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Supreme Court delved yesterday
into two cases involving the wel-
fare of children, including one
where justices seemed ready to
force courts to consider age when
examining whether a child is in
custody and must be given Miran-
da rights.
The justices wrestled with
whether a child, in this case a
seventh-grade special education
student, could understand he was
free to end police questioning and
leave, a key indicator of whether
someone is in custody.
In the second case, the court
appeared unlikely to rule that
delinquent parents must be given
a lawyer before judges can jail
them for not paying child support.
The special education student,
known as JDB in court papers was

13 in 2005 when he confessed to a
rash of break-ins in Chapel Hill,
N.C. while interviewed in a closed
room at his school by police and
school officials.
JDB's lawyer challenged the
use of his confessions. Previ-
ous court rulings have required
Miranda warnings before police
interrogations for people who are
in custody, which is defined as
when a reasonable person would
think he cannot end the question-
ing and leave.
The North Carolina Supreme
Court refused to throw the con-
fession out, saying the youth was
never actually in custody since he
had not been formally restrained
and the door to the room was not
guarded. It also said courts can-
not look at age when examining
whether the boy thought he could
leave.
The court's four liberal-lean-
ing justices, as well as the more
conservative Anthony Kennedy,
seemed uncomfortable with this
idea during the argument.

"Just as a matter of common
sense, how can you say we're
going to have the same test for
this 8-year-old as we would for
the 30-year-old?" Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg said.
Judges take into account
whether a person speaks English
and a person's physical shortcom-
ings - such as deafness - when
determining whether someone
thinks he is in custody, said Jus-
tice Stephen Breyer.
"There are all these things
around that might suggest to
a 20-year-old, yeah, you could
leave, but to a 12-year-old, 'no,"
Breyer said.
But the court's conserva-
tive justices argued that making
police officers consider age when
they question children could raise
challenges in other situations.
"If age should be one of the
factors deciding whether the
individual regarded himself as
in custody or not, why shouldn't
mental deficiency be so as well?"
Justice Antonin Scalia said.

0

Produce manager Dave Richards organizes produce at Dahl's grocery store yesterday in Des Moines, Iowa.
egeta e prices eXpected
to drop soon, grocers say

America saw largest
increase in food
prices since 1970s
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (AP) - A
nearly 50 percent increase in
vegetable prices that has sen

r

LIVE WELL
LEARN WELl
CLOSE TO U OF M
NORTH CAMPUS
AFFORDABLE RATES
ON SHUTTLE
BUS ROUTE

-11

shoppers reeling in the produce
aisle should ease in the coming
weeks as farmers send grocers
more tomatoes, lettuce and other
crops.
Vegetable prices shot up last
month after cold weather in
the southern U.S. and Mexico
t destroyed much of the winter
vegetable supply, the Commerce
Department said. From tomatoes
in Florida to lettuce in Arizona,
fruit and vegetables became
frostbitten,~and prices rose for
the produce farmers could save.
Costs should be coming down
Ihe new Line
iGarden Specing
in ong Kong
Hunan &
SteChuan
(734) 995 1401 SM ny
116 S.Main St. vegetarian
(Between W. Huron and dshes
Washtenaw) Carryout
ad resrvatolnsaccepted.
Weserve alcohol Mon-Thir 11-0
Fri&Sat 11-11
Open 7 Da Sun 12-li

soon, though, as crops farmers
planted after the winter freezes
start to reach stores, said grow-
ers, grocers and analysts. Grocers
also typically switch this time of
year to crops planted for spring,
said Jody Shee, an analyst for the
market research firm Mintel.
"Unless there are any other
weather issues, the prices should
bounce back pretty soon," she
said.
The Iowa-based Hy-Vee
supermarket chain, which has
more than 230 stores in the Mid-
west, already is seeing cheaper
prices for lettuce, broccoli and
other vegetables, spokeswoman
Ruth Comer said. But tomatoes
and cucumbers, which were hit
hard by cold weather in Mexico,
could remain high for one more
month, she said.
Vegetables imported from
Mexico often offset losses in
the U.S. during winter freezes,
but that wasn't the case this
year because the cold stretched
further south than usual, said
Gary Lucier, an agricultural
economist with the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture's Economic
Research Service.
The result was the biggest
one-month increase in overall
food prices Americans have seen
since 1974 and the steepest rise in
U.S. inflation in nearly two years.

01

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