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February 02, 2011 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2011-02-02

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ONEUNIREI)[ TWENY ONEIYEARS OF E)IT RIA L ER EE)OM

* Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

michigandaly.com

SNOWPOCALYPSE

CAMPUS COMMUNITY
Chinese
students
find nich.
at the 'U'

People cross the Diag last night in the middle of the snowstorm that's estimated to dump 18-24 inches of snow on Detroit and the Southeast Michigan region.
While many colleges throughout Michigan and the Midwest canceled classes today, the University's Ann Arbor campus will continue to hold classes.
BLIZZARD 2011
Campussevere-weather policy
-mandates faculty atnac

International
Chinese student
enrollment on the
rise throughout U.S.
By MICHELE NAROV
Daily Staff Reporter
Engineering senior Wandi'
Lin's adjustment to life in Ann
Arbor wasn't easy.
After traveling halfway
around the world to pursue a
dual degree at the University and
at Shanghai University in China,
Lin still had to learn the basics
of American culture. Every-
thing from the rules of American
sports to small talk with class-
mates was unfamiliar.
Lin is one of thousands of Chi-
nese students seeking a college
degree in the United States.
During the 2009-2010 aca-
demic year, Chinese students
became the largest population of
international students studying
in the United States, according
to the Institute of International
Education's annual Open Doors
Report. Chinese enrollment

incease . jpnyercentlast year,
according to the report.
However, this national trend
isn't new to the University.
John Greisberger, director of
the University's International
Center, said Chinese studentp
have made up the majority of
international students on cam-
pus for nearly a decade.
"There's been a steady
growth," Greisberger said, "but
it's been at the top of our list for
the last tenyears."
According to a Dec. 9 article in
The Michigan Daily, there were
1,227 international Chinese stu-
dents studying at the University
during the 2008-2009 academic
year - an increase of 227 stu-
dents from the previous academ-
icyear.
Last year, the- University
ranked sixth in the nation for
attracting international stu-
dents, the Open Doors Report
states. And the University was
ranked first in the number of
international students study-
ing in the state, according to the
report.
According to the report, 24.1
percent of international students
See STUDENTS, Page A

Flint, Dearborn
classes canceled,
A2 remains open
By ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily StaffReporter
Even before the snowstorm
made its way into the Ann Arbor
area last night, University offi-

-ctlsrar''ed-'hinking abon"the'the University's Ann Arbor
blizzard's possible effects. campus is open today, though
The University issued a state- classes are canceled at the Uni-
ment of its severe-weather versity's Flint and Dearborn
policy on the University Record campuses.
website yesterday to remind The University hasn't had a
employees about the Univer- snow day since 1978, according
sity's severe weather policy, to several previous Michigan
asking them to "make every rea- Daily reports.
sonable effort to get to campus In a Feb. 2010 interview,
so that essential services can be University spokeswoman Kelly
maintained." Cunningham said the likeli-

hood of the Universitycanceling
classes at its Ann Arbor campus
would be very rare since most
students live on or close to cam-
pus.
"We basically never cancel
classes because we're a residen-
tial school," Cunningham said.
"People can get here."
University employees who
don't show up for work today
See POLICY, Page SA

PEACE CORPS
'U' has third-most undergrad
alumni in the Peace Corps

Vo
'

Number of yesterday.
The Peace Corps annual
lunteers from rankings, which were released
yesterday, show that 94 alumni
fourth largest who attended the University
for undergraduate school are
to date currently volunteering with
the organization. The Univer-
SUZANNE JACOBS sity tied for third place with the
Daily StaffReporter University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill and the University
e University sends the of Washington, which also sent
most number of alumni to 94 volunteers.
eace Corps, according to a The University of Colorado-
rsity press release issued See PEACE CORPS, Page SA

BY THE NUMBERS
'U' Peace Corp Involvement
9 4 Undergraduate
4 alumni in Peace
Corpsothisyear
Graduatealumni in
15 Peace Corp
this year
V Peace Corps
2 A09 participants
since its founding

By
The
third-
the Pe
Unive

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH
'U' researchers discover DNA's ability
to change shape through movement
Scientists find sity researchers in Nature. cally layered according to the
RPQ rh~ imd milp nitin of it, mul nidi ndP

TheRide's Transit Master Plan Project Coordinator Michael Benham gives a presentation about the plan yesterday.
AATA mulls three 30-
year transit proposals

molecules in
DNA not rigid
By CLAIRE GOSCICKI
Daily StaffReporter
DNA, the building block of
the human genome, has the abil-
ity to change shape in unusual
ways, according to an article
published last week by Univer-

Kesearcners usea nuclear
magnetic resonance technol-
ogy, which is similar to a small-
scale MRI imaging machine,
to observe movements in indi-
vidual bases in strands of DNA.
It was then that University
researcher Hashim Al-Hashi-
mi, a University professor of
chemistry and biophysics, and
his team discovered something
strange going on.
A molecule of DNA is typi-

position of is nucieotiaes aae
nine, cytosine, guanine and thy-
mine, which are abbreviated as
A, C, G and T, respectively. The
DNA double helix resembles the
shape of a spiral staircase, but
according to the research of Al-
Hashimi and his colleagues, the
various steps of this staircase
are not rigid.
Al-Hashimi, who is the Uni-
versity's Robert L. Kuczkowski
See DNA, Page SA

Different plans
estimated to cost
millions of dollars
By K.C.WASSMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Last night the Ann Arbor
Transit Authority held one of
a series of public meetings to
discuss its long-term vision for
transit countywide.

The focus of the meeting,
held at the Ann Arbor District
Library with about 15 people in
attendance, was to get commu-
nity input on the AATA Transit
Master Plan, a 30-year plan to
address transportation issues in
the county.
The AATA is currently con-
sidering three different plans
it could implement, according
to officials at the meeting. The
three plans under consideration
are the Lifeline Plus Scenario,

the Accessible County Scenario
and the Smart Growth Scenar-
io. Each of the plans includes
improvements to buses, inte-
grated ticketing, travel planning
programs and door-to-door ser-
vice for seniors as well as for
people with disabilities.
The AATA's decision of which
plan to adopt is expected to be
made by March or April, accord-
ing to Mary Stasiak, AATA's
manager of community rela-
aSee T NSIT, Page $A

WEATHER HI:18
TOMORROW LO: 6

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