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January 08, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SAM BUTLER:OBAMA,
YOUR TIME IS LATER
OPINION, PAGE4A

IN'CHILDREN, A DYSTOPIAN
FUTURE A LOT LIKE THE PRESENT
WOMEN'S HOOPS ENDS 28-GAME CONFERENCE SKID SPORTSMONDAY ARTS, PAGE 5A

Addomolml- -got 46P 4w
Illic4loan 43at lij

n Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

"I tend to agree with the ladies in lavender."
- Kath Borg, the mother of a Michigan cheerleader, lending her support to a group protesting Penn State
women's basketball coach Rene Portland's discrimination against lesbian players

Monday Janoary 5 62007
On campus,
a wireless
headache

Some PCs clash
with 'U' software,
but Macs are safe
By BRIAN TENGEL
Daily StaffReporter
As LSA junior Katherine
Musbachpreparedforherhis-
tory lecture in Angell Hall,she
turned on her Toshiba laptop.
Before she could start typing,
an error message appeared on
the computer screen. Her lap-
top immediately shut down.
Musbach's problem has
become a common one.A com-
patibility problem with the
University's wireless system
has prevented many students
and faculty from accessing
the internet.
"As soon as the computer
turns on and detects the wire-
less system, it shuts off," Mus-
bach said. "It won't turn back
on unless you disconnect the
wireless adapter."
Musbach said the blue
screen appeared on her com-
puter only for a moment -
barely long enough for her to
read the content of the error
message.
Students have reported
problems with the wireless
network in Angell Hall, the
Undergraduate Library, the
Graduate Library and East
Hall - and the issue could be

more widespread than that.
The University doesn't
appear to be changing its net-
work to accommodate these
computers. Rather, students
have to remedy the problem
themselves.
The trouble is caused by
a conflict between the Uni-
versity's wireless network
and the drivers used by the
popular Intel 2200bg wire-
less card. For the card to work
with the University's wire-
less system, computer owners
must upgrade their drivers
- software that allows the
operating system to utilize its
hardware.
Students can fix this prob-
lem themselves, said Engi-
neering junior Eric Vander
Weele, an employee at the
University Computer Show-
case in the basement of the
Michigan Union. He outlined
a series of steps that include
visiting the Intel website and
downloading a new driver for
the laptop. There's no need
to uninstall the old driver, he
said.
LSAjuniorJoshTishhouse,
another Showcase employee,
said the problem isn't consis-
tent with a certain brand of
personal computer. It depends
solely on what driver was pre-
installed onthe computer.
The problem isn't unusual,
Tishhouse said, adding that
many students bring their
See WIRELESS, page 7A

Activists donned purple shirts at the women's basketball game against Penn State yesterday to protest Penn State's coach, who once said she had a "no drinking, no drugs, 00olesbi-
Fans protest coach s
antile Isbian policies

Fans in purple
cheer Blue, blast
Penn State coach
By LISA HAIDOSTIAN
For the Daily
Move over, Maize Rage.
The Lavender Menace was
out in force at yesterday's
women's basketball game.

About 250 fans wore purple
shirts with "Lavender Men-
ace" printed on them in black
letters.
The people in purple
weren't making a fashion
statement. They were pro-
testing the head coach of
the visiting Penn State team,
Rene Portland, who has a his-
tory of discriminating against
players because of their sexu-
al orientation.
According to several for-

mer players, Portland used
to have a "no drinking, no
drugs, no lesbians" policy.
Until Penn State revised its
nondiscrimination policy in
1991 to protect against dis-
crimination based on sexual
orientation, Portland openly
and explicitly expressed her
opposition to homosexuality
on the team.
For years, no one took a
public stand against Port-
land. Her policy hit headlines

when former player Jen Har-
ris filed suit against Portland
in October of 2005.
According to Harris,
Portland booted her from
the team because the coach
thought she was a lesbian.
Penn State investigated the
allegations and determined
after an internal review that
Portland's stance on homo-
sexuality created a "hostile,
intimidating, and offensive
environment," according to

the official report by the uni-
versity's Office of Affirmative
Action.
Although Portland's
actions were found in vio-
lation of Penn State's anti-
discrimination 'clause, the
university administration did
not fire her. She was issued a
written reprimand that was
added to her official file,
forced to pay fines and made
to attend a diversity work-
See PROTEST, page 7A

AN INTEL-LIGENT SOLUTION
How to fix your computer's problem with the University's wireless:
0 Goto www.intel.com.
" Click on "Support & Downloads" and then clickon "Download Center."
" Select "Wireless" from thebaron the left.
0 Select "Wireless LAN Products."
" Choose the driver that applies to your wireless card.
0 Download and install the driver.

Good Time Charley's, a popular bar and restaurant, faces an uncertain future as it closes for renovations
and is put up for sale.
Good times o hold at
South bar for now

Forty
days on
bended
knee
Christians begin
prayer session
of biblical
proportion
By KATIE WOODS
Daily StaffReporter
Usually, hundreds of peo-
ple crammed into a fraternity
on a Saturday night means a
party.
When the clock struck
midnight on Saturday at
Christian fraternity Phi
Alpha Kappa, though, more
than 100 students had gath-
ered to pray. Packed onto
sofas, huddled on the floor
and leaning against the
walls, students sang joyfully
and closed their eyes in med-
itation as they kicked off the
40 Days of Prayer, an event
sponsored by 10 campus
Christian groups.
Students can sign up for
as short as half an hour or as

Participants in the 40 Days of Prayer hold hands and pray at the event's kick-off at Phi Alpha Kappa frater-
nity house on Saturday night, Organizers aim to have at least one person praying at the house at all times over
the next 40 days.

Charley's closed
for renovations,
up for sale
By TARYN HARTMAN
Daily StaffReporter
A small piece of paper on
the door of Good Time Char-
ley's, a popular campus bar
and restaurant, says "Good
Time Charley's is closed for
renovations. We will re-open

Thursday, Feb.1."
After closing for the holi-
days on Dec. 22, Charley's
didn't reopen at the start of
the new semester.
No one seems to know
how long the building at 1140
S. University Ave. will stay
locked.
The restaurant, including
its liquor license and equip-
ment, has been listed for sale
on the McKinley Broker-
age Services website since
November.
Manager Nicholas Crooms

said employees had asked
Rick Buhr, the bar's owner,
whether it was going to
reopen after break. Accord-
ing to Crooms, Buhr told
them it would.
Buhr and Jim Chaconas,
the agent responsible for
dealing with potential buy-
ers, could not be reached for
comment.
Although the bar's owners
have not officially informed
employees of a change in
ownership, many employees
See CHARLEY'S, page 7A

much as an entire night of
prayer time in a designated
room in the Phi Alpha Kappa
house. They can sign up for as
little as a half hour, or as much
as an entire night. Organizers
aim to have someone praying
at all times over the next 40
days.
"In this school it is easy to
get lost as a Christian," said
LSA senior Ashley Hajski.
"This event can help us be
together under our God."
Philip Michael, a junior in
the School of Music, Theatre
and Dance, planned the event
with LSA junior Jeffrey Chin.
Michael said he sees 40 Days
of Prayer as an opportunity

for religious people from dif-
ferent backgrounds to come
together.
"Our major goal is to see
a revival on campus as far
as Christian enthusiasm or
people following Christ to get
more involved in their spiri-
tual life," Michael said. "Our
event is open to all Christian
denominations and non-
Christians alike."
World Reach, an interna-
tional Christian missionary
group, has helped organize
similar events at campuses
across the country, helped set
up a website called PrayUM.
org, where students can sign
up for prayer times. The orga-

nization also gave campus
organizers maize and blue
wristbands with the phrase
"Pray UM."
Throughout Saturday
night, students poured into
the house to join the prayer
session and look at the des-
ignated prayer room, which
was no bigger than a standard
dorm room.
The room's walls were bare
except for sheets of white
and yellow butcher paper on
which participants can write
their prayers.
At the front of the room,
a wooden cross hung over a
bowl of water. Students can
See PRAYER, page 7A

TODAY'S
WEATHER

HI: 33 GOT A NEWS TIP?°
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know,

COMING TUESDAY
From the University's annual housing fair, an
update on the rental market NEWS

INDEX NEWS......
Vol. CXyI,SNo.y71t U5DOoK .
@2007 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com O PI N ION..

..2A ARTS .............
..3A CLASSIFIEDS..
.4A SPORTS..........

NA

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