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December 01, 2009 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-12-01

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2 - Tuesday, December 1, 2009

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

MONDAY: TUESDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers f the Beaten

WEDNESDAY:
Campus Clubs

THURSDAY:
Before You Were Here

FRIDAY:
Photos of the Week

A memorial that fights disease

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
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GARY GRACA DAN NEWMAN
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CONTACT INFORMATION
Newsroom office hours: Sun.-Thurs, 11a.m. - 2 a.m.
734-763-2459
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Corrections corrections@ichigandaiy.com
Letters to the Editor tothedaily@michigandaily.com

Many people honor the
death of a loved one by plac-
ing flowers on their grave or
making a small donation to a
cause the loved one was pas-
sionate about.
But Catherine MacDon-
ald Simpson took a different
route.
After her husband, Thom-
as Henry Simpson, died from
pernicious anemia - a blood
disorder caused by vitamin
B-12 deficiency - Simpson
funded the construction of
a half-million-dollar insti-
tute dedicated to fighting the
disease that led to her loved
one's death.
In 1923, Mrs. Simpson
donated more than $400,000
to the University to establish
the Thomas Henry Simp-
son Memorial Institute for
Medical Research, according
CRIME NOTES

to umhistory.dc.umich.edu.
The building was designed
and constructed by architect
Albert Kahn, who designed
numerous campus build-
ings, including Angell Hall,
according to the site.
The three-story institute
is located on South Observa-
tory Street, just across from
the Alice Lloyd Residence
Hall, and features a lobby,
offices, laboratories, a library
and a conference room. As
umhistory.dc.umich.edu
explains, the third floor was
originally used as a treat-
ment ward that could hold up
to 10 patients.
While the third floor ward
is now gone, the building itself
remains in similar condition,
featuring the same entrance
hall of walnut paneling. The
entrance hall now showcases

various glass-encased histori-
cal medical artifacts dating as
far back as the mid-18th cen-
tury. These artifacts include
various bloodlettingtools and
devices used in pernicious
anemia treatment.
While Mrs. Simpson's
initial focus for the institute
was to study pernicious ane-
mia, she hoped that the cen-
ter would eventually expand
to include the study of other
disorders. The first instance
of this occurred in 1962,
when it expanded to include
the study of other blood and
neoplastic diseases, accord-
ing to documentation from a
Nov. 1962 Board of Regents
meeting.
Though there is still no
cure for pernicious anemia,
the institute has made many
advancements in treat-

ment, including the devel- 7 7
opment of an important
therapeutic compound, pro-
gression toward the isola-
tion of vitamin B-12, and the
use of blood and blood sub-
stitutes in the treatment of
shock. The institute has also
made progress toward the
treatment of leukemia and
other blood-related diseases.
Today, the institute is
home to the Center for the
History of Medicine, part of
the Department of Internal
Medicine and the Historical
Center for the Health Servic-
es. The organization works
to study the "history, culture
and philosophy of medicine"
and "to place contemporary
medical dilemmas in context
with past events," according AARON AUGSBURGER/C
to its mission statement. The Simpson Memorial Institute on Observatory
- BETHANYBIRON Street.

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CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Men found in Couple caught in Lecture on Computer
hospital bed parking lot flying hospital showcase sale

WHERE: Mott's Children's
Hospital
WHEN: Sunday at about 6:25
a.m.
WHAT: Two subjects were
found sleeping ina room on
the first floor of the Hospital,
University Police reported.

WHERE: Lot M-16, 1513 Hos-
pital Drive
WHEN: Sunday at about 3:25
p.m.
WHAT: A male and female
were observed having sexual
relations in the parking lot,
University Police reported. The
incident is under investigation.

Ticket issued for
Amigscooter
unleashed dog
swiped

WHAT: Dr. Del Monte, WHAT: A holiday sale
an expert in pediatric on computers and acces-
ophthalmology and adult sories, with discounts for
strabismus, will give a students, faculty and staff.
talk on the International WHO: Michigan Administra-
Flying Eye Hospital. tive Information Services
WHO: Unite for Sight WHEN: Today from
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
WHERE: Great Lakes South WHERE: Michigan Union
Room, Palmer Commons and Pierpont Commons
CORRECTIONS
W 0orkshop on A story in yesterday's
edition of the Daily
negotiating 2"lt A
ne~m-Aiaing (After some delay, MSA
ajob offer opts for stop-gap to launch
website soon) incorrectly
stated that the backend
WHAT: Aworkshop to of MSA's website was
teach students how to writ te ite Pas
learn howto negotiate a job written in the PEARL
offer with a focus on the programming language.
employer's perspective. It was written in Perl
WHO: The Career Center programming language.
WHEN: Today from
noon ,o 2 p.m. * Please report any error
WHERE: Fourth floor, in the Daily to correc-
Assembly Hall tions@michigandaily.com.

A German tourist visiting
Disney World in Orlando,
Fla. made a bomb threat
yesterday, according to The
Associated. Press. Jochen
Naumann of Leipzig, Ger-
many told a worker stationed
at the security check point
that he had two bombs in his
backpack. The police report
says Naumann claimed he
was joking.
The University of Florida
has 16 LERD certified
buildings and is trying to
register five more.
">FOR MORE, SEE OPINION, PAGE 4
Two dogs in Beijing have
been diagnosed with the
H1N1 virus, the Beijing
Times reported. The virus
found in the dogs is 99 percent
identical to the H1N1 strain
found in humans.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Courtney Ratkowiak Managing Editor ratkowiak@michigandaily.com
acob SmiloVit ManagingNewstEditor smilovitz@icigandaily.com
SENsIONWSnEIORvS MattArn,Jillian Berm,reoro Ce,J,,
ASSISo E sooEDITORS: Nicole Aber, Mallory Jones, Emily Orley, Stephanie
Steinberg,EshwarThirunavukkarasu
Robert Soave Editorial Page Editor soave@michigandaity.com
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Emily Barton, Brian Flaherty RacheVan Gilder
ASSISTANTEDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Emma Jszke, Matthew Shuter
Andy Reid Managing Sports Editor reid@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SOR TEDITORS: Nicole Auerbach, Mike Eisenstein, Ian Kay, Ruth
Linoln, A,ex oeri
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Mark Burns, Chantel Jennings, Gjon Juncaj, Ryan
Kartje, Chris Meszaros, Ryan Podges
David WatniCk ManagingArtsEditor watnick@michandaiy.com
SENIORARTSEDITORS: JaieBlock,Brandon Conradis,WhitneyPow
ASSISTANTARTSEDITORS:JoshuaBayer,CarolynKlarecki,AndrewLapin,DavidRiva,
JeffSanford.
Zachary Meisner and photo@michigandaily.com
Clif Reeder ManagingPhoto Editors
SEN1RPHOTOEDITORS:saidAlsaIah,ChaneIVon Habsbug-Lothringen
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:MaxCollins,ChrisDzombak,SamWolson
AngelaChih and design@michigandaily.com
MaureenStych ManagingDesignEditors
SENIOR DESIGN EDITOR: Allison Ghaman
JessicarVosgerchial Magazine Editor vosgerchian@michigandaily.com
Katherine Mitchell Copy Chief mnitchell@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE COPY CHIEF:Melanie Fried, Adi Wollstein
BUSINESS STAFF
Katielaizwiak Sites Managee
SA LES FORCEMANAGER:Molly Twigg
MARKETING MANAGER: Michael Schrotenboer
RyanaBusinski CassifiedManager
Des Erglish Perotioseaniger
Allison Santacreu Layout Manager
Vivian LeeFinance Manager
Brittany Morales circulation Manager
Brad Wiley Project Coordinator
The Michigan Daily liStN074s-967)is published Mondaythrough Friday during thefall and
witer terms by studentsat the UniversityoftMichigan. One copyis availablefree of charge
to l readers. Additionalcopiesmay be pickedupattheDailysofficefor$2. Subscriptions
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Associated Colegiate Press.

01

WHERE: Mitchell Field
WHEN: Sunday at about 12:10
p.m.
WHAT: A subject was issued
a ticket for walkingtheir dog
without a leash, University
Police reported.

WHERE:University Hospital
WHEN:Monday atabout 4:05 a.m.
WHAT: An Amigo scooter
was checked out of the hospi-
tal and not returned, Univer-
sity Police reported.

MORE ONLINE
Love Crime Notes? Get more onlieut mirhigandily.tom/blogs/thwire "

Trial begins for Ohio man
accused of crimes in Nazi camp

0

John Demjanjuk, 89,
charged with killing
27,900 as camp guard
MUNICH (AP) - John Demjan-
juk sat in a wheelchair wrapped
in a light blue blanket, his eyes
closed and his face pale as his trial
opened yesterday on charges he
helped kill 27,900 Jews as a Nazi
death camp guard.
Lawyers for the retired Ohio auto-
worker portrayed him as a victim -
of the Nazis and misguided German
justice. But three German doctors
testified the Ukrainian-born Dem-
janjuk was fit to stand trial.
Wearing a blue baseball cap, Dem-
janjuk, 89, was wheeled in to the
packed Munich state court and did
not answer when presiding judge
Ralph Alt asked if he could answer
basic questions about himself. His
left hand twitched occasionally
and his mouth was open slightly as
though he was in pain.
A German doctor who exam-

ined Demjanjuk two hours before
the trial began said that despite
suffering from a bone marrow
disease and other ailments he was
able to face trial.
"He lies there, keeps his eyes
closed, but understands everything,"
said Dr. Albrecht Stein.
Demjanjuk's family disputed that.
"Given his now confirmed grave
medical condition and his resulting
inability to fully defend himself,
it is farcical for anyone to say he
is fit for trial and malpractice for
any doctor to recommend it," said
his son, John Demjanjuk Jr., in an
e-mail sent from Ohio.
Demjanjuk was deported in May
from the United States and has been
in custody in Munich since then. He
could face up to 15 years in prison if
convicted of training as a guard in
the Trawniki SS camp, then serving
in the Sobibor death camp in Nazi-
occupied Poland.
The prosecution argues that after
Demjanjuk, a Soviet Red Army sol-
dier, was capturedby the Germans
in1942hevolunteeredtoserveunder

the SS as a guard.
Demjanjuk has denied that, say-
ing he spent most of the rest of the
war in Nazi POW camps before
joining the so-called Vlasov army
made up of Soviet POWs and other
anti-communists to fight with the
Germans against the encroach-
ing Soviets in the final months of
World War II.
Ulrich Busch, one of Demjanjuk's
twolawyers,toldthecourtthatthose
Ukrainians who did volunteer to
serve as guards did soto save them-
selves, noting that millions of Soviet
POWs died at the hands of the Nazis.
"Germany did not only com-
mit the Holocaust on the Jews, but
also on the Red Army prisoners of
war," he said. Those who trained at
"Trawniki were survivors, not per-
petrators."
Efraim Zuroff, the top Nazi hunt-
er at the Simon Wiesenthal Center,
said the contention was offensive.
"It is a total distortion of the
Holocaust and turns people with
criminal responsibility into blame-
less victims," he said.

0

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