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October 09, 2008 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Thursday, October 9, 2008 - 38

The Michigan Daily - nichigandailycom Thursday, October 9, 2008 - 38

Down
to new
lows
The Dow Jones Industrial
Average isn't the only thing
that plummeted last week.
Since his three gal pals Holly,
Bridget and Kendra jumped ship
earlier this month, Hugh Hefner's
82-year-old
penis is lower
than in his
pre-Cialis
days. The girls,
best known
for starring on
the E! reality
series "Girls MARK
Next Door," U TZ
are reportedly
standing guard at J. Howard Mar-
shall's grave, waiting for him to rise
from the dead and put them in his
will. According to The Daily Tele-
graph, the three bust-keteers might
be leaving because of the financial
troubles faced by Playboy; Hefner
had to lay off many staff members
two weeks ago. Of course, his per-
sonal robe washer and pipe unclog-
ger are still gainfully employed.
You know who else doesn't have
a job? Britney Spears's old flame
Adnan Ghalib. That maybe why
he's desperately hawking a sex tape
of him and Spears to the highest
bidder. The tape, which is appar-
ently an excruciating two hours
long, features Spears in a pink wig
and, most likely, whacked out on a
combination of Xanax, vodka-red
bull and those silica gel packets that
come with new clothes.
Fortunately for Spears, her law-
yers are working overtime to make
sure the tape never sees the light of
day and Ghalib has recently said,
probably with a.45 to his head:
"There is no sex tape." Right, and
Bill Clinton never had sexual rela-
tions with that woman. The bottom
line is that Spears's sex tape will
probably remain in Ghalib's VCR
- at least until Spears runs out of
money to pay her lawyers. But think
about it: If you piece together the
flurry of images from the last five
years featuring Spears writhing
half-naked on film and exposing
every (and I mean every) part of her
body, you'll probably get a decent
idea of what her having sex would
look like.
On a completely different level
ofcelebrityvoyeurism-for-bucks,
a letter from a young Princess
Diana - in my opinion, the over-
rated Kurt Cobain of royalty - in
which she pleads with her sister
to marry Prince Charles, was
recently sold at auction for 12,432
pounds, or $43 million. (Actually,
it's about $22,000) Prince Charles
must be breathing a sigh of relief
right now. Whew, Chuck, thank
God you held out for a princess
who first eclipsed you in social
and celebrity status and then
These are the
people we love?

divorced you, and followed it up
with Camilla Parker Bowles, a.k.a.
the Dog-Faced Woman. Ouch.
That was harsh, maybe too harsh.
But, hey, you don't read this kind
of stuff without expecting your
sense of gentility to be offended,
do ya, Cammy?
Camilla may be ugly, but at
least she isn't a bad parent. I wish
I could say the same for Sharon
Stone, who recently lost custody
of her eight year-old son, allegedly
because she wanted to Botox his
feet. Honestly, I think it's just too
damn predictable at this point
to make a joke about where the
So-year-old actress should really
be applying Botox.
Speaking of bad parents,
Spears's dad Jamie - who prob-
ably needs detox, not Botox - has
barred his daughter from seeing
some of her friends and family
members, including her close
cousin Alli Sims, according to
TMZ. Look, Jamie: I think Brit-
ney needs to be spending more
time with supportive family mem-
* bers and less time ... well, see the
second paragraph.
It seems like every celebrity
who isn't making a sex tape is
speaking about the upcoming
election. "The Hills" pseudo-ce-
* lebrity couple Heidi Montag and
Spencer Pratt, a.k.a Speidi, have
recently endorsed Republican
vice presidential candidate Sarah
Palin. Pratt, using as many sen-
tence fragments as Palin herself,
told Hollyscoop: "Well, I got a six
See GOSSIP, Page 4B

Virgil Moorefield presents "Five Ideas About the Relation of Sight and Sound" this weekend at the Duderstadt Center.

f you've ever looked at an advertisement and
thought, "That blue really doesn't go with the
letter T," you may be a synesthete. The taste
of a word, the color of a number or the sound of a
shape are mere poetic devices for
most people. But for others, these
experiences are real. Neurologists Five Ideas
believe all people are synesthetes About the
until about age four, but as our Relation of
brains develop, these connections
disappear. But not everyone loses Sight and
the ability to access synethesia. Sound
For as many as one in 23 people,
the brain fails to disconnect these Friday and
cross-sensory activations, allow- Saturday,
ing the associations to continue 8p.m.
- colors with letters; shapes with At the
sounds; textures with smells. Duderstadt Center
Even though most cases are Free
genetic, synesthesia has also been
reported from individuals who
have experienced epileptic seizures, blindness and
deafness, and also those who have used psychedelic
drugs.
You don't, however, need to take illicit substances
or gouge out your eyes to experience synethesia -
you just need to go to North Campus. Tonight and
tomorrow at 8 p.m. in the Duderstadt Video Studio,
Virgil Moorefield, an Associate Professor in the
School of Music, will premiere his latest intermedia

piece, "Five Ideas About the Relation of Sight and
Sound." The word "synesthesia," derived from the
Ancient Greek words meaning "with" and "sensa-
tion," is the crossing of the senses, in this case those
of sight and sound. The performance simulates
the experience by simultaneously compiling live,
acoustic music and real-time visual imagery with
7.2 surround sound and nine screens, including a
custom-built 60-feet-by-10 feet "wave screen." The
anticipated result of this combined media is an all-
consuming sensory immersion.
"We don't work with (a pre-arranged) video
clip," Moorefield said. "We're actually generating
a matrix, a video matrix, from the sound. So we're
going directly into the computer, hitting the com-
puter with audio and saying, 'Translate accordingto
these rules,' and it creates a video from that."
This aspect of real-time performance adds to
Moorefield's concept of what he calls "comprovisa-
tion," the art of composed improvisation. Certain
elements are improvised in the performance space
while the large-scale themes and musical scores are
structured. Moorefield integrates "comprovisation"
into his pieces regularly, and "Five Ideas About the
Relation of Sight and Sound" is no exception. The
visuals aren't arranged beforehand, but occur as
the notes are played - thus giving the element of.
improvisation - but the computer program behind
the improvisations has been perfected over many
See SIGHT, Page 4B

MADMN AND
SPECILIT
A satirical tragedy hy the Mabel Prize-winning Arican playwright

by Wale Soyinka
Directed by
Mbala Nkanga
Dept. oft
theatre & Drama
Oct. 9 & 16 at 7:30PM
Oct. 10, 11,17, & 18 at DPM
Oct. 12 a 19 at 2PM
Arthur Miler Theatre
tickets $24/$9 student wIlD
league Ticket Office
734-764-2538

jI

Graduate School
Information Fair 2008
Tuesday, October 14th
The Michigan Union, 4pm-7pm
Meer with over 100 graduate schools
from across the country
Explore options, collect application
information and ask about financial aid
Visit The Career Center's website for a
list of schools scheduled to attend
S6eaute...one day can make all the difference!

Forutmoreinortonctatua:

TheCareerCenter
tDlsieeof StudentAffair

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