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September 28, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-09-28

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2A -The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 28, 2006
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Assrciatdolltgiatt Prass.

Unidentified parents walk from a staging area
and head to asnearby elementary school in Bai-
ley, Colo., yesterday. A gunman took at least five
people hostage at the Platte Canyon High School.
Adult gunman
fires shot at school,
takes hostages
Man shoots girl, kills himself
after hours of negotiations; motive
still unknown
BAILEY, Colo. (AP) - A gunman took six girls
hostage at the high school in this mountain town yester-
day, holding authorities at bay for hours before shooting
and critically wounding one of the girls, then killing
himself as SWAT team members moved in.
The gunman, believed to be between 30 and 50 years
old, was cornered with the hostages in a second-floor
classroom and released four of them, one by one.
Park County Sheriff Fred Wegener said authorities
decided to enter the school to save the two remaining
hostages after the suspect cut off negotiations and set
a deadline. He said the suspect had threatened the girls
throughout the four-hour ordeal and had shielded him-
self with the hostages.
The gunman was not immediately identified, and the
sheriffdwas at a loss to explain a motive.
"I don't know why he wanted to do this" Wegener
said, his voice breaking.
After the suspect entered the building, hundreds of
students at Platte Canyon High School were evacuated
in a scene that recalled the horror at Columbine just a
short drive away.
Students said the bearded suspect wore a dark blue
hooded sweatshirt and a camouflage backpack. The
sheriff said the man threatened to set off a bomb he
claimed to have in the backpack. The man was also tot-
ing a handgun.
Authorities had what they described as "sporadic"
negotiations with the suspect and urged him to contact
them for more discussion. Officers eventually crept
close to the building, and there were reports of an
explosion inside.
A short time later, someone wheeled a gurney inside
and took an unidentified person to a medical helicopter
parked on the school's football field.

NEWS IN BRIEF r
HEADLINES FROM AROUND THE Nq
WASHINGTON
House OKs terrorism detainee bill
The House approved legislation yesterday giving the Bush administration
authority to interrogate and prosecute terrorism detainees, moving President Bush
to the edge of a pre-election victory with a key piece of his anti-terror plan.
The mostly party-line 253-168 vote in the Republican-run House came
shortly after senators agreed to limit debate on their own nearly identical bill,
all but assuring its passage today.
Republican leaders are hoping to work out differences and send Bush a final version
before leaving town this weekend to campaign for the Nov. 7 congressional elections.
For nearly two weeks the GOP have been embarrassed as the White House
and rebellious Republican senators have fought publicly over whether Bush's plan
would give him too much authority.
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan
Al-Qaida No. 3 accused of part in Pearl killing
The top al-Qaida operative accused of masterminding the Sept. 11 attacks
either killed or took part in the murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Dan-
iel Pearl, Pakistan's president has alleged for the first time.
President Gen. Pervez Musharraf's claim, made in his memoirs released this
week, could now be used to try to clear one of Pearl's four convicted killers,
who is appealing his death sentence, the prisoner's lawyer said yesterday.
Musharraf accused Khalid Sheikh Mohammed of taking part in Pearl's
killing in Pakistan's largest city, Karachi, following the journalist's kid-
napping on Jan. 23, 2002. Mohammed was arrested in Pakistan in 2003 and
is in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates
Saudis plan fence along border with Iraq
Saudi Arabia is pushing ahead with plans to build a fence to block terrorists
from crossing its 560-mile border with Iraq - another sign of growing alarm that
Sunni-Shiite strife could spill over and drag Iraq's neighbors into its civil conflict.
The barrier, which hasn't been started, is part of a $12 billion package of mea-
sures including electronic sensors, security bases and physical barriers to protect
the oil-rich kingdom from external threats, said Nawaf Obaid, head of the Saudi
National Security Assessment Project, an independent research institute that
advises the Saudi government.
The ambitious project reflects not only concern over terrorism but also grow-
ing alarm over the situation in Iraq.
ALBANY, N.Y.
Clinton's challenger: Too many theatrics
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's underdog Republican challenger accused the
former first lady and her husband yesterday of engaging in timeworn theatrics with
their criticism of President Bush's handling of the hunt for Osama bin Laden.
"Once again President Clinton is wagging his finger with righteous indignation
and once again Hillary Clinton is rushing to his defense" said former Yonkers
Mayor John Spencer. "This act is getting old and the American people realize it."
The broadside from Spencer, with its reference to the Clintons' behavior dur-
ing the early stages of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, came as the political world
buzzed about the former president's testy interview with Fox News' Chris Wal-
lace that aired Sunday.
In the exchange with Wallace, the former president contended that, unlike
him, the newly installed Bush administration ignored bin Laden until the Sept,
11 attacks.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@iichigandaily.com.

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Voted BEST LOCAL WASHINGTON (AP) -
COMEDY CLUB and Afghan President Hamid Karzai
BEST NEW MARTINI BAR calls Pakistani President Gen.
.a tPervez Musharraf "my brother."
byrBut after months of bickering
between the two key allies in the
N A SHOW AND/OR MARTINI BAR PACKAGE global terror fight, President Bush
decided it was time for a family
meeting.
Bush was hosting the two for
5- dinner yesterday night at the
5 White House, a command per-
formance for leaders who have
joined their fortunes to Bush's
antiterror drive since the Sept. 11
attacks of five years ago.
For months, Karzai and Mush-
www umch. d u/-uu i arraf have been trading barbs and
criticizing each other's efforts
to fight terrorists along their
[we don't play favorites.] long, remote, mountainous bor-
der. Afghan officials allege that
Pakistan lets Taliban militants
hide out and launch attacks into
Afghanistan. Musharraf says
Karzai has bad information and
notes that Pakistan has deployed
border.
Karzai says Musharraf turns a
blind eye to hatred and extremism
being bred at Islamic schools in
Pakistan. At one point Musharraf
grid so that every row, column said Karzai is behaving "like an
ostrich," refusing to acknowledge
x contains the digits 1 to 9. the truth and trying to shore up
his political standing at home.
essing or math involved, They also point fingers at one
olve. Good Luck and enjoy! another over al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden and other ter-
ror leaders. Each leader says bin
HiUM Laden isn't hiding in his country
and suggests the other might do
) more to help find him.
All this comes as Afghanistan
j suffers its worst reversals since
the U.S.-led ouster of the extrem-
ist Taliban regime nearly five
years ago.
9 7 The Taliban militants have
regrouped and launched an
offensive earlier this year
whose strength and organiza-
tion took Afghan and U.S. offi-
cials by surprise. They have
81 adopted methods commonly
used by militants in Iraq: sui-
cide bombings, ambushes and
j' 1beheadings. Illegal opium pro-
duction has risen yearly despite
9 billions spent to suppress it,
y syndicati ornand Afghanistan is now the
source of more than 90 percent
of the world's supply.

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