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November 14, 2008 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-11-14

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2A- Friday, November 14, 2008

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Proposal lis not a green light

On November 4, Proposal 1
to legalize medicinal marijuana
passed in Michigan by a landslide,
capturing 63 percent of the vote.
But don't expect to see any "pot
shops" on State Street - it's not
California.
The new proposal is not a green
light to grow pot, even if you're
feeling faint or feverish.
Under Michigan's proposal, a
person must have a debilitating ill-
ness including cancer, glaucoma,
Crohn's Disease, Hepatitis C, or
AIDS in order to qualify for medi-
cal marijuana. Of the ten million
people living in Michigan, only
about 50,000 are eligible to use
marijuana.
But simply having one of these
diseases isn't enough to be able to
grow marijuana legally, said Chris
Chiles, executive director of Stu-
dents for Sensible Drug Policy.

"You'd need to have a written
doctor's recommendation and then
you'd need to apply for an ID card
with the Department of Commu-
nity Health," he said.
Chiles said if the patients are
unwilling or unable to grow the
marijuana for themselves, they
could designate a caregiver to grow
it for them.
"If a person is not qualified under
this initiative to be a patient and they
choose to be a caregiver, they have
to have a designated patient and the
ID card of that patient to grow the
marijuana for them," he said.
However, not just anyone can be
a caregiver.
The caregiver is chosen by the
patient and must be at least 21 years
old with no prior felony convictions
involving drugs. Once the patient
chooses a caregiver, the caregiver
has to follow the same rules for

growingtheplants as patientsunder
the legislation, including registering
with the Department of Community
Health.
"They can cultivate 12 plants in a
locked facility and possess up to 2.5
ounces of usable marijuana," Chiles
said. "The caregivers can only have
up to five patients."
Public Health Prof. Donald Ver-
een told The Michigan Daily earlier
this month that he's worried about
how the initiative will be imple-
mented because it doesn't specify
how patients would get marijuana
in the first place.
"I would be much more sup-
portive of the bill if it at least
acknowledged the risk that because
marijuana - because it should be
available to these folks who are suf-
fering legitimately - it puts young
people more at risk." he said.
ELAINE LAFAY

Medicinal marijuana was legalized in Michigan earlier this
month with the passage of Proposal 1. But in order to grow
plants or use the drug residents must qualify be having one of
the specified illnesses or be an appointed caregiver.

4ie idiigan BIy
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The Michiganaly(ISSNO745-967> is published Monday through yury ingtheftalland winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan.One copy is available free of charge to all rea< ers.
Additiona copies may be picked up atthe Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for fal term starting in
September,viaU.S.mailare$110.Winter term(January through Apri is$115,yearlong (september
through Apr)is $195. university af filiates are subect to a reedesubscription rate.On-campus
subsiiat in a esair t3. cripiois'tat beprepaid. The Michigea6Dil ls menberof
The Associaedres andThe AssciatedCollegiateress

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Car drives over Money stolen
pedestrian's foot from clinic

WHERE: Fuller Road
WHEN: Wednesday at about
8 p.m.
WHAT: A man rolled over a
pedestrian's foot with his car,
University Police reported. The
victim refused medical treat-
ment. An accident report was
filed.

WHERE: Ypsilanti Family
Practice, 200 Arnet St.
WHEN: Wednesday at about
3:30 p.m.
WHAT: $32 was stolen from
the family clinic, University
Police reported. Police have no
suspects.

Parked car hit,
$710 chair stolen mirror, fender
from building damaged

Business lunch
on etiquette
WHAT: A walkthrough of
how to conduct yourself dur-
ing a business meal. The cost
of the workshop including
the meal is $5.
WHO: University Unions
Arts & Programs.
WHEN: Today from noon to
1:30 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League,
Room D
Battle of the
local bands
WHAT: A competition
featuring more than half a
dozen local bands, with the
proceeds going to charity.
Tickets are $5.
WHO: Persian Students
Association
WHEN: Tonight at 7:45 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League,

WHAT: The Rude Mechani-
cals will perform William
Shakespeare's "Measure for
Measure." Tickets are $3 for
students and $5 for adults.
WHO: The Rude Mechani-
cals
WHEN: Tonight at 8 p.m.
WHERE: Mendelssohn
Theatre
CORRECTIONS
" A headline on the front
page of yesterday's Daily
(Early votingproposed
in state Senate) failed to
specify that the proposed
legislation includes absentee
voting and early voting at
city offices, but not early
voting at standard precincts.
Please report any error
in the Daily to correc-
tions@michigandaily.com.

he entered the tigers' cage.
The men's soccer team
advanced in the Big Ten
tournament yesterday,
beating Wisconsin in penalty
kicks. The team will play Indi-
ana in the semi-finals today.
FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE 5A
After investing more
than $10,000 and four
years into the project,
a Florida man now owns the
Guinness World Record for the
world's largest rubber band
ball, The Associated Press
reported. The ball weighs,
more than 9,032 pounds.

Shakespeare's A zookeeper in Singapore
was mauled to death by
"M easure for Ithree white Bengal tigers,
the BBC reported. Police
M easure" believe the manmay have been
trying to commit suicide when

WHERE: North Ingalls Build-
ing
WHEN: Wednesday at about
5:30 p.m.
WHAT: A chair was stolen for
the waiing room of the build-
ing, University Police reported.
The chair was valued at $710.
Police have no suspects.

WHERE: Parking Lot SC-4,
1100 Greene Street
WHEN: Wednesday at about
2:45 p.m.
WHAT: Someone struck a car
parked in the lot from Tuesday
to Wednesday, damaging the
side mirror and front fender,
University Police reported. The
damages amounted to $300.

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