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November 18, 2010 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2010-11-18

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PR EPPING FOR POTTER,
: Harry returns to the screen at midnight

,y
s
k
w'
_ ,
' :
t.
a

The Program in
the Environment
major isn't just
for hippies, take
Will Grundler's
word for it.
))PAGE 4A

tonight, and muggles all over campus are
getting ready to go back to Hogwarts.

PAGE 4B

~be £id~iqan 0i~

Thursday, November 18, 2010

michigandaily.com

ELECTION 2010
Experts: GOP
gains won't
affect student
aid legislation

Congress unlikely to
alter youth portions of
health care, financial
aid bills, experts say
By BETHANY BIRON
. Daily StaffReporter
Major advances for young people
in financial aid and health care leg-
islation shouldn't be significantly
affected by Republicans gaining
control of the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives and adding seats in
the U.S. Senate, according to local
experts and University officials.
Instead, those experts said the
political shift will increase the
need for compromise between
the parties on some of the most
pertinent legislation pushed by
president ta-ack Obamd and his
administration. They added that
Republicans will resist significant
changes to recently passed finan-
cial aid and health care legislation,
largely because a repeal of these
bills requires the use of more fed-
eral funding.
Cindy Bank, assistant director of
the University's government rela-
tions Washington D.C. office, said
she doesn't anticipate that Republi-
cans will try to reverse financial aid
legislation enacted by the Obama
administration, including . the

Direct LoanProgram, which pro-
vides funding to students directly
from the government and bypasses
the use of private institutions.
. "I don't foresee the Republi-
cans trying to undo the direct loan
provision because that would cost
money," Bank said. "And right now
they're looking at ways to cut the
budget, not increase the .budget.
And overall, the switch to direct
lending has been going very well."
However, Banks said it is pos-
sible that Republicans in Congress
will cut down on the increased
funding for Pell Grants established
by the Obama administration.
She added that the funding could
become less available to students
in an effort to offset the nearly $6
billion that the grants contribute to
the national deficit.
"The Pell Grant is a funny sort'
of program on how it's funded,
becaUse it's basically an entitle-
ment," Bank said. "And so, if a
student qualifies for a Pell Grant
they're going to get it, whether the
money's been appropriated or not.
And that leads to a shortfall some-
times, especially recently, when
there's so many more students in
school and so many more students
in need."
Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of
finaid.org, a financial aid infor-
mation site for students, said he
believes that Pell Grant rates and
See GOP, Page 5A

SAMANTHA TRAUBEN/Daily
Engineering senior Alex Sloboda models parts of the University's first student-built satellite (left) yesterday at the Radio Aurora Explorer lab on North Campus. The
satellite is slated to launch from Alaska on Friday.
In 'U' firstsatellite developed
by students to launch on Friday

Radio Aurora
Explorer built by
undergraduate and
graduate students
By CLAIRE GOSCICKI
Daily StaffReporter
In the Radio Aurora Explorer
team's North Campus lab, high
tech receivers, antennas, and solar
panels are commonplace materi-
als.
Each component, combined

with the talents of Radio Aurora
Explorer (RAX) team members,
has the potential to become a part
of a fully functioning spacecraft -
but not without a crucial ingredi-
ent.
For Engineering senior Alex
Sloboda, that crucial component is
passion.
Sloboda was responsible for var-
ious aspects of the development of
the RAX - the University's first
ever student-built satellite, which
is set to launch Friday - and he
said he has spent a lot of time in the
North Campus lab since his fresh-
men year.

"University of Michigan stu-
dents really put their blood, sweat
and tears into the spacecraft," he
said. "Everything we've worked
for over the past 2 years ... has
finally paid off."
Team member Sara Spangelo, a
student in Rackham, echoed Slo-
boda's sentiments, adding that in
a lab where cooperation and col-
laboration is the norm, the col-
lective excitement that has been
surrounding the project will reach
a new high when the satellite
launches from Kodiak, Alaska at
about 8:20 p.m. on Friday.
Spangelo, Sloboda, and oth-

ers will, after much anticipation,
gather tomorrow on campus to see
RAX's missiaB tO terib - dtt
endeavor nearly two years in the
making.
Funded entirely by the National
Science Foundation, the proposal
for the mission was developed by
James Cutler an assistant profes-
sor of aerospace engineering and
atmospheric, oceanic and space
science, and Hasan Bahcivan, a
research scientist at SRI Interna-
tional.
Spangelo said undergraduate
and graduate students worked
See SATELLITE, Page SA

MR. STUB GOES TO THE UNION

'U' will consult tribes before
repatriating human remains

SMOLsON/Da i
Forafullstorynthe Uniuersity's - School of Public Health student Katie Waller (left), University health edu-
"Smoke Out"event yesterday, visit cator Marsha Benz and "Mr. Stub" work at a table in the basement of the
michigandaily.com/blogs/The Wire w ire Michigan Union giving out smoking cessation aids yesterday.
GREEK LIFE
IFC, Panhel elect new presidents

Re
app
B
As t
policy
remain
Forrest
dent fo
day in.

search VP also will discuss all actions with the
affiliated tribes before repatriating
roves committee the remains.
A March 15 federal court ruling
suggestions requires the University to return
unidentifiable cultural remains to
y CAITLIN HUSTON the tribe that historically resided
Daily StaffReporter on the land where the remains were
found.
:he University formalizes its The Native American Grave
on Native American human Protection and Repatriation Act, a
is in its possession, Stephen federal law in place since 1990, also
, the University's vice presi- calls on museums to keep public
r research, announced yester- lists of Native American artifacts
a press release that his office and remains in their possession. The

act requires museums to work with
tribes to determine what repatria-
tionofobjectsis necessary.
In his announcement yesterday,
Forrest also approved the nine sug-
gestions of the Advisory Commit-
tee on Native American Culturally
Unidentifiable Remains. Established
by Forrest in October 2009, the com-
mittee outlined the procedure it
feels the University should follow
in returning human remains and
funerary objects currently housed in
the University's Museum of Anthro-
See TRIBES, Page SA

Amid campus bustle, Muslim Students'
Association pushes for reflection rooms

Leaders say they'll
promote a positive
image on campus
By SABIRA KHAN
Daily StaffReporter
The two largest Greek organi-
zations on campus elected their
new leadership teams in a set
of elections this week with the

incoming presidents of both.coun-
cils vowing to promote a more
positive image on campus and in
the community.
The Panhellenic Assocation,
the umbrella organization of 16 of
the University's sororities, elect-
ed LSA junior Taylor Schmidt
as its new president, while the
Interfraternity Council, the gov-
erning organization for 31 of the
University's fraternities, elected
LSA junior Jared Jaffe as its next

president.
At IFC's elections last night,
Jaffe stressed the need for IFC to
be more vocal and assertive as a
community.
"I would say that my main goal
is to make sure that the next coun-
cil is more vocal, because there's
nothing worse than wasted poten-
tial, wasted opportunities and
ideas that many of you held and
many of your predecessors held,"
See ELECTIONS, Page SA

Rooms with benches,
carpets in UGLi,
Michigan League
By CLAIRE HALL
For the Daily
A sign outside a small room
tucked away on the ground floor of
the Shapiro Undergraduate Library

reads, "This room has been made
available for students and mem-
bers of the University community
to meditate, pray, and otherwise
spend time in quiet reflection."
Room 1074 of the UGLi is one
of eight reflection r'aoms on cam-
pus, meant to be places for quiet
contemplation and meditation.
Often furnished with only rugs and
benches, the rooms provide seclu-
sion from the everyday bustle of

campus activity.
The Office of the Vice President
forStudentAffairs andtheAssocia-
tionof Religious Counselors collab-
orated to open the University's first
reflection room in Room 347 of the
Michigan League in January 2003.
Since then, seven more reflection
rooms have been established across
campus at locations like the Chem-
istry Building, Ross School of Busi-
See ROOMS, Page SA

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INDEX NEWS................2A CLASSIFIEDS........,.............6A
Vol. CXXI No. 51 AP NEW S ................ ..3A SPO RTS.,... ............... .... .7A
x201 The MichiganoDaily OPINIONT..........B
micianduilycum4A T EB S D ........ ......11

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