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January 19, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-19

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OTBALL .ALASKAN DISPATCHES FROM THE DAILY:DON'T GIVE UP
T A BG MA N I G .C EETROIT SCHOOLS
PAGE 2 THE DAILY BLOGS FROM FAIRBANKS MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THEGAME OPINION, PAGE 4
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EN Y AI

Ann Arbor, MichiganM

www.michigandaily.com

nday. January i9, 207

CHANGES ON THE BOARD

Family,
friends
remember
'go-to guy'
Turner, 27, was REMEMBERING RYAN
headed to Army

after graduation
from dental school
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily Staff Reporter
Those who knew him well
remembered Dentistry student
Ryan Turner as a man with a
taste for adventure who was
devoted to his friends, family
and country.
Turner collapsed early
Wednesday morning while
exercising at the Central Cam-
pus Recreation Building and
was pronounced dead a short
time after. He was 27.
The unexpected tragedy left
Turner's friends and family in
shock. He had no known health
problems and lived a healthy
life, said fellow Dentistry stu-
dent A.J. Lytle. Turner didn't
smoke or drink heavily, and he
exercised regularly.
Preliminary results of an
autopsy showed that Turner
died of natural causes, said
Diane Brown, Department of
Public Safety spokeswoman.
A natural athlete, Turner
played varsity football and
baseball at Willamette High
School in Eugene, Ore. He
graduated from high school in
1998. At Oregon State Universi-
ty, where he earned a bachelor's
degree, as well as at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, he played in
intramural leagues.
Turner completed basic
Army training with Lytle two
summers ago. The two friends
used money provided by the
Army to pay for their dental
training and shared plans to
begin serving as Army dentists
in July.
The arrangement would
have combined several of
Turner's passions: his country,
traveling, new experiences and
helping people.
"He was what you would call
a 'go-to guy,' " Lytle said. "He'd
drop what he was doing to do
something for you or with you."
Lytle recalled a weekend
Turner kept him company on
the long drive to upstate New
York so that Lytle could attend
a bachelor's party.
"He just said, 'I've never
been to New York - lets go,'

A memorial service for Den-
tistry student Ryan Turner is
scheduled for10 a.m. Saturday in
the Sindecuse Atrium at the School
of Dentistry. It is open to those
who knew him, family said.
even though we only had two
days."
Dentistry student Andrew
Green, a housemate of Turner's
also remembered him as fun-
loving.
He and Turner frequented
local bars like Leopold Brothers
and Mitch's after its reopening to
play pool and have a few beers.
Green and Turner met on
their first day as School of Den-
tistry students three years ago
when they moved in together.
Green was just a name Turner
picked out of a list of incoming
School of Dentistry students
looking for housemates, but
they fastbecame friends.
"It felt like he was a buddy of
mine I'd had for years," Green
said.
Turner came to Ann Arbor
knowing no one, so his social
life largely revolved around the
School of Dentistry, Green said.
Dentistry had always been
important to his life, family
members said.
Turner decided he wanted
to be a dentist when he was 11
or 12 years old, said his mother,
Kim Turner.
"He loved his patients," she
said.
He was a representative of the
American Student Dental Asso-
ciation, a group that advocates
for the legal interests of dentists.
Through the association, Turn-
erhelpedpushfor anationalsys-
tem for licensing dentists.
"He wanted to get rid of the
idea that the dentist is scary,
that it's painful," said his
brother, Eric.
Turner's parents, stepfather,
two brothers and his sister
came to Ann Arbor yesterday
after learning of Ryan's death.
Turner's close friends received
the grieving family.
"Ryan's friends are the best
friends we've ever met," said
Brian Ble, Turner's stepfa-
ther. "They've taken care of
us amazingly over the last few
days. It's a credit to Ryan. His
friends are amazingbecause he
was amazing."

Regent Julia Darlow (right) took her seat on the University Board of Regents monthly meeting yesterday. She replaced Domino's Pizza CEO and former Michi-
gan defensive end David Brandon (left), who served for eight years before losing his reelection campaign in November.

REGENTAL HANDOFF

Darlow brings
new perspective

It's not the end
for former 'M' end

By JAKE HOLMES
Daily StaffReporter
Although newly elected
University Regent Julia Dar-
low (D-Ann Arbor) didn't get a
chance to voice her opinions at
her first meeting on board, that
doesn't mean she's shy about
expressing them.
Darlow said her priorities
during her eight-year term are
affordability and diversity in an
interview last month.
Citing a national survey
that gave the University an

"P' for affordability, she said
she wants to keep tuition low
so potential students won't be
discouraged from attending
because of the cost.
"I think we need to be focused
on how we can ensure that all
different people in Michigan
who qualify can have the oppor-
tunity to come here," Darlow
said.
Darlow said she was discour-
aged by the passage of Proposal
2, which banned the use of affir-
mative action by public institu-
See DARLOW, page 7

By BRIAN TENGEL
Daily StaffReporter
Sitting in a white leather
chair in his plush second-floor
office yesterday, David Bran-
don, CEO and chairman of
Domino's Pizza, looked back on
his eight years as a member of
the University Board of Regents
yesterday.
Brandon, a Republican from
Ann Arbor, lost his bid for
reelection to Democrat Julia
Darlow in November. He served
on the board for eightyears.

A former defensive end on
the Michigan football team,
Brandon is an imposing figure
whowalksasifhe is perpetually
approaching the line of scrim-
mage on the gridiron. When-
ever the University is the topic
of discussion, though, Brandon
breaks out in a genial smile and
assumes an air of unguarded
sincerity.
As Brandon speaks about
the University, he exudes pas-
sion and gratitude, giving the
impression that it has done so
See BRANDON, page 7

ADMISSIONS UPDATE
Digital system prompts
acceptance rate increase

STRIKE ONE FOR MOTT'S

Completed apps
up 11 percent
By WALTER NOWINSKI
Daily StaffReporter
A new paperless system
being used by the Office of
Undergraduate Admissions
Department this year has led
to a dramatic increase in the
University's acceptance rate
compared to the same time
1 last year, officials said.
As of Dec. 31, acceptances
had increased by 12.3 percent

from the same time last year.
This year 65.9 percent of the
applications reviewed before
the end of December were
admitted, compared with
only 53.6 percent last year.
During the same period,
completed applications to the
university jumped by about 11
percent.
Chris Lucier, associate
director of undergraduate
admissions, said applications
and acceptances to the Uni-
versity increased because the
new system is better at expe-
diting admissions decisions
for top applicants.

Most applicants undergo a
three-stage review process.
Applications are evaluated
first by a general admissions
counselor and then sent on to
a secondary counselor who
specializes in the region the
applicant comes from. After
these two reviews, the appli-
cation is sent on to an upper-
level manager who makes the
final admissions decision.
The new paperless sys-
tem expedites the process
by removing several physical
steps. Last year, applications
had to be transported from
See ADMISSIONS, page 7

MS. COLEMAN GOES
TO WASHINGTON
The University of Michi-
gan joined Michigan State
University and Wayne State
University in filing a brief
with the U.S. Supreme Court
Wednesday in response to
a suit filed by militant pro-
affirmative action group By
Any Means Necessary.
The brief reiterates the
University's argument first
laid out in December in
response to another BAMN
suit before a federal judge.
The argument was that it
should be allowed to com-
plete the current admissions
cycle before being forced to
implement Proposal 2.

Detroit Tigers third baseman Brandon Inge bowls at Colonial Lanes last night. The Tigers hosted a benefit
for C.S. Mott children's Hospital and the Detroit Tiger Foundation. Fans bowled alongside Tigers players, who
signed autographs and posed for pictures.

TODAY'S
WEATHER

HI: 28 GOT A NEWS TIP?
LO: 11 Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

COMING MONDAY
Is'Letters From Iwo Jima' one of the year's best
films? ARTS

INDEX NEWS......
Vol. COOII No. 79 UOK
(2002 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com OPINION..

.2 SPORTS,. . ............5
.3 CLASSIFIEDS........................6
.4 A RTS ..... .............. .........8

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