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January 29, 2010 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2010-01-29

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2 - Friday, January 29, 2010
MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

TUESDAY:
Professor Profiles

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
JACOB SMILOVITZ DAN NEWMAN
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-647-3336 734-764-0558
smilovitz@michigandaily.com tmdbusiness@gmaif.com
CONTACT INFORMATION
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Sports Section
Display Sales
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NEED MORE PHOTOS?
See so many more photos of the week
on our website, michigandailycom.

LEFT Cadence Dance Company performs at the Mendelson Theatre on Saturday. The modern dance group performed pieces set to MGMT and The Beatles. (MIA MARINO/Daily) TOP
MIDDLE Jeremy Raiford, a campus DPS officer, on a recent patrol. (SAM WOLSON/Daily) TOP RIGHT Engineering senior Jerome Singleton prepares to run in the indoor track and field
building on Tuesday. (MARISSA MCCLAIN/Daily). BOTTOM RIGHT In Stamps Auditorium on Monday, School of Music sophomore Charles Mann takes instruction from Carol Jants,
who teaches a tuba class in the school. (ANNA SCHULTE/Daily).

CRIME NOTES
Cash, cologne Money taken

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Folk festival Master's piano

taken from room
WHEN: Wednesday around 7
p.m.
WHERE: East Quad
WHAT: A, student reported
$300 and expensive cologne
stolen from his suitcase, which
was in his locked dorm room,
University police reported.
There are no suspects.
Drunk on 'U' bus
cited for an MIP
WHEN: Yesterday around 1
a.m.
WHERE: Aboard a University
bus
WHAT: An t8-year-old male
student was intoxicated on the
bus and taken to the emergen-
cy room by an ambulance, Uni-
versity police reported. He was
cited for an MIP.

from purse
WHEN: Wednesday around
4:30 p.m.
WHERE: University Hospital
WHAT: $50 was stolen from
an unattended purse at an
unknown date or time, Univer-
sity police reported.
Van hits flashing
sign crosswalk
signal
WHEN: Wednesday around
1:30 p.m.
WHERE: University Hospital
WHAT: A van struck a flash-
ing road crosswalk signal,
University police reported.
The Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment was notified to make the
repairs, estimated to be about
$1,000.

WHAT: The 33rd annual recital
folk festival will kick off its
first night with performanc- WHAT: Smit
es by Iron and Wine, Jay Far- pieces by B
rar and Benjamin Gibbard, Liszt in this m
Band of Heathens, Hoots WHO: Cahill
& Hellmouth, Po' Girl, Jer WHEN: 8 p.m
Coons, Nervous But Excited WHERE: E.V
and Patty Larkin, MC. ing
WHO: Michigan Union
Ticket Office, The Ark
WHEN: 6:30 p.m. CORRECTIONS
WHERE: Hill Auditorium A

h will perform
eethoven and
aster's recital.
Smith
.
1. Moore Build-
invenro'

An man in Austrailia was
pulled over for blowing his
nose while driving, news.
com.au reported. The police
officer told him that he did
not have control of the vehicle.
He refused to pay the fine and
plans on taking the ticket to
court.
In 2008, Michigan spent
22 percent of its budget
on the corrections sys-
tem, according to the National
Institute of Corrections, mak-
ing it one of five states that
spends more money on correc-
tions than higher education.
>FOR MORE,SEE OPINION, PAGE4.
A city in Russia is sell-
ing a bronze statue of
Vladimir Lenin beause it -
has become too expensive to
keep up the maintenance on
it, Yahoo! reported. The buyer
must be able to pay for repairs
to the statue.

Online Sales onlineads@michigandaily.com
Finance finance@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Matt Aaronson Managing Editor aaronson@nichigandaily.com
Lillian Berman Managing News Editor bermah@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Nicole Aber, Mallory Jones, Stephanie Steinberg, Kyle
Swanson, EshwaroThirunavukkarasu
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Dylan Cinti, Darryn Fitzgerald, Joseph Lichterman,
VeronicaeMenaldi,AnnieThomas,DevonThorsby,ElyannaTwiggs
RacheliVan Gilder Editorial PageEditor vangilder@michigandaily.com
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Brian Flaherty, ErikaMayer,EmilyOrley, Laura
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Michelle DeW itt,Alex Schiff, MatthewShutler
Ryan Kartje Managing sports Editor kartje@mnichigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Nicole Auerbach, Mark Burns, Gjon Juncaj, Chris
Meszaros, Joe Stapleton
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Michael Florek, Alex Hermann, Ryan Podges, Zak
laBietlock Mang rtsEditor block@michigandaily.com
oSENOR ARSoEDIORS:aol~yrnKlrcki,ndr~e ai,Jef nford
ASITANT RTEITORS:ah Bgnha Ar on J acosBiidKloin, Mike Kuntz,
KavishekharPandey
MaxCollinsand photo@michigandaily.com
SanWulson ManagingPhotoEditors
SENIR PHOTOEDTOR FRMULTIMEDIA: Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:AaronAugsburger,JakeFromm, JedMuch
SarahSquireand design@michigandaily.com
Anna Lein-Zielinski ManagingDesign Editors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Angela Chih
TrevorCalero Magazine Editor calero@michigandailycom
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR: Allie White
MelanieyFrieda ndcopydesk@michigandaily.com
Rcbel Phillips CopyoChiefs
BUSINESS STAFF
Katie lowiak SalesManaer
SAE FRE MANAGER: Moly Twigg
MARKETINGMANAGER: Michael Schrotenboer
Ryan Businski Classified Manager
CLASSIFI ED ASSISTANT MANAGER: Kayla LaFata
Ben English Production Manager
Allison Santacreu LayoutManager
Vivian Lee Finance Manager
Brittany Morales circulation Manager
Brad Wiley Project Coordinator
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Fridayduring the fall and
winterterms bystudentsttheUniversity of Michigan.on copyis availablefreeocharge toall
readers. Additionalcopiesmaybe pickedup at the Dailyslofficefor$2.Subscriptions forfal term,
sta'ting in SeptemberviaU.S. malare $110.Winter term(January through Aprillis$11syearong
(September throughApril)is$195.Universityaoffiates are subject toareduceosubscripioranrte
On-ampssubscriptionsforfalltermare035. subscriptionsmustbe prepaid.TheMichigantoaily
isa e berote Ass ciated Press and The Asc iatedolleistePress.

0,

Student's choice
UMix
WHAT: Students voted and
UMix will show the win-
ing movie, provide students
with Hip-Hop and Salsa les-
sons and a free pasta bar.
WHO: University Unions
Arts & Programs
WHEN: 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union

An artcen yesteraay s
edition of The Daily titled
"'U officials, students
gatherto honor victims
of earthquake in Haiti"
incorrectly identified the
LSA junior who reached
out to MESA. Her name is
Ghida Dagher.
* Please report any errors
printed in the Daily to
corrections@michigan-
daily.com.

9

MORE ONLINE
Love Crime Notes? Get more online at michigandaily.com/blogs/the wire

No manslaughter defense in abortion doctor's murder

0

After hearing from
defendant, Judge
said premeditation
was obvious
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) - The
judge in the trial of a man accused
of murdering an abortion doctor
dealt the defense a major setback
Thursday, ruling that the jury can-
not consider a lesser charge of man-
slaughter.
The ruling came hours after
Scott Roeder took the stand in his

own defense and admitted killing
Dr. George Tiller, saying he acted
to save the lives of unborn children.
Roeder's attorneys had hoped to
win a lesser conviction of voluntary
manslaughter, which requires them
to show their client had an unrea-
sonable but honest belief that dead-
ly force was justified. The charge
carries a considerably lighter sen-
tence than murder.
Roeder testified that he consid-
ered elaborate schemes to stop the
doctor, including chopping off his
hands, crashing a car into him or
sneaking into his home to kill him.
But in the end, Roeder told

jurors, the easiest way was to walk
into Tiller's church, put aguntothe
man's forehead and pull the trigger.
. Testifying as the lone defense
witness, Roeder calmly explained
what he admitted publicly months
ago - that he killed Tiller to save
unborn children.
"Those children were in imme-
diate danger if someone did not
stop George Tiller," Roeder said
as the jury watched attentively but
without a hint of surprise.
"They were going to continue
to die," he said. "The babies were
going to continue to die."
Roeder has pleaded not guilty to

murder in the attack at the Wichita
church where Tiller was an usher.
Witnesses have described how
Roeder walked into the building's
foyer on May 31 shortly after the
service started, approached Tiller
and fired asingle shot before fleeing.
After Roeder's testimony, Dis-
trict Judge Warren Wilbert ruled
that the jury would not be permit-
ted to consider the manslaughter
charge because abortion, including
late-term abortion, is legal in Kan-
sas and because Tiller did not pose
an imminent threat.
"There is no immediate dan-
ger in the back of a church," the
judge said. He also ruled out a
second-degree murder conviction,
which does not involve premedita-
tion, because it was clear Roeder
planned the killing.
"It would be hard for a reason-
able fact-finder to find anything
other than the defendant formulat-
ing his belief and then planning on
multiple occasions ... to carry out
his intention to (kill) Dr. Tiller."
In a November interview with
The Associated Press, Roeder pub-
licly confessed to shooting Tiller,

who was one of the few doctors in
the country who performed late-
term abortions.
Roeder, 51, of Kansas City, Mo.,
said he considered other ways of
killing Tiller, including driving his
car into Tiller's or shooting him
with a shotgun. But he said he was
concerned those approaches could
hurt others.
"I did what I thought was needed
to be done to protect the children,"
Roeder said. "I shot him."
He testified that he wrapped the
.22-caliber handgun in a piece of
cloth and buried it in a rural area.
The weapon has not been recovered.
Prosecutors were careful during
the first few days of testimony to
avoid the subject of abortion and to
focus on the specifics of the shoot-
ing. The judge said he did not want
the trial to become a debate on
abortion, but he said he would give
Roeder a great deal of "latitude"
when discussinghis beliefs because
they were integral to his defense.
Throughout his questioning,
Roeder appeared calm and col-
lected, waiting quietly each time
prosecutors objected to something

he said about medical procedures
or late-term abortions, which the
judge forbade him from testifying
about.
When asked, for example, to
detail the types of abortion proce-
dures he was familiar with, Roeder
answered "four or five" and then
listed them. In one instance, he
described a procedure as the fetus
being "torn limb from limb" - a
characterization that prompted a
quick objection from prosecutor
Nola Foulston.
During a lengthy cross examina-
tion, Foulston tried to keep Roeder's
responses to "yes" or "no." At one
point, Roeder acknowledged that
he had been thinking about killing
abortion providers since the 1990s,
and had considered using a sword
to chop off Tiller's hands or killing
him at his home.
Roeder testified though that he
thought chopping off Tiller's hands
was not a good solution because
Tiller would still be able to train
people. He said Tiller's home was
not a good location because it was
in a gated community and difficult
to access.

.boardfor Student
Publications
seeks New Members
The University of Michigan Board for Student Publications
is recruiting two members for three-year terms beginning in April.
The Board is responsible for three publications:
The Michigan Daily, the Michiganensian Yearbook, and the Gargoyle.
Because the Board is committed to realizing diversity's benefits
for itself and for the publications it oversees, the Board
is particularly interested in recruiting members of the
University Community (faculty, staff and students) or the general public
who are members of underrepresented groups and who have
experience and expertise in journalism, law, finance, or development.
Interested persons are encouraged to apply.
For more information and application forms, please visit
our website: www.pub.umich.edu
or contact Mark Bealafeld, Student Publications General Manager
at (734) 936-7883 or mbealafe@umich.edu
The deadline for receipt of applications is
February 12, 2010.

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