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November 25, 2008 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-11-25

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2 - Tuesday, November 25, 2008

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com ,

2 - Tuesday, November 25, 2008 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom g

Im

Late night show at the Fishbowl

RF Tq. T TTF

As I was working on one of the Bot, even if it was
four papers standing between me fly, well done, si
and all the turkey my tummy can making my nighta!
handle, I was interrupted by loud and a bit more nake
banging on the big windows of the Hint: I wouldn't
Fishbowl. It was 12:40 a.m., I was against the Fish
tired, my eyes hurt and all the Macs tomorrow.
were taken, so I had to settle for a LAURI
PC. Basically, I wanted to die.
I looked over only to discover
that the source of the unfortunate An unusual
noise: nine gentleman who kept
banging for a few more seconds to stargazing
make sure everyone was paying
attention. Last Friday I wa
Then, like in the split second Astronomy Depar
before you know that Michigan House in AngellH
receiver is going to drop the pass, I um. It was almost e
realize they aren't trying to get my two dudes, butI sat
attention to tell me to donate blood to befriend them b
or pass out a flyer, not this time. began.
Before you can say, "Go Blue!" I started by as
I've got ass in my face. Mooned. It majors.Immediatel
was clearly planned and synchro- major accused the I
nized down to the designated scat- being a communit
ter direction each mooner headed. posing as a Univers

planned on the
irs. Thanks for
little less crappy
d.
press your face
bowl windows
ENBERNSTEIN
1night of
s lured in to the
rtment's Open
Hall's planetari-
mpty except for
down and tried
efore the show
sking for their
y, the chemistry
English major of
y college alum
ity student.

As they bickered about each
other's identities, the guy running
the projector tried to lay down the
planetarium rules.
"No drugs?" interrupted Chemis-
try man during the 'no drugs' rule.
"Too late!"
I thought he was joking about
his inebriation - until two minutes
later, when I began to realize that
the show would be polluted by his
jackass commentary on everything
from his astrology sign to the shape
of the lecturer's laser pointer.
The banter stopped for two short
minutes, only to return in full force
during Q&A time.,
"Stupid question," chemistry
dude declared, interrupting English
man's query about the infrared belt.
"Dude, you're making me feel
like my questions are illegitimate,"
English man whined.
"I'm just saying," reasoned the
stoner, "your question was stupid."
SARA LYNNE THELEN

Members of the student group South Asian Awareness
Network watch a short film in the Henderson Room of the
Michigan League yesterday. The film showing was part of
preparations for a conference scheduled for January about
issues affecting the South Asian community.

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4
i

4

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Lingerie lifted Wallet stolen Talk on classical
from laundry from the CCRB Chinese theater

WHERE: West Quad
WHEN: Sunday at 3:40 p.m.
WHAT: Seven bras, a tank
top and blue jeans were stolen
after being left in the dryer
overnight on Saturday night,
University Police reported. The
items were valued at $100 and
police have no suspects.

WHERE: Central Campus Rec-
reation Building
WHEN: Sunday at 10:50 p.m.
WHAT: An unattended wallet
and cell phone, valued at $50,
were taken from a University
student on Saturday between
9:40 and 11 p.m., University
Police reported. The wallet con-
tamed $23 in cash.

WHAT: Chinese performer
Wen Yuhang will discuss
and perform monologues and
arias in the style of kunqu,
a classical genre of Chinese
theatre.
WHO: Center for Chinese
Studies
WHEN: Today at noon
WHERE: School of Social
Work Building, Room 1636

Student found Drunk student
passed out in assaults officer Figure drawing
residence hall . workshop

Prayer meeting
WHAT: The first in a series
of weekly group prayer
meetings
WHO: University Christian
Outreach
WHEN: Tonight from 8 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m.
WHERE: Campus Chapel
Chamber choir
performance
WHAT: A performance con-
ducted by Jerry Blackstone
featuringworks by Johannes
Brahms and Vaughan Wil-
liams
WHO: School of Music, The-
atre & Dance
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Walgreen Drama
Center, Stamps Auditorium
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any error
in the Daily to correc-
tions@michigandaily.com.

In honor of Thanksgiving,
the Our Country Deserves
Better Political Action
Committee is airing ads that
pay tribute to Alaska governor
Sarah Palin. The ads highlight
Palin's preference for moose
chili as a turkey alternative.
Yesterday, the University
awarded suspected com-
munist Milo Radulovich
an honorary degree 58 years
after the Red Scare forced him
to drop out of the University.
>>FOR MORE, SEE OPINION, PAGE 4
3The World Anti-Doping
Agency is considering
banning the use of Viagra
for athletes, according to the
New York Times. The group is
financing a study at Marywood
University in Scranton, Penn.,
to see if the little blue pill
unfairly increases an athlete's
oxygen-carrying capacity.

4

WHERE: Markley Residence
Hall
WHEN: Saturday at 7:45 am.
WHAT: A studentwas found
passed out in the laundry room,
wearing only a sweatshirt and
underpants, University Police
reported. The subject had
passed out in the hall and was
moved to the laundry room.

WHERE: Shapiro Undergradu-
ate Library
WHEN: Sunday at about 12:15'
a.m.
WHAT: A highly intoxicated
subject assaulted a University
police officer, University Police
reported. The subject was,
turned over to HVA for trans-
port to UMER due to level of
intoxication. The officer was
not injured in the incident.

WHAT: A figure drawing
session with live models, open
to artists of all levels. Instruc-
tion apd limited supplies will
be offered in a casual studio
setting.
WHO: Arts on the Hill
WHEN: Tonight from 7 p.m.
to 9 pm.
WHERE: Alice C. Lloyd Hall,
Ground Floor Art Studio

Seven killed in Green Zone blast

.4

Suicide bomber
strikes entrance to
U.S. protected area
BAGHDAD (AP) - A woman
hiding a bomb under her long
robe blew herself up among Iraqis
waiting to enter the U.S.-protect-
ed Green Zone, where lawmakers
plan to vote this week on a pact
that would let American forces
stay in Iraq for up to three more
years.
The morning attack in central
Baghdad killed seven people, by
an Iraqi count, and came about 45
minutes after a bomb destroyed a
minibus carrying Trade Ministry
employees in the-eastern part of
the capital. At least 13 people died
in that blast, most of them women;
some of the bodies were burned
so badly that authorities could not
immediately identify them.
Ahmed al-Sayyid, 23, said he
was waiting in line with friends
at an entrance to the Green Zone,
hoping for a job interview with
the Iraqi police. A woman in a
black abaya, an enveloping cloak,
approached the line without
drawing the attention of guards,
he said.
"Suddenly, she blew herself up
about 50 meters from where I was

standing. I was horrified and Iran
away. But seconds later, I returned
to- the explosion site, which was
filled with smoke, and I could see
some wounded people and pieces
of flesh," al-Sayyid said.
Guards fired in the air to dis-
perse the crowd after the explo-
sion, he said.
U.S. troops have been instru-
mental in weakening insurgents,
and the latest attacks appeared
to bolster the Iraqi government's
claim that a hasty American
departure could undermine the
relative stability that many parts
of Iraq have enjoyed since 2007.
That argument is key to efforts by
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to
win parliament's broad approval
for the U.S.-Iraqi pact.
Therulingcoalitionhasamajor-
ity in parliament and could secure
at least a thin majority if the 275-
seat legislature votes as sched-
uled Wednesday on the security
deal. Al-Maliki's campaign, how-
ever, has run into resistance from
lawmakers who either want the
Americans to leave immediately
or seek to extract political conces-
sions in return for supporting the
government.
Wednesday's session in parlia-
ment will be the last before the
legislature goes into recess for
the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha,

when scores of lawmakers travel
to Saudi Arabia for the annual
Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, said
Khalid al-Attiyah, deputy speaker
of the parliament.
Lawmakers will meet again in
the second half of December, he
said.
American troops currently
operate under the legal cover of
a U.N. mandate that expires Dec.
31. If the Iraqi parliament rejects
the agreement and the U.N. man-
date is notrenewed, U.S. and other
foreign forces in Iraq would have
to be confined inside their bases
from the beginning of 2009.
There was no evidence that the
attacks on Monday were linked to
the contentious debate over the
security pact, which sets a time-
line for the withdrawal of U.S.
troops - from cities, by next June
30 and the entire country by Jan.
1, 2012 - and places them under
strict Iraqi supervision.
But the bombings amounted to
a show of defiance and a reminder
of the possibility that attacks could
increase as American troop levels
fall and the Iraqis assume iore
responsibility.
President-elect Barack Obama 1
has said he wants to withdraw
combat troops from Iraq within 16
months of taking office in January,
anevenspeediertimetablethanthe
one outlined in the security pact.
Under the deal, Iraq would have
full responsibility for the Green
Zone but is entitled to request
"limited and temporary support"
from:the U.S. military in main-
taining security. The heavily pro-
tected area on the west bank of
the Tigris river houses the U.S.,
Embassy and the Iraqi government
headquarters.
In a news conference last week,
al-Maliki said he might relax
restrictions on entry into the Green
Zone"sothewholeofBaghdadcan,
God willing, be green too."
Yesterday's suicide bombing at
a checkpoint just outside the zone
suggested the prime ministers
declaration will remain wishful
thinking for a while. Seven people
died and 13 were wounded in the
attack, according to an Interior 1
Ministry official who declined to
give his name.
The U.S.military said the bomb-
ingkilledtwoIraqi armymembers
and three civilians. One civilian
was injured, it said.

From Grassroots Films of Brooklyn, New York
THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE
Tuesday, December 2nd at 7 p.m. at the Michigan Theater.
The real story of a band of brothers who travel the world in search of the
answers to the burning questions: Who am 1? Who is Man? Why do we
searchfor meaning? Their journey brings them into the middle of the
lives of the homeless on the streets of New York City, the orphans and
disabled children of Peru, and the abandoned lepers in the forests of
Ghana, Africa. What the young men discover changes them forever.
Through one-on-one interviews and real life encounters, the brothers are
awakened to the beauty of the human person and the resilience of the
human spirit.
Winner "Best Humanitarian Film 2008" at the Sedona Film Festival and
"Best Documentary Feature 2008" at the Maui Film Festival.
Tickets are $9 for adults, $7 for students/seniors/US Veterans, and $6.50 for
Michigan Theater Members. Tickets can be purchased in advance through
www.ticketweb.com and at the Michigan Theater the day of the screening,
and from Transfiguration Parish at 734-482-6240
View the trailer at www.grassrootsfilms.com

C RE AT IVE P R 0CES i
AN INT ER DISCIPLINARY STUDIO-LECTUR E COURSE
WINTER 2009 - UART$ - Class #29325
4 credits, No prerequisites
Satr s LSA requirements for Creative Expression
Friday -3, School of Art & Design, North Campus
Ma g creativity an integral part of
students' lives and work.=
.Www.artsonearth.org/students
3 EARTH
Thi u;:; e is supprt d by the Universty f ichsigaris
!vi disaa{: rrLa mni gart Te n s " id igv

V

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