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February 13, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-02-13

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 13, 2006 NATION/WORLD
Cheney accidentally shoots hunter NEWS IN BRIEF 0_
Vice president becomes McBride, said the vice president met ;
with Whittington and his wife at the..
first since Aaron Burr to hospital yesterday. Cheney "was pleased BAGHDAD
shoot a man while in office to see that he's doing fine and in good A 1 ..afa1 ru 1ra ri-mtni et.ri

1

WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice Presi-
dent Dick Cheney accidentally shot and
wounded a companion during a week-
end quail hunting trip in Texas, spraying
the fellow hunter in the face and chest
with shotgun pellets.
Harry Whittington, a millionaire
attorney from Austin, was "alert and
doing fine" in a Corpus Christi hos-
pital yesterday after he was shot by
Cheney on a ranch in south Texas,
said Katharine Armstrong, the prop-
erty's owner.
He was in stable condition yester-
day, said Yvonne Wheeler, spokes-
woman for the Christus Spohn
Health System in Corpus Christi.
Armstrong in an interview with The
Associated Press said Whittington, 78,
was mostly injured on his right side,
with the pellets hitting his cheek, neck
and chest during the incident which
occurred late afternoon on Saturday.
She said emergency personnel travel-
ing with Cheney tended to Whittington
until the ambulance arrived.
Cheney's spokeswoman, Lea Anne

spirits," she said.
The shooting was first reported by the
Corpus Christi Caller-Times. The vice
president's office did not disclose the
accident until the day after it happened.
Armstrong said she was- watching
from a car while Cheney, Whittington
and another hunter got out of the vehicle
to shoot at a covey of quail.
Whittington shot a bird and went to
look for it in the tall grass, while Cheney
and the third hunter walked to another
spot and discovered a second covey.
Whittington "came up from behind
the vice president and the other hunter
and didn't signal them or indicate to
them or announce himself," Armstrong
said.
"The vice president didn't see him,"
she continued. "The covey flushed and
the vice president picked out a bird and
was following it and shot. And by god,
Harry was in the line of fire and got
peppered pretty good."
Whittington has been a private prac-
tice attorney in Austin since 1950 and
has long been active in Texas Republican
politics. He's been appointed to several

AP PHOTO
Attorney Harry Whittington, 78, sits in his his office in Austin, Texas, on
Jan. 25, 2005. Whittington was accidentally shot by Vice President Dick
Cheney during a hunting trip on Saturday.

state boards, including when then-Gov.
George W. Bush named him to the Texas
Funeral Service Commission.
McBride did not comment about why
the vice president's office did not tell
reporters about the accident until the
next day. She referred the question to
Armstrong, who could not be reached
again Sunday evening.

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Armstrong, owner of the Armstrong
Ranch where the accident occurred, said
Whittington was bleeding and Cheney
was very apologetic.
"It broke the skin," she said of the
shotgun pellets. "It knocked him silly.
But he was fine. He was talking. His
eyes were open. It didn't get in his eyes
or anything like that."
Repot
criticize..s
Katrina

XXL .I. l c lL V 1 .C ACJF Fl 11C 1 1.. 11 11 M I..J V V
Shiite lawmakers yesterday chose incumbent Ibrahim al-Jaafari to be Iraq's new
prime minister, endorsing the physician and longtime exile for a second term by a single
vote - thanks in large part to support by a radical anti-U.S. faction.
Al-Jaafari's selection paves the way for the Shiite alliance to begin talks with parties
representing Sunni Arabs, Kurds, secularists and others to form a broad-based govern-
ment, which the U.S. hopes can calm the insurgency so American and other foreign
troops can begin leaving.
Al-Jaafari edged out Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdli during the balloting, largely
thanks to support from followers of Muqtada al-Sadr, the cleric whose militia has staged
two uprisings against U.S. forces since 2004.
Al-Jaafari, who spent years in exile in Iran and Britain, is virtually assured of the
top job once the new parliament convenes and a new president is elected in the coming
weeks. The constitution states that the president must appoint a prime minister
from the largest bloc in parliament.
NEW YORK
Record-setting snow buries Northeast
A record-breaking storm buried sections of the Northeast under more than 2 feet
of snow yesterday, marooning thousands of air travelers and making even a walk
to the corner store treacherous.
The National Weather Service said 26.9 inches of snow had fallen in Central
Park, the most for a single storm since record-keeping started in 1869. The old
record was 264 inches in December 1947.
Wind gusting as high as 60 mph blew the snow sideways and raised a risk of
coastal flooding in New England. And in a rare display, lightning lit up the falling
snow before dawn in the New York and Philadelphia areas, producing muffled
winter thunder.
WASHINGTON
Hoekstra questions value of spying program
Al-Qaida has had plenty of time to figure out how to avoid government prying into
its communications with associates in the United States, says a congressman overseeing
U.S. intelligence, and that probably means the eavesdropping is no longer effective.
"Does anyone really believe that, after 50 days of having this program on the front
page of our newspapers, across talk shows across America, that al-Qaida has not changed
the way that it communicates?" asked Rep. Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.), the chairman of
the House Intelligence Committee.
Although he defended the legality of the National Security Administration's
eavesdropping, Hoekstra said Sunday, "The problem now is the program is really
of questionable value:'

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Gov't-wide failings to
blame for debacle, House
report finds
WASHINGTON (AP) - Unheeded
warnings, poor planning and apathy in rec-
ognizing the scope of Hurricane Katrina's
destruction led to the slow emergency
response from the White House down to local
parishes, a House investigation concludes.
The 600-page reportby a special Repub-
lican-dominated House inquiry into one of
the worst natural disasters in U.S. history
concluded that late state and local evacu-
ation orders exacerbated an untrained and
inexperienced force of federal emergency
responders.
It also said President Bush received
poor and incomplete counsel about the cri-
sis unfolding in the Gulf Coast.
Overall, the House report said, the
federal government's response to Katrina
was marked by "fecklessness, flailing and
organizational paralysis."
"Our investigation revealed that Katrina
was a national failure, an abdication of the
most solemn obligation to provide for the
common welfare," said a summary of the
scathing report obtained Sunday by The
Associated Press.
"At every level - individual, corporate,
philanthropic, and governmental - we
failed to meet the challenge that was
Katrina," the report concluded.
"In this cautionary tale, all the little pigs
built houses of straw."
The House findings mark the first of two
congressional inquiries and a White House
review of the storm response expected over
the next six weeks.
The Senate Homeland Security and
Governmental Affairs Committee was to
continue its own investigation today into
the Aug. 29 storm response by examining
potentially widespread abuse in federal
emergency cash assistance programs for
disaster victims. Up to 900,000 of 2.5 mil-
lion applicants received aid based on dupli-
cate or invalid Social Security numbers, or
false addresses and names, congressional
investigators found.
"Everything that we have found ... con-
firms exactly the indictment of the House
Republicans," Sen. Joseph Lieberman of
Connecticut, that committee's top Demo-
crat, said Sunday. "It's shocking and it is
unsettling."
Excerpts released from the House
report, which issued a total of 90 separate
findings, spreads the blame through all
levels of government.
Among the conclusions:
Late decisions by New Orleans
Mayor Ray Nagin and Louisiana Gov.
Kathleen Blanco to issue mandatory
evacuations in the New Orleans area led
to deaths and prolonged suffering.
The White House was unable to
effectively sort through conflicting
reports about levee breaches and other
disaster developments, preventing rapid
relief.
. .....

Small plane crashes into California home
A single-engine plane that appeared to be performing an aerobatic stunt lost control
and crashed into a suburban home yesterday, killing at least one person on board the
plane and sparking a fire that gutted the house, police said.
The crash killed the pilot, according to the Federal Aviation Administration and
local police. But there were conflicting reports about whether there were other fatali-
ties or if the home was occupied at the time.
The FAA reported two deaths, including the pilot, but fire and police officials at the
scene said only the pilot was killed. The FAA also said two people were missing in the
homes, but local authorities reported the houses were unoccupied.
CORRECTIONS
An article on the front page of Friday's edition of the Daily (Professor nabs three
classical Grammys) incorrectly stated that Prof. William Bolcom had been working
on his Grammy-winning album for 20 years. The article should have said he worked
on the piece itself for 20 years, and finished it in 1984.
A story on the front page of the Jan. 30 edition of the Daily (Amind controversy,
NAACP VP resigns) incorrectly identified LSA sophomore Saddam Shalhout as
Raheam Shalhout.
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.crom.
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI48109-1327
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