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April 01, 2008 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-04-01

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Where the Wii has failed Keeping quiet about the Olympics
A plea for Nintendo to stop making hardware Arts, Page s Why a boycott's a bad idea Opinion, Page 4
ONE HtNDRED-EIGHTEEN'YEARSOF EDIT01RIAL1FREEDOM

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

michigandaily.com

RENEWABLE ENERGY
IN MICHIGAN
Second in a three-part series
about making sustainable
energy sources a reality
Experts see
promise
in biofuel
production
Producing energy from
plants like switchgrass could
help revive state's economy
By ELAINE LAFAY
Daily Staff Reporter
With the Michigan Legislature reviewing bills
calling for 10 percent of the state's electricity to
come from renewable sources by 2015, some experts
say bioenergy could fuel the state's effort to reach
that goal.
Sen. Glenn Anderson (D-Westland), who spon-
sored the Senate bill, said Michigan must reduce
its reliance on fossil fuels because of th'eir limited
supply and negative environmental effects. He
projected that "by a certain date," up to 15 percent
of Michigan's energy could come from renewable
sources.
While the greatest potential source for alter-
native energy is wind, Anderson said, bioenergy
research also shows great promise. "There are a lot
of things that are currently in the process for bio-
mass," Anderson said. "I do believe that it is a direc-
tion we need to be moving in."
Bioenergy, which contains energy stored from the
sun, comes from plant and animal byproducts like
garbage, crops, manure and wood. Cellulosic bioen-
ergy comes from plants like willow and switchgrass,
a prairie grass, that aren't used in food production.
Anderson said bioenergy was a source Michigan
needed to incorporate into its "general equation,"
but that for alternative energy as a whole, it was too
soon to rely entirely on it.
Danielle Korpalski, an environmental associ-
ate for Environment Michigan, an organization
See BIOENERGY, Page 3

A TWIST ON GREEK WEEK

Taylor '
retrial
to start
today
Jury was deadlocked in first
trial over Dickinson's death
By JOE STAPLETON
Daily Staff Reporter
The retrial of Orange Taylor III, a suspect in the
alleged rape and murder of Eastern Michigan Univer-
sity student Laura Dickinson, is set to begin today, five
months after the initial case was deemed a mistrial
because the jury was hopelessly deadlocked after three
days of deliberations.
Dickinson, 22, was found dead in her dorm room
Dec. 15, 2006. Taylor, a 21-year-old from Southfield, is
charged with open counts of murder, which means the
jury could charge Taylor with either first- or second-
degree murder if he's found guilty.
Several Eastern Michigan administrators came
under fire after the incident for initially telling Dickin-
son's parents and the media that no foul play was sus-
pected in the incident.
After it was announced that Dickinson had been
found naked from the waist down, with a pillow over
her face and semen on her thigh, an independent inves-
tigation and a U.S. Department of Education report
found that the university had violated a federal law
requiring full disclosure of campus security issues.
The findings led the school's Board of Regents to fire
then-president John Fallon. Vice President for Student
Affairs Jim Vick and Public Safety Director Cindy Hall
were also forced to resign.
The retrial was set to begin yesterday, but jury selec-
tion lasted the entire day because the pool was so large,
at about 100 prospective jurors. Judge Archie Brown,
who presided over the firsttrial, will hear the case at the
Washtenaw County Trial Court on East Huron Street.
During the first trial, the prosecution argued that
Taylor snuck into Dickinson's dorm room, raped her
and then killed her.
See RETRIAL, Page 3

CLIF REEDER/Daly
Ricky Winowiecki, a senior in the College of Engineering, and Lisa Goldman, an LSA freshman, play Twister on the Diag as
part of Greek Week, which aims to raise money for charitable organizations. Each round began with multiple contestants
who were progressively eliminated as they lost balance.

SACUA may evaluate independent studies

Nadine Hubbs, a Women's Studies and School of Music professor, listens in during a
talk about gender and class in popular music at the Michigan Union yesterday.
In talk, profs tie popular
film, music to academics

Country song.
"Redneck Woman"
deconstructed as
cultural symbol
By PHILIP GUICHELAAR
Daily StaffReporter
Last night, a University professor
used country music star Gretchen
Wilson's popular song "Redneck
Woman" to help explain what she
calls the "virile female" in country
music.
The description, an attempt
to analyze the cross-cultural ties
between gender, class and popular
music in academic work, was just
one of many examples professors
gave last night to explain how the
three genres intersect.

Nadine Hubbs, a professor in the
School of Music and Women's Stud-
iesDepartment,joinedMichaelBer-
trand of Tennessee State University
and Sherry Ortner of the University
of California at Los Angeles in read-
ing scholarly essays before a medi-
um-sized Kuenzel Room crowd in
the Michigan Union.
Between reading her essay,
"Musical Cross-Dressing as Class
Rebellion: Gretchen Wilson and
the Country Rhetoric of the 'Vir-
ile Female,' Hubbs played clips of
the song. About 40 people, mostly
middle-aged women and female
students, attended the forum.
The two-hour presentation
resembled a typical humanities lec-
ture, with several students fervent-
ly taking notes, others nodding off
and one woman finishing a sudoku
puzzle.
See ARTS, Page 7

Wi
st
und
The
mittee
discuss
ating a
grams"
would
sity's i
indepe
studies
The
these
ies pro
of arti
Arbor
demic
athlete
coursec
John
Hagen
erally:
work tc
The
the nu
enrolle
ture, S
elor of
increas
after th
Sport
major
athlete
standa
Phat
Smith,,

th academics for for the creation of a task force to
evaluate the University's special
udent-athletes programs and all general stud-
ies programs offered by different
er fire, profs take schools or colleges.
a closer look The response to Smith's pro-
posal was mixed among members
of SACUA. Biology Prof. John
ByANDY KROLL Lehman, the group's secretary,
Daily News Editor said such a task force would be a
"political hot potato" and would
Senate Advisory Com- need the backing of the entire
on University ,Affairs Senate Assembly, which is the
ted the possibility of evalu- larger body of University faculty
ll "special academic pro- members from which SACUAs
yesterday, a decision that members are elected.
expose all of the UniVer- "You always run the risk that
ndependent study courses, somebody is going to stonewall,
ndent majors, and general or close ranks," Lehman said.
programs to new scrutiny. "What you have to do is you have
heightened attention to to empower whatever task force
courses and general stud- it is with the full authority of the
grams comes after a series Senate Assembly, which gives it
cles published in The Ann the ability to call University offi-
News, claiming that aca- cers before them and hear their
advisers steered student- testimony."
s into independent study Lehman said that if SACUA
staughtbyPsychologyProf. did create a task force to evaluate
Hagen. The articles said these programs, it would need to
graded these courses lib- carefully choose who worked on
and required little course- the taskforce to ensure that the
o earn a passing grade. evaluations would be considered
series also claimed that substantive and unbiased.
mber of student-athletes "If you properly craft the mem-
d in the College of Litera- bership in a way that these are
cience and the Arts's Bach- perceived as very even-handed
f General Studies degree people and you give them author-
ed over the past 10 years ity they need, you wind up with
e Division of Kinesiology's some report coming forward that
Management program, a has credibility with the faculty
once favored by student- and the community at large," he
s, implemented tougher said. "If you don't do that, it's just
rds. going to be regarded as some kind
rmacology Prof. Charles of whitewash."
chair of the SACUA, called See SACUA, Page 3

classical Studies Prof. David Potter, the incoming chair of the Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs, suggested that SACUA take a closer look at
some of the University's independent study courses during a meeting yesterday.

SACUA'S NEW CHAIR
The committee, the executive board
of Senate Assembly, which is the
main faculty goverving body at the
University, selected new leadership
yesterday.

Classical Studies Prof. David Pallet wbose
curtenttterm as vice-chair etds April 30,
won the chairmanship of the committee by
a 4-3 margin, replacingPharmacology Prof.
CharlesB. Smith.
Engineering Prof. Michael Thouless will
replace Potter as vice chair of the commit-
tee after a 6-1victory.

WEATHER H i:45
TOMORROW LO:27

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INDEX NEWS .................................2 ARTS...................5
Vol.CXVi,No.125 SUDO KU..............................3 CLA SSIFIEDS....................6
@2008The Michigan Daily OPINION ................. 4 SPORTS.............................. 8
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