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February 08, 2008 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-02-08

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2 - Friday, February 8, 2008
MONDAY:
In Other Ivory Towers

TUESDAY:
Arbor Anecdotes'

WEDNESDAY:
The Extremist

THURSDAY:
Explained

MEDICAL RELIEF

Tipping their hat to tradition

Woven into campus cul-
ture here at the University are
a number of popular traditions
embraced by students.
Never step on the bronze "M"
on the Diagbefore take you a blue
book exam. All new students have
to walk through the Ingalls Mall
fountain in bare feet before they
start classes. And every student
has to spin The Cube at least once
while at the University.
But some University tradi-
tions, like Cap Night, which once
thrived on campus near the turn
of the century, simply don't sur-
vive the test of time.
The earliest mention of Uni-
versity students and their class
caps came when the class of
1872 opted for caps made of blue
broadcloth with small tassels and
the class numerals inscribed in
silver braid.
In 1880, seniors chose a new

style with maroon mortar board
fez caps.
A year later, underclassmen
joined in on the cap-wearing
tradition. While seniors wore
maroon fez hats with gold tassels,
juniors and sophomores wore dif-
ferent styles of white caps and
freshmen wore black mortar
board-style caps with cardinal
tassels.
In the early 1900s, all freshmen
classes began wearing grey caps
with a colored button designating
their school or department.
Although the tradition of wear-
ing caps was long established, the
first Cap Night was celebrated on
June 11, 1904.
A mass student meeting was
held around a bonfire near the
Medical Building where students
sang songs and made speeches.
The current freshman class
decided to burn the grey caps

they had worn all year as a sym-
bol of their "graduating" from the
lowest rank to sophomore status.
In 1906, Cap Night was offi-
cially assigned to take place on
the first Saturday in June.
Under Student Council's direc-
tion, students marched to a loca-
tion east of the main hospital
building referred to as "Sleepy
Hollow."
There, commendable athletes
were awarded "M" letters, and
songs, cheers and speeches hon-
ored the occasion.
As the University's enrollment
grew and class sizes increased,
class spirit dwindled and classes
became more reluctant to wear
their own caps.
In September 1934, Class
Council put an end to Cap Night
because of a lack of class spirit.
BETH WITTENSTEIN

LSA junior Tyler Frank sorts medical supplies for Children of
Abraham, an interfaith humanitarian organization. The group
hopes to send about $1 million in supplies to a clinic in Tanzania.

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4

CRIME NOTES
Two cars engage
in fender-bender
WHERE: East Quad
WHEN: Wednesday at about
6:40 p.m.
WHAT: Two vehicles were
involved in an accident and
suffered minor damage, the
Department of Public Safety
reported. The two drivers
exchanged information but
did not officially report the
accident.
Cash stolen in
Couzens Hall
WHERE: Couzens Residence
Hall
WHEN: Wednesday at about
7:35 p.m.
WHAT: About $100 in cash
was stolen from a jacket in a
room in Couzens Hall, DPS
reported. The money has not
been returned. Police have no
suspects.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

MCard swiped
at CCRB
WHERE: Central Campus
Recreation Building
WHEN: Wednesday at about
11:20 a.m.
WHAT: A student reported that
his M Card was stolen in the
CCRB, DPS reported. He said it
was taken from his shoe while
he was playing basketball.
Duo arrested for
entry, marijuana
WHERE: Central Campus Rec-
reation Building
WHEN: Wednesday at about
9 p.m.
WHAT: Two subjects not affili-
ated with the University were
arrested for unlawful entry at
the CCRB, DPS reported. They
were found with what was
suspected to be marijuana and
were charged with violation of
a tontrolled substance.

Music
scholarship
conference
WHAT: A conference about
the state of music research
with a keynote address by
Fred Maus, professor of
music theory at the Univer-
sity of Virginia.
WHO: Michigan Music
Theory Society
WHEN: Today at 1 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League,
Kalamazoo Room
World music
performance
WHAT: The Chicago Classi-
cal Oriental Ensemble, made
up of professional musicians
from around the world, will
perform music from the
North African, Egyptian,
Levantine, Turkish, and

Armenian repertoire. Ticket
prices range from $20 to $40.
WHO: University Musical
Society
WHEN: Today at8 p.m.
WHERE: Rackham Audi-
torium
Celtic dance
performance
WHAT: Laim Irish Dance
will perform a "Celtic
Remix," dancing to every-
thing from lively traditional
Irish music to Red Hot Chili
Peppers and hip-hop. Tickets
are $5 for students, $8 for
non-students.
WHO: University Musical
Society
WHEN: Saturday at 7:30
p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Theater
CORRECTIONS
. Please report any error
in the Daily to correc-
tions@michigandaily.com.

BusinessProf.JanSvejnar's
run for the presidency of
the Czech Republic will be
decided tomorrow when the
country's parliament votes on
its new president. Although
the public doesn't vote in the
election, several polls show
a majority of Czech citizens
favoring Svejnar..
2 The Michigan women's
basketball team defeated
Penn State last night 68-
53. The win snapped a three-
game losing streak against the
Nittany Lions.
FOR MORE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE 9
In Knoxville, Tenn., a
man was charged with
felony vandalism for
shooting at cameras on traffic
signals, ABC affilliate WVLT
reported. At his hearing, the
man passed out teddy bears
and Snickers bars to reporters.

Dozens arrested in NYC Clinton, Obama raise
in raids on Gambino mob millions as race heats up *

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THE DAILY?
E-mail
herring@michigandaily.com

Mafia leaders also
targeted in Sicily
NEW YORK (AP) - Authorities
arrested dozens of people yester-
day in a sweeping Mafia takedown
aimed at closing the book on
decades-old gangland killings
and other crimes and knocking
out what's left of the once-mighty
Gambino family.
A federal indictment in Brook-
lyn named 62 people, including the
three highest-ranking members of
the Gambino clan and the brother
and nephew of the late John Gotti,
the notorious boss who ran the
family in its heyday. State prosecu-
tors separately charged 26 others
with running a gambling ring that
took nearly $10 million in bets on

professional and college sports.
The New York raids coincided
with an Italian operation, code-
named "Old Bridge" and centered
on the Sicilian capital of Palermo,
targeting Mafia figures who were
strengthening contacts between
mob groups in Italy and the United
States.
Authorities said the investiga-
tions, though technically uncon-
nected, signaled an international
attempt to disrupt Sicilian ties to
the Gambino family, which has
been decimated by prosecutions
since Gotti's fall.
The U.S. investigation ensnared
whatever members of the Gambi-
nos hierarchy were still at liberty
and will bring "closure to crimes
from the past," U.S. Attorney Ben-
ton Campbell said.

"H ILARIOUS
AND HEARTFELT.
B RI LIANT
BEHIND-THE-SCENES LOOK
AT WHAT IT TAKES TO
MAKE AMERICA LAUGH."
-JohrnBtakBostonHW

Candidates spend
on ads for crucial
upcoming states
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Bat-
tling for every dollar and delegate,
Barack Obama raised $7.2 million
in Super Tuesday's wake and Hill-
ary Rodham Clinton pulled in $6.4
million, stunning totals reflecting
the intensity of their neck-and-
neck race for the Democratic pres-
idential nomination.
Keenly aware of Obama's grow-
ing strength, Clinton challenged
him to five debates in the next
month. Obama initially put her
off, then later agreed to two.
"We'll have some debates,"
Obama promised. But first, he
said, "I've got to spend time with
voters." Clinton, he argued, is bet-
ter-known to voters in states com-
ing up on the primary calendar.
Clinton, who loaned her cam-
paign $5 million in the run-up to
Super Tuesday, brushed aside the
notion she has money problems.
She pointed to the roughly even
split of delegates still being allo-
cated from Tuesday's primaries
and caucuses as evidence her cam-
paign has the financial muscle to
compete.
"We're going to be fine," said
Clinton. "By the end of the week,
we'll be back on track," she told
ABC.
Top Clinton advisers offered to
work without pay, but that wasn't

necessary with the sudden influx
of cash.
National campaign chairman
Terry McAuliffe, in a conference
call with 300 Clinton fundrais-
ers nationwide, assured them:
"All staff 100 percent paid. Not an
issue."
Indeed, whatever the current
balance in the money chase, both
candidates have been raising and
spending incredible sums.
Each raised $100 million last
year and sped through at least $80
million. That compared to $128
million raised by all the Demo-
cratic candidates combined dur-
ing 2003, the comparable period
four years ago. President Bush,
running uncontested, pulled in
$129 million of his own that year.
Any financial crunch for Clin-
ton would be largely due to lopsid-
ed fundraising in January, when
Obama pulled in $32 million to her
$13.5 million.
"Obama was able to do what
no one thought possible, which is
to finance Super Tuesday," said
Anthony Corrado, a campaign
finance expert at Colby College in
Maine. "He was able to advertise
in more states, went on TV ear-
lier in more states and put more
resources into ground efforts in
most of these states."
Looking ahead, Corrado said,
the question for Clinton is whether
she will have the cash needed for
expensive advertising campaigns
in upcoming contests including
Ohio, Wisconsin and Texas.

0
0

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