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March 24, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-03-24

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1 i 1*Iiian 0)a i~jj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, March 24, 2011

michigandaily.com

RELIEF EFFORTS
'U' students,
faculty band
together to
assist Japan

Japan Student
* Association,
UMHS fundraise to
support victims
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily StaffReporter
In Japanese culture, if a person
folds 1,000 origami cranes, his or
her wishes come true. And so, as
they wish for relief for victims
of the recent disasters in Japan,
members of the Japan Student
Association on campus have
begun creating the small paper
birds.
The "1,000 cranes" project is
just one of several relief efforts by
the University community to help
Japan after the country's recent
string of natural and man-made
disasters. Other student groups
as well as the University of Michi-
gan Health System have been bol-
stering support for the victims of
the 9.0-magnitude earthquake on
March 11 and a subsequent tsu-
nami with 10-meter waves. The
country is now facing a combined
toll of more than 25,000 dead or
missing people.
Engineering junior Yoshiki
Masada, president of the Japan

Student Association, said the
organization is engaged in a vari-
ety of fundraising efforts to help
victims of the disaster in Japan. It
is alsoworking with several other
campus organizations, including
the Tzu Chi Collegiate Founda-
tion and the Malaysian Student
Association, to make the endeav-
ors even more successful.
"We don't see the point if
everyone's just doing their own
thing," Masada said.
Representatives from sev-
eral of the organizations have
been collecting donations on the
Diag and in front of the restau-
rant Sushi.com to help victims of
the earthquake and tsunami in
Japan, Masada said. The groups'
fundraising efforts have raised
more than $5,000, he said. The
organizations will also be selling
bracelets and T-shirts that say
"Pray for Japan" next week in
Angell Hall.
UMHS spokeswoman Kara
Gavin said members of the health
system are collecting medical
supplies and bottled water to
donate to relief efforts in Japan.
She added that UMHS is asking
all its departmentsto collect reus-
able equipment such as crutches
or spare supplies like injury
dressings to send to Japan.
See JAPAN, Page 5A

ALDEN REISS/Daily
University President Mary Sue Coleman talks to students and Ann Arbor residents after Coleman's monthly fireside chat at the Northwood Community Center
yesterday. Coleman spoke with students about concerns regarding North Campus.
Coleman talks North
Campus issues at chat

Students express
concerns about
Northwood housing
By JOSEPH LICHTERMAN
Daily News Editor
University President Mary
Sue Coleman visited the North-
wood Community Center on
North Campus for the first time
yesterday to host her monthly

fireside chat with students.
About 20 undergraduate and
graduate students joined Cole-
man and E. Royster Harper,
the University's vice president
of student affairs, for the talk.
Students discussed a variety of
topics including the Michigan
basketball team and the Uni-
versity's switch to the Common
Application, but the informal
conversation was focused on
several issues pertaining to
North Campus.

One of the issues was the new
Northwood Houses - residence
halls in the Northwood Com-
munity Apartments that were
designated for freshmen after
about 500 more students than
expected enrolled last fall.
"In the last couple of years
we've over-admitted students
because our yields have been
higher than we've predicted,"
Coleman said. "So, last fall, 500
students showed up that we
weren't expecting ... This was

something we had to scramble
about."
Undergraduate students and
resident advisers living in the
Northwood Houses - located
within Northwood I and II -
said they were surprised by how
much they enjoyed living there.
Still, they said several improve-
ments could be made to the
apartment-style residence hall.
Engineering junior Ryan
Lumley, an resident adviser
See COLEMAN, Page SA

UNIVERSIY ACADEMICS
LSA concentrations change course
requirements at introductory level

MICHIGAN FOOTBALL
Football ticket prices
increase for students

English, Spanish,
physics majors
to be altered in fall
By RAYZA GOLDSMITH
Daily StaffReporter
Students looking to start ful-
filling their Spanish, English or
physics majors may find their
concentration requirements are

different than they originally
anticipated.
Beginning in the fall 2011
semester, the programs will have
new concentration requirements.
Most ofthe changes willbe to the
concentration prerequisites, with
some of the alterations regarding
the number of classes a student
will need before declaring their
major.
The Department of English
Language and Literature pre-

viously had two prerequisites
classes for its undergraduate
concentration - English 297:
Introduction to Poetry and Eng-
lish 298: Introduction to Literary
Studies. However, the depart-
ment decided to remove the
poetry class as a prerequisite and
instead make ita requirement for
concentrators to take a higher
level poetry class once they have
already declared.
See LSA, Page 5A

Extra revenue
will be used for
stadium updates
By PAIGE PEARCY
Daily StaffReporter
Mirroring the upward trend
in the Michigan football team's
performance, the price of stu-
dent tickets is on the rise for the
second straight year.
Wolverine fans wanting to
spend their Saturdays at the Big

House this fall will have to shell
out a heftier sum. Students will
have to pay $240 - plus pro-
cessing fees - for season tick-
ets, which is about a 21-percent
increase, or $43 greater than,
the 2010 season ticket price.
University Athletic Depart-
ment spokesman Dave Ablauf
wrote in an e-mail interview
that the price increase was nec-
essary because the season ticket
price last year was below mar-
ket value.
"We benchmarked our sea-
son ticket prices against all of

our peers and found that we
had fallen significantly below
competitive market prices, both
in student season tickets and
general season tickets," Ablauf
wrote. "We made a modest
increase to the season ticket per
game."
The price bump is also due
to an increase in the number
of home games from seven to
eight, including the first-ever
night game against Notre Dame
on Sept. 10 and the home game
against Ohio State on Nov. 26,
See FOOTBALL, Page 5A

STAT E BU DG E T
Gov. Snyder faces national criticism
for EFM law, higher education cuts

BY THE NUMBERS Michigan football season ticket prices per game

Despite budget
cuts, spokesman
says governor
'values education'
By HALEY GLATTHORN
Daily StaffReporter
Republican Gov. Rick Snyder
has faced criticism from the
University community and the

state for his tax plans and pro-
posal to cut 15 percent of higher
education fundingsince his bud-
get proposal was released last
month. Most recently, the first-
term governor has garnered
national attention on MSNBC.
The network's "The Rachel
Maddow Show" aired a video
titled "Michigan is Screwed"
earlier this month condemn-
ing several of Snyder's pro-
posed policies. With more than
760,000 views on YouTube, the

video discusses legislation that
will allow the state to replace
publicly elected officials with
emergency financial managers
appointed by Snyder's admin-
istration if a city is in danger
of bankruptcy or facing serious
financial strife.
Despite objections from Mad-
dow and Michigan residents
who claim the legislation is a
threat to democratic princi-
pals, Snyder spokesman Ryan
See SNYDER, Page 5A

$50
$40
$30
$20
2008 2009 2010 2011
YEAR
G- Reglar seasonUickets - Sudentseasntickts
GuRPIC BYSARAHuSQUIRE

MICHIGAN ILLINOIS INDIANA

IOWA MSU OHIO STATE
A comparison of Michigan student season ticket prices
per football game to five other Big Ten schools in 2010.
DATA FROM MULTIPLE SOURCES

WEATHER HI: 32
TOMORROW LO:19

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INDEX AP NEWS..
Vol. CXXI,No.h116 NEWS .....
©211 The Michigan Daily O P i INI O N..
michigondoily.com

.A CLASSIFIEDS......
.5A SPORTS ..............
.4A THE B-SIDE........

.6A
.7A
..1B

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