100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sra Supermen
Men's gymnastic's team beats No. 1 OSU to
Department of Musical Theater launches performance of The Who's 'Tommy' at Power Mesu Si.
Center. Arts, page 8 SportsMonday
GN I, NEL)UN \-NTEElr N YEARS EDITPORAL FRE E OM

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

Ft

riday, April 13, 2007

THE UNIVERSITY
AND THE BIG THREE
Second in a three-part series about how
the American auto industry's troubles
affect the University
Ford, DaimlerChrysler and General Motors have been three of the University's largest
benefactors over the years. Now, even as the companies struggle, they're...
STILL DONATING

Ford giving down,
GM donations up as
industry bleeds
red ink
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily Staff Reporter
The rise of the American auto
industry decades agobrought with
it an economic boom in southeast
Michigan. The industry brought
financial security to millions and
was a benefactor to countless
charities and foundations.
One of the biggest recipients of
the auto company's largesse was
the University of Michigan. The
land for its Dearborn campus was
even donated by the Ford Motor
Company.
Times have changed. The Big
Three are in financial trouble.
While the economic struggles
have brought with them some
drop-off in donations from the
industry to the University, the
decline hasn't been as dramatic as
some might expect.
Donations fromFordandDaim-
lerChrysler have fallen over the
last five years. General Motors,
though, has tripled its giving to
the University, according to data
supplied by Judith Malcolm, the
University director of develop-
ment communications.
GM gave almost $2 million to
the University in the 2006 fiscal
year, more than it had in the previ-
ous four years. That upward trend
seems likely to continue - GM has
already given the University more
than $2 million in the current fis-
cal year.
The three companies gave the
University a combined $4.4 mil-
lion last year, slightly down from
the $4.6 million the University
received from them in 2002.
According to the data, Ford gave
the University about $2 million in
the 2006 fiscal year - less than
half than what the company gave
it in the 2005 fiscal year, when it
donated $4.469 million.
Ford has given the University

about $850,000 in the 2007 fiscal
year to date, Malcolm said. With
the fiscal year ending in June,
it seems likely that Ford's total
donations will drop again.
In 2005, Ford suspended a pro-
gram in which the company would
match every contribution its
employees made to the University,
said James Vella, the president of
the company's charity fund.
"We've had to cut back in some
areas in terms of community sup-
port," Vella said.
The program yielded $333,000
for the University in 2005, Vella
said. Of that, $302,000 went to the
University's Ann Arbor campus
and $31,000 was split between the
University's Dearborn and Flint
campuses. In 2004, the Univer-
sity received $341,000 from the
matching program.
Vella said Ford hopes to rein-
state the program within the next
two years.
DaimlerChrysler's donations
have fluctuated over the past
several years. Last year, the com-
pany gave the University about
$490,000. That's about $150,000
more than it gave in 2005, but still
less than the roughly $720,000
the company gave in 2002.
DaimlerChrysler has given the
University about $375,000 so far
this year.
Although the company's dona-
tions have changed from year to
year, it has remained dedicated
to supporting the University, said
Brian Glowiak, vice president
of DaimlerChrysler's charitable
fund.
"If you look at the past five
years, the fund has been consis-
tent in giving to the University in
support of scholarships, curricu-
lar development and lab equip-
ment, for example," he said.
The auto industry will continue
giving to the University in part to
court graduates who might other-
wise ignore a career in the Ameri-
can auto industry, Vella said.
"The University has so many
talented students on campus, and
we work hard on our relationship
in order to attract many of them,"
he said.

5
3

Off campus,
a greater risk
for fire

0
5
4

41,

- $720,420
$473500 $330,870 $322,850 $490968 $377,630

0
5
4
3
N2
f C

$1.921 $2032
million millron

19 student fire deaths
near campuses
around U.S. this year
By TARYN HARTMAN
Daily StaffReporter
At 4:30 a.m. on a Thursday in
October 2005, Scott Perrin's phone
rang. He woke up.
"The house is on fire - get out!"
said a voice on the other end of the
line.
Thanks to the phone call, Perrin,
then a senior in the College of Engi-
neering, escaped from his house
at 730 Arbor St. before flames
destroyed it.
"It was a freak incident that I
left my phone on that night," Per-
rin said.
There's no telling what would
have happened if he had turned his
phone off. Perrin said he couldn't
remember whether the smoke
detectors in his house ever went
off.
Shortly after Perrin emerged
from his basement bedroom,
another one of his six housemates
- the last to escape the blaze
- dove headfirst through the win-

Fire and housing
Last in a three-part series
about fire danger in stu-
dent housing

dow of his second-story bedroom.
Perrin said fire inspectors thought
his housemate opened his bedroom
door and found the hallway on fire
before jumping through the win-
dow.
"I remember standing outside,
watching my house burn down, all
my belongings going up in flames,
and thinking, 'Is this real?'" Perrin
said.
Perrin's experience is hardly
uncommon, though.
According to Campus Firewatch,
a monthly newsletter published by
former Center for Campus Fire
Safety director Ed Comeau, a
total of 108 fire-related fatalities
have occurred on or near college
campuses since January 2000.
Eighty-one percent of those deaths
occurred in off-campus housing, he
said.
Nineteen students have died in
fires near colleges since August,
making this academic year the
most deadly since Comeau began
See FIRE, page 3

$1879
million

0

20o dnatrriscal yerroatre
sOURCE: JUDITH MALcOLM, THE UNIVERSInn' DRECcO O
DONOR RELATIONS

CAMPAIGN 2008
McCain makes stop in Michigan

For senior, today
is 'Peace Day'

'08 hopeful faces
tough challenge from
Romney, Giuliani
in state primary
By ALESE BAGDOL
Daily StaffReporter
WEST BLOOMFIELD TOWN-
SHIP - After naming a slew of
Arizona natives who have tried and
failed to be elected president, Sen.
John McCain began his keynote
speech at the third annual Ron-
ald Reagan Memorial Dinner with
these words: Arizona might be the
only state where mothers don't tell
their children they can be presi-
dent.
The guests, who paid $150 to
attend the event and support the
9th and 11th congressional district

the Republicans across the coun-
try surveyed favored McCain. He
trailed Giuliani by 22 percent and
had the least support of any major
Republican candidate in Gallup
polling of likely Republican voters
since the firm started tracking the
2008 race in November.
McCain was the top choice in
a March poll of Michigan Repub-
licans with the support of 30 per-
cent of respondents, but Romney
has deep roots in the state.
Romney's father was governor of
Michigan from 1963 to 1969.
McCain was speaking yesterday
just miles from Romney's boyhood
home of Bloomfield Hills. Republi-
can Congressman Joe Knollenberg,
who represents the 9th District
and was at last night's event, has
endorsed Romney. McCain does
have some high-profile support in
Michigan, though. Attorney Gen-
See MCCAIN, page 3

Student moonlights
as motivational
speaker
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily StaffReporter
If you call LSA senior Kevin
Szawala
on his cell
phone and
he doesn't
pick up, i
you'll get his '
voice mailj
He'll ask you e:
to leave your
name, phone SZAWALA
number and
a detailed message describing
what your passionate about.

Szawala, a motivational speak-
er and co-hostof"Keepin' it Real,"
a motivational talk show on the
campus television station WOLV-
TV, said he is passionate about
Peace Day, an event he organized
to promote collaboration between
student groups on campus.
Szawala said he expects more
than 1,000 people to attend the
event, which is sponsoredby Theta
Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority,
the Black Student Union, Expect
Respect and Phi Delta Theta Fra-
ternity. The event, scheduled from
2 to 6 p.m. today in the Michigan
Union Ballroom, will include
music performances,speeches and
poetry recitals by students.
"I grew from embracing diver-
sity," Szawala said. "Now I want
others to grow too."
Szawala, a South Lyon, Mich.
See PEACE DAY, page 3

DEREK BLUMKE/Daily
Arizona Sen. John McCain speaks at a Republican fundraiser last night at a West
Bloomfield Country Club. McCain continues to campaign in Michigan today.
Republican parties, laughed. he may end up being just one more
But if McCain doesn't catch up name on that list.
with Rudy Giuliani in the polls A Gallup poll conducted April
and Mitt Romney in fundraising, 2-5 found that just 16 percent of

TODAY'S HI 47
WEATHER LO:27

HAVE A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

ON THE DAILY BLOGS
The Order of Angell holds a forum
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THEWIRE

INDEX
Vol. CXVII, No.135
02007 The Michigan Daily
michigandailygcom

NEWS......
SUDOKU..
OPINION.

.2 ARTS...........
.3 CLASSIFIED
..4 SPORTS.......

' P:!Y4' 5: UIF. ° 3 z r . 3t <: r r- Y' _ 1 ~!r. Y F' .
.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan