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February 08, 2008 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-02-08

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No2 Wli nes gear utortshowdown
with top-ranked Miami (Ohio) Sotae

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, February 8, 2008

michigandaily.com

HIGHER EDUCATION
Granholm
proposes
'U' funding
increase
'U' would receive 3.2 percent
boost in state funding under
governor's request
By EMILY BARTON
Daily News Editor
Gov. Jennifer Granholm asked for a 3.2 percent
increase in state funding to the University of Michi-
gan in the budget proposal she released yesterday.
The proposed budget would increase state funding
to every university in Michigan by at least 2.3 per-
cent. Universities would receive more based on the
amount of research they conduct, the graduation rate
and the percentage of low-income students.
The University of Michigan and Wayne State Uni-
versity would each receive a 3.2 percent increase
based on their amount of commercialized research.
Michigan State University would receive a 2.7 per-
See FUNDING, Page 3
FUNDING HIGHER ED
® Gov. Granholm proposed different funding increases for each
of thestate'suniversiies basedontheirresearch,graduation
rates and enrollment of low-income students. Each university is
guaranteedatleast a2.3 percentfunding increase.
" UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN -3.2 percent increase
" MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY-2.7percent increase
" WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY -3.2 percent increase
" LAKE SUPERIOR STATE UNIVERSITY -6.2percent increase
" EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY --2.3 percent increase
For more information on the budget, See Page 3.

For members of the Michigan wrestling team, every moment of wrestling season isa moment spent preparing for meets and becoming mentally tough.
Wrestling with themselves
A behind-the-scenes look at the Wolverine wrestling team

By MARK GIANNOTTO
Daily Sports Editor
Belgian waffles are Jeff Marsh's
digestable release.
It's not like he needs to eat one
before every match, but for the fifth-
year senior, the breakfast treat is a
mental thing.
It's a routine Marsh has followed
during his years on the Michigan
wrestling team. He wakes up five
hours before weigh-ins and heads
over to Benny's Family Restaurant
on South Industrial Avenue with
some teammates.
On this afternoon, the opponent,

Minnesota, has changed, but the hab-
its remain the same. Marsh arrives
promptly at 1 p.m., accompanied by
sophomore Anthony Biondo and red-
shirt junior Tyrel Todd. None of the
Benny's employees recognize him,
but you can tell that Marsh and his
teammates are familiar with their
surroundings.
As Marsh sits down for breakfast
- eating what he calls Super Waffles,
making sure to cover them with
strawberries and whipped cream
- the reality sets in: this is one of
the few activities during the gruel-
ing season that allows him to feel at
ease.

Comfort is the reason Benny's has
become a tradition for Marsh; he
needs some weakness to indulge in
or else he'll go insane.
A wrestler's insanity takes on var-
ious forms. It's keeping your weight
down, battling injuries, looking over
your shoulder, losing confidence or
simply dealing with school.
It's a sport where mental defi-
ciency is exploited and strength is
rewarded.
After four days with the team and
its coaches leading up to Michigan's
Big Ten-opening weekend against
Purdue and Minnesota, it became
clear that a wrestler's mental strain

never subsists - not in practice,
and certainly not when match time
comes.
WEDNESDAY, TWO DAYS
BEFORE THE PURDUE MATCH:
This year's team is a laid back
bunch - maybe a bit too much
depending on who you ask. It's 3
p.m., and some on the team still
haven't yet climbed the stairs from
the locker room to the cramped
wrestling room in the back halls of
Crisler Arena. Others are stretching
out or schmoozing with coaches.
See WRESTLING, Page 3

New Engin. classes aimed at innovators

'U' keeping A2 economy
afloat during state recession

Some developing
ideas for businesses
that would thrive in
Michigan economy
By LINDY STEVENS
Daily StaffReporter
Before they became some of
America's most successful busi-
nessmen, Microsoft's Bill Gates,
Apple's Steve Jobs and Google
founders Larry Page and Sergey
Brin were all just college kids
-some of them dropouts - with
big ideas.

Their success stories have
become the new American dream
for many brainy college students.
But some University students tak-
ing classes in entrepreneurship
at the University say Michigan's
struggling economy has them
developing business plans for
other reasons.
The College of Engineering is
offering three new entrepreneur-
ship classes this term, with each
being taught by University alumni
and faculty and local business
owners looking to give students
an insider's perspective.
Jeffrey Schox, University
alum and Ann Arbor-based
attorney, recently finished

teaching a one-credit course
explaining how to get patents,
copyrights and trademarks for
business ideas.
Schox said he taught a simi-
lar class a few years ago, but his
students this term had a stron-
ger entrepreneurial spirit. He
said the economic struggles in
Michigan have driven people
to develop their own business
ideas.
"There has been a dramatic
shift in the Michigan economy
over the past few years," Schox
said. "Students don't look at Ford,
Toyota or GM as being secure jobs
anymore, and are now looking at
See CLASSES, Page 7

MIDDLE E rAST D EBA TmEc
Controversial profs coming to campus

Recent business
acquisitions have
helped city's
economy
By JAKE HOLMES
Daily StaffReporter
The University could be provid-
ingtheTefloncoatingthat's protect-
ing Ann Arbor from an otherwise
crumblingstatewide economy, local
business experts say.
Although the state of Michigan
has the highest unemployment rate
in the nation, the city has been an
exception to the statewide trend of
economic recession.
According to the Michigan
DepartmentofLabor and Economic
Growth, the state's unemployment
rate has steadily climbed from 6.5
percent in March to 7.6 percent in
December. But over that same peri-
od,Washtenaw County'sunemploy-
ment rate has hovered around just 5
percent - the lowest in the state.
Jesse Bernstein, president of
the Ann Arbor Area Chamber of
Commerce, said the University
deserves much of the credit for the
city's relatively low unemployment
rate, having created a wealth of job
opportunities in the area.
Between Jan.2006 and Jan.2007,
the University and the University
Hospital system created 427 new
See ECONOMY, Page 7

A sign seeking employees rests inside a Potbelly's window on State Street. The
city's unemployment rate of 4.7 percent is much lower than the state's rate of 7.6
percent.

THE JOBLESS OF MICHIGAN

Mearsheimer and
Walt authored book
about Israel lobby
on Capitol Hill
By DANIEL STRAUSS
Daily StaffReporter
John Mearsheimer and Stephen
Walt, co-authors of the controver-
sial book "The Israel Lobby and
U.S. Foreign Policy," will speak at
the University March 14.

Mearsheimer, a political sci-
ence professor at the University
of Chicago, and Walt, a political
science professor at Harvard Uni-
versity, have taken heavy criti-
cism for their book "The Israel
Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy,"
which argues that a powerful
group of Israel supporters influ-
ences the United States Congress
to create and pass policies favor-
able to Israel.
The book originally appeared as
an essay in the Margh 2006 issue
of the London Review of Books,
where it contended that the U.S.

and Israel hold a "special relation-
ship" where the U.S. goes out of
its way to advance the interests
of Israel, motivated by a hidden
"Israel lobby" in the U.S. govern-
ment.
In August 2007, the article was
expanded into the book "The Isra-
el Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy."
In the original article in
the London Review of Books,
Mearsheimer and Walt describe
the lobby as the most powerful
foreign policy motivator in the
country.
See SPEAKERS, Page 7

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* Michigan
Ann Arbor

Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec
2007
INFORMATION cOURTESY: MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

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INDEX NEW S..................................2 CROSSW O RD ........................6
Vol. CXVll,No.93 OPINION ...........................4 CLASSIFIEDS....................6
C2008The Michigan Daily ARTS.. . ....S PRT ......SPORTS.. . ............9
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