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November 22, 2010 - Image 1

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michigandaily.com

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 22, 2010

* ELECTION 2010
City business
* leaders hope
Snyder's plans
will boost A2

Republican's tax
revamp will attract
businesses to Ann
Arbor, officials say
By ELYANA TWIGGS
Daily StaffReporter
"Optimistic" is the word that
Kyle Mazurek, the vice president
of government affairs for the Ann
Arbor Chamber of Commerce,
uses to describe the feelings most
Ann Arbor business owners have
about governor-elect Rick Sny-
der taking office on Jan. 1.
"We are doing everything we
can to support him," Mazurek
said. "We want to see him suc-
ceed, and we want to see the state
succeed."
Business owners throughout
the city say they're excited for
Snyder to take office because
they anticipate his business
experience and potential tax pol-
icies could draw new businesses
to the area and boost Ann Arbor's
economy.
"The bottom line for every-
body is getting Michigan mov-
ing in the right direction,"

Mazurek said.
However, Mazurek said he
isn't sure if Snyder's promises on
the campaign trail will come to
fruition during his term.
"We are at a point in time
where he is coming off the elec-
tion cycle and campaign and
starting to fully flesh out some
of the ideas he talked about in
a broad sense during the cam-
paign," he said.
One of Snyder's ideas is to
eliminate the current corporate
business income tax and replace
it with a new six-percent flat
corporate income tax. The tax
would exclude some small busi-
nesses and reduce business taxes
by about $1.5 billion.
Mazurek said this proposed
policy is one of the reasons peo-
ple in the business community
voted for Snyder.
Though Snyder's ideas to stim-
ulate the economy are currently
conceptual, Mazurek said Snyder
has a plan to create a more effi-
cient government so that citizens
get "more bang for (their) tax-
payer dollar."
He added that Snyder's lack of
political experience helped him
win votes.
See SNYDER, Page 7A

JAKt FROMM/Daily
Michigan safety Jordan Kovacs (32), Michigan linebacker Kenny Demens (25), and Michigan safety Courtney Avery (5) play against Wisconsin at the Big Hose Satardayy
The Badgers beat the Wolverines in the last home game of the season 48-28. For more on the game, see SportsMonday, inside.
Why it's OK to feel sorry

Poor Rich
Standi
after the
team's 48-28 los
senior day, the c
gling to answer
about his team's
thereof.
Well, that's n
coach wasn't str
answer the quer
the answer. Rea
it all season. He
of it after JT Tu

for Rich Rodriguez
Rodriguez. Emilien left years," Rodriguez said. "I've never wouldn't be touci
ng at the podium the team this had a year where I've had this with a 39.5-foot p
Michigan football summer, and many guys at key positions and they're starting.
s to Wisconsin on after senior certain spots (get injured)." So, when Rodr
oach was strug- cornerback The injuries and departures about why his def
pointed questions Troy Wool- in the defensive backfield have struggled so migi
defense, or lack folk went been well documented. Fresh- knows the anwe
down with an JOE men like cornerback Courtney They're injured.'
ot right - the ankle injury, STALETON Avery, safety Ray Vinopal and Sure, they're lear
uggling to it became a cornerback Terrence Talbott have Big Ten there's n
stions. He knew little clearer. fought hard and played to the best If you're on the fi
illy, he's known But lately, it's been getting of their abilities, but they're still know.
had an inkling . ridiculous. 18- and 19-year-old kids. Under The answer pr
irner and Vlad "It's just one of those crazy normal circumstances, these guys See STAI

hing the field
pole. This year,
iguez is asked
fense has
htily this year, he
C: they're young.
There's no depth.
ning but in the
o time to learn.
eld, you should
esents a dilemma
PLETON, Page 8A

! SUDENT GOVRnMN
Turnout in fall elections
up slightly from last year

Election director
says he hoped for
more than 10.2
percent turnout
By RACHEL BRUSSTAR
Daily StaffReporter
After collaborative efforts
between the Michigan Student
Assembly, LSA Student Govern-
ment and University of Michigan

Engineering Council, voter turn-
out in student government elec-
tions last week was up from last
year - though student govern-
ment officials say they'd like to
see an even bigger increase next
election cycle.
Fall student government elec-
tions, which took place last week,
saw an increase in voter turn out,
rising from 8.9 percent to 10.2
percent.
While the different student
governments across campus
have previously campaigned for

their individual elections, MSA,
LSA-SG and UMEC decided to
combine budgets and campaign
efforts in an attempt to get more
students to the online polls.
In an interview yesterday,
Sagar Deshpande, MSA elections
director, spoke about the assem-
bly's reaction to the voter turnout
in this election in comparison to
other years.
"While the increase isn't as
largeas we hoped, we are glad to
see anincrease," Deshpande said.
See ELECTION, Page 8A

LSA senior Kate Pawlukiewicz said she keeps her mutt Aliein her home on Packard Street that allows pets.
For many students, owning a pet
is worth breaking landlord's rules

'U' economists: Downturn's worst over

Landlords, animal
experts say balance
between college,
furry friends difficult
By DAVID BUCCILLI
Daily StaffReporter
While some students engage
in illegal activities like under-
age drinking and drug use, others
break the rules in order to cuddle

up with a furry friend.
Students living in off-campus
housing say they've hid their pets
from landlords with no-pet poli-
cies. Though these students say the
benefits of owning a pet are great-
er than the punishment of being
caught, landlords, animal experts
and student pet owners say balanc-
ing a college lifestyle with raising a
pet can often be difficult.
"I just wish that more landlords
would be open to having dogs,"
said one LSA sophomore dog
owner who asked to remain annony-

mous because the owner is illegally
keeping a yellow lab named Trap-
per in an apartment.
The owner said hiding the dog is
"worth the risk" of repercussions.
According to a sample lease
posted on the website of Prime
Student Housing, tenants found
with unauthorized pets will be
considered "in default of the lease."
In addition, tenants found with
pets will be charged $50 the first
time the landlord spots the petand
any subsequent sightings. Tenants
See PETS, Page 7A

At panel, economists
also talk future of
U.S. economy
By AUSTINWORDELL
For the Daily
The worst of the recession is
over, according to economists
from the University, think tanks
and government organizations
who spoke at a two-day confer-
ence held at Rackham late last

week.
Economists expressed a mod-
est yet hopeful outlook on the
economy at the University of
Michigan's 58th Annual Eco-
nomic Outlook Conference spon-
sored by the Research Seminar
in Quantitative Economics. The
conference took place all day
Thursday and Friday morning
and attracted dozens of attendees
from various industries and sec-
tors.
Economists Joan Crary, Daniil
Manaenkov and Stanley Sedo -

all assistant research scientists at
the RSQE - presented The U.S.
Economic Outlook for 2011-2012.
In their report, the economists
predicted that the U.S. economy
would add 900,000 jobs by the
end of 2010 and another 1.5 mil-
lion jobs in 2011 - along with 2.4
million jobs in 2012. Nearly all
forecasts at the conference pre-
dicted job growth in the next few
years, but experts said the gains
still wouldn't offset the 8 million
jobs lost between the end of 2007
See ECONOMY, Page 7A

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