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March 13, 2009 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2009-03-13

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LIE £id igan Bait

Ann Arbor, Michigan Friday, March 13, 2009
In Big Ten opener, 'M'routs Iowa
Led by strong, inside presence
of forward DeShawn Sims,
Blue all but seals NCAA bid
By JASON KOHLER
Daily Sports Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - Standing by a locker in Conseco
Fieldhouse, redshirt freshman Laval Lucas-Perry
radiated the confidence of Michigan fans throughout
the country:
"I think we've already made it to the NCAA Tour-
nament," Lucas-Perry said.
Junior forward DeShawn Sims scored Michigan's
first 14 points on 7-of-7 shooting to lead the seventh-
seeded Wolverines to a 73-45 win over No. 10 seed
Iowa in the first round of the Big Ten Tournament
yesterday afternoon.
The victory all but cements Michigan's spot in the
NCAA Tournament, its first tournament bid in 10
years. The Wolverines will
learn if they made the tour- IOWA 45
nament, their tournament MICHIGAN 73
seed and where they'll be
headed for NCAA first-round play on Sunday. -
Although the Wolverines tried not to think about
the Big Dance, they knew they could ill afford to drop
a game to a team with a sub-.500 record.
"We didn't want to put too much stress on it and
stress it too much to where we felt like we had pres-
sure on us," sophomore forward Manny Harris said.
"But it was definitely a goal. We thought about it."
Sims used the pressure as motivation early. Hes
exploded for 27 points - 18 of them in the first half - ------
and hit 12 of16 shots.
"You can tell from the start, even from the hotel
room, you know when you're ready to go," Harris said.
"He talks about it. He says something about it. His
whole body language is different.",
And Michigan (9-9 Big Ten, 20-12 overall) didn't
shy away from feeding the hot hand.
"You feel like when you give it to him, he's going
to score," Harris said. "You sometimes don't even go
rebound, which we got to do. But that's how our team
builds off him scoring and him getting into it." ;
No other Wolverine scored until redshirt freshman
guard Laval Lucas-Perry drained a 3-pointer eight SAM WOLSON/Daly
minutes into the first half. Manny Harris soars past owa defenders during Michigan's 73-45 victory over Iowa in the first round of
See FIRST ROUND, Page 3 the 2009 Big Ten Tournament yesterday in Indianapolis. Michigan will play Illinois in the next round.

michigandaily.com
UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS
Stockwell:.
Not. for
freshmen

University Housing
policy change part
of effort to retain.
upperclassmen
By VERONICA MENALDI
Daily StaffReporter
Many upperclassmen on cam-
pus might shy away from resi-
dence hall life after their first
years of sharing rooms and halls
mostly filled with freshmen. But
University Housing is trying to
change that.
Stockwell Residence Hall, a
former all-female dorm current-
ly undergoing renovations, will
reopen in Fall 2009 as a coedu-
cational residence hall geared
toward sophomores and upper
classmen.
University Housingspokesman
Peter Logan said the residence
hall will not house any freshmen
and will feature programming to
enhance the second-year experi-
ence.
"It will be unique among any of
the residence halls," he said..
Logan said the prevalence of
single rooms in Stockwell was one
of the main reasons Housing offi-
cials chose to gear the residence

hall toward sophomores.
"Since returning students
tend to prefer single rooms, we
made a decision to create more
of a second-year and older com-
munity for Stockwell," Logan
said.
Ashley Londy, president of
the Residence Halls Association,
said Stockwell has a majority of
single rooms available in a rela-
tively central location, making it
a desirable option for returning
students.
"Stockwell has a lot of single
rooms, and it's interesting to see
more single rooms available to
both men and women," Londy
said. "That way they areboth able
to enjoy having that option that's
a limited commodity."
Londy said she hopes the
uniquely sophomore experience
offered in Stockwell will at least
draw more students into consid-
ering continued living in the resi-
dence halls after their freshman
year.
"I hope it attracts more people
to stay in the residence halls,"
she said. "I really hope people
recognize that the University is
responding to the needs of the
.students to make sure the stu-
dents have whatthey want, which
is amazing."
See STOCKWELL, Page 3

CAMPUS LIFE AND THE ECONOMY
Student groups struggle to
raise money in tough times.

AMERC A'S OTHER WAR
Panel: Local governance key in Afghan.

Michigan Student
Assembly officials
report increase in
funding requests
By AMY MUNSLOW
Daily StaffReporter
Few organizations have found
sufficient cover from the fallout of
the nation's economic downturn
and student groups on campus are

no different.
With students forced to bud-
get more carefully, some campus
organizations are facing decreased
recruitment and alack of funds.
LisaAverill, the treasurer for the
Michigan Student Assembly, said
rising numbers of funding requests
from various student organizations
are overwhelming MSA's Budget
Priorities Coinmittee and Com-
munity Service Commission, the
two MSA committees that allocate
funds for organizations on campus.
"Right now, we absolutely have

had to explore where we could pull
money from to fund the massive
influx of legitimate, well-filled out
BPC/CSC applications," she wrote
in an e-mail.
Averill, an LSA junior, added that
the primary reason for this flood of
funding applications is decreased
participation in campus groups,
especially those with membership
fees.
"With lower recruitment, these
organizations have to reach out
even more to fund their events,
See STUDENT GROUPS, Page 3

Anthropologists say
Taliban could serve
purpose in fixing
country's problems
By MALLORY JONES
Daily StaffReporter
Three anthropologists said
yesterday that the solution to the
increasing violence in Afghani-
stan might just be to put the Tali-
ban back in power.

In a panel discussion hosted by
the Center for Russian and East
European Studies yesterday, the
experts discussed their solutions
to the conflict in Afghanistan.
David Edwards, professor of
social sciences in the anthropol-
ogy and sociology at Williams
College, Nazif Shahrani, profes-
sor of anthropology at Indiana
University and Alessandro Mon-
sutti, a social anthropologist and
postdoctoral fellow at Yale Uni-
versity, spoke to a room of about
60 people. The event was also
broadcast to two other locations

on campus.
Douglas Northrop, director of
the Center for Russian and East
European Studies, said the depart-
ment decided to host the event
after students expressed interest
in the complex country.
"(These speakers) spent years
livingthere, learningits languages,
and understanding its cultures,"
Northrop wrote in an e-mail.
"Given that the USA is now send-
ing tens of thousands of troops into
Afghanistan, surely it is critical for
all of us to learn more about the
See PANEL, Page 3

THIS GUY'S GOT TALENT - AND A BIRD.

INVESTING OVERSEAS
TAMID connects business
students with Israeli economy

Organization
educates members
on economic matters,
sends them to Israel
By MALLORY BEBERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Sometimes a person's best ideas
are generated around 3 a.m., while
hanging out with friends in your
freshman residence hall.
At least this was the case for
Sasha Gribov and Eitan Ingall,

the co-founders of TAMID Israel
Investment Group, a student-led
nonprofit organization aiming to
bridge the gap between American
business students and the Israeli
economy.
"We've started something that
we think could revolutionize the
connection between our genera-
tion of business students and the
state of Israel," said Gribov, a Busi-
ness junior. Ingall is an LSA junior
concentrating in organizational
studies.
Gribov added that the group's
members were motivated to create
this opportunity for students, out of

their lovefor Israel.
"Israel is a huge part of our iden-
tity and who we are as young peo-
ple, as Americans and as Jews and
we wanted to create somethingthat
would facilitate that connection for
other members of our generation,"
he said.
At thebeginning of this semester,
20 freshmen and sophomores with
a shared interest in business and
Israel joined forces with TAMID's
15-member executive board to cre-
ate the group's first membership
class.
Business junior Garrett Leven-
See TAMID, Page 3

Freshman magician Alan Smola, who has been doing shows since the age of 10, performs at the Michigan's GotTalent show last
night in the East Quadrangle Residential College Auditorium. For more photos of the event, check out michigandaily.com.

WEATHER H :49
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INDEX NEWS ........ . . 2 ART'S.....................S.............5
Vo.cXiX,No.108 SUDOKU...............................3 CLASSIFIEDS............6
m2009TheMichiganlaily OPINION...........................4 SPORTS .......................7

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