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January 08, 2007 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-08

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2A - Monday, January 8, 2006

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

2A - Monday, January 8, 2006 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

Sandwich number 2 is number 1
Deconstructing Zingerman's most popular sandwich

Even on a rainy Sunday after- ing, Swiss cheese and sauerkraut,
noon, the line at Zingerman's Deli- between thick slices of grilled Jew-
catessen stretched out the door ish rye bread, are worth the wait.
yesterday. Families, couples and "It's the best thing I've ever
students crammed into Ann Arbor's tasted, and I think most customers
most famous deli, chatting excited- would agree," Mills said.
ly about which sandwich to order. The deli aims to create sandwich-
The most popular choice by far was es with balanced flavors, Mills said.
listed on the menu as number two, The slight sweetness of the melted
the Zingerman's $12 Reuben. Swiss cheese and homemade dress-
Hundreds are sold daily, deli ing counters the salty flavor of the
manager Patrick Mills said. On foot- corned beef. The sauerkraut adds
ball Saturdays, Zingerman's sells moisture to the layers of meat and
more than 700 Reubens, he said. cheese inside, and the bread, one of
"The bread, the corned beef Zingerman's best sellers, is impor-
and the size of the sandwich make tant, too.
it the most popular choice," Mills "Without the crispy crust - the
said. "People come from New crunch factor - it's just not the
York and California, even France same Reuben," Mills said.
and Germany, to buy our sand- Paul Saginaw and Ari Weinz-
wiches." weig, who founded Zingerman's in
The wait is usually between 15 1982, used to get up at 4 every morn-
and 25 minutes, but most say the ing and drive around Detroit to find
layers of corned beef, Russian dress- ingredients for the Reuben, one of

the restaurant's originals.
Although sandwich prices, which
range from $6-$13, are more expen-
sive than at most places, business at
Zingerman's remains brisk. Zinger-
man's isn't guilty of price inflation
- just using the best ingredients,
Mills said.
"We need to remember that with
the Swiss cheese being flown in
from Switzerland, no one is making
a huge profit off of this sandwich,"
he said.
Zingerman's will even ship its
Reubens anywhere in the country.
Four sandwiches, with shipping
and handling, cost $75.
EMILYANGELL
- Each Monday this semester,
The Extremist will find Ann Arbor's
best and worst, biggest and smallest.
E-mail suggestions to news@michi-
gandaily.com.

ALLISON GHAMAN/Daily
Loren Mindell, a student at Eastern Michigan University, slices
a Reuben while working at Zingerman's Deli in Kerrytown. The
Reuben is the bestselling sandwich at the restaurant.

Che Midligan 4il
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The Michigan Daily (ISSN10745-967) is published Monday through Friday duringthe
falland winter termsbystudentsattheUniversityof Michigan.Onecopyisavailable
freeof chargetoallreaders.Additionalcopiesmay bepickedupattheDaily'soffice
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CRIME NOTES
Man caught
scrubbing up in
public bathroom
WHERE: Shapiro Undergradu-
ate Library
WHEN: Thursday at about
11:15 p.m.
WHAT: Library staff called to
report a man washing his body
in the bathroom, DPS reported.
The man, who was not affili-
ated with the University, was
escorted out of the building.
Seven minors.
given MIPs
WHERE: West Quadrangle
WHEN: Saturday at about 1:45
a.m.
WHAT: Seven minors, includ-
ing three students, were given
citations for possession of
alcohol, DPS reported. Police
responded after residence hall
staff called to report a loud
party taking place.

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Hockey fans
refuse to leave
Yost Arena
WHERE: Yost Arena
WHEN: Saturday at about 4:20
p.m.
WHAT: Several hockey season
ticket holders refused to coop-
erate or leave the building, DPS
reported. By the time police
arrived on the scene, they had
left the premises.
Man throws brick
through window
WHERE: 500 block, East Uni-
versity Avenue
WHEN: Sunday at about 1:15
WHAT: A pedestrian reported
seeing a man throw a brick
through a bank window, DPS
reported. DPS and the Ann
Arbor Police Department
searched for the suspect, but
did not find one.

Housing fair in
Michigan Union
WHAT: An event showcasing
on- and off-campus housing
opportunities for students
WHO: University Hous-
ing's Housing Information
Office
WHEN: Today from 1 to 4:30
p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union
Ballroom
Speech about
human rights
in Iran
WHAT: A speech titled
"Power structure in Iran and
practical ways of changing
it"
WHO: Fatemeh Haghighat-
joo, a former Iranian parlia-
ment member and human
rights expert
WHEN: Today from 4 to 6
p.m.
WHERE: International Insti-

tute, 1080 South University
Ave.
Anonymous and
free HIV testing
WHAT: Anonymous HIV
testing for members of the
campus community
WHO: A counselor from
The HIV/AIDS Resource
Center
WHEN: Today from 6 to 8
p.m.
WHERE: Office of LGBT
Affairs, Room 3200, Michi-
gan Union
CORRECTIONS
. A story in Friday's Daily
(Public Policy dean to step
down) said Public Policy
Dean Rebecca Blank e-
mailed faculty to announce
her resignation on Jan. 2.
The e-mail was sent on Nov.
21.
Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

0

Google has joined forces
with scientists building a
$350 million telescope. The
company is expected to use the
information and images from
the telescope to add to its online
mapping software, which
already offers maps of Earth,
the Moon and Mars.
Freshman forward Ekpe
Udoh has become known
as one of the best blockers
on the Michigan men's basket-
ball team. He averages almost
two and a half blocks per game
- the second best average in
the Big Ten.
FOR MORE, SEE PAGE3B
According to a new study,
60percentoflastyear's top
160 films at the box office
showed characters smoking.
The films contained an average
of 15 smoking scenes per hour.
Films of the 1950s averaged 10
cigarette scenes per hour.

Study: NASA probes may
have killed life on Mars
WASHINGTON (AP) - Two the newresearch.
NASA space probes that visited A water-hydrogen peroxide mix
Mars 30 years ago may have stum- stays liquid at very low tempera-
bled upon alien microbes on the tures (-68 degrees Fahrenheit),
Red Planet and inadvertently killed doesn't destroy cells when it freez-
them, a scientist theorized in a es, and can suck scarce water vapor
paper released yesterday. out of the air.
The problem was the Viking The Viking experiments of the
space probes of 1976-77 were look- '70s wouldn't have noticed alien
ing for the wrong kind of life and hydrogen peroxide-based life
didn't recognize it, the researcher and, in fact, would have killed it
said in a paper presented at a meet- by drowning and overheating the
ing of the American Astronomical microbes, said Schulze-Makuch, a
Society in Seattle. geology professor at Washington
In the '70s, the Viking mission State University.
found no signs of life. But it was "The problem was that they
looking for Earth-like life, in which didn't have any clue about the envi-
salt water is the internal liquid ronment on Mars at that time,"
of living cells. Given the cold dry Schulze-Makuch said.
conditions of Mars, that life could Schulze-Makuch acknowl-
have evolved on Mars with the key edges he can't prove that Martian
internal fluid consisting of a mix of microbes exist, but given the Mar-
water and hydrogen peroxide, said tian environment and how evolu-
Dirk Schulze-Makuch, author of tion works, "it makes sense."
0
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dafly
a tidtijn? a t u Production Department
is hiring ad designers!
E-mail Chelsea at chelbh@umich.edu for more information

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