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January 31, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-01-31

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 31, 2006 - 7

FILIBUSTER
Continued from page 1
1987 but was never sworn in as a justice.
*We don't do this every time someone is nominated to
the Supreme Court," Kay said. "We're nonpartisan ... we're
about rights."
Nationally, the ACLU has continued to be vocal in its
opposition to Alito's nomination. In his testimony before the
Senate Judiciary Committee on Jan. 18, ACLU Executive
Director Anthony Romero said: "This is a momentous time
in history, and Alito's confirmation to the Supreme Court
would have significant impact on the American people."
Second-year law student Anne Gordon believes Alito's
confirmation would be detrimental to civil liberties and
checks on executive power.
"We've started to see the effects of what an unrestricted
executive can do," Gordon said. "He is not receptive to affir-
mative action or a woman's right to choose. He thinks dis-
crimination is a thing of the past."
ACLU members also urged passersby to call their sena-
tors to let them know that they don't agree with the Alito
nomination.

BENEDEK
Continued from page 1
attending an Ivy League school, his uncle,
a University alum, insisted he come to see
Ann Arbor.
When he arrived, it was hailing.
"It was dreary, cold, snowing, rainy,
dark," he said. "It wasn't as if the Univer-
sity was in the greatest light."
But Benedek soon fell in love with the
University.
"I had never been surrounded by that
kind of energy, even in February," he said.
"It really blew my mind."
John Gillette, a former worker at NBC,
Bendek's friend and fellow alum, remem-
bers his first impression of Benedek.
"Peter was kind of gauky and bumbling
and wearing an army jacket," Gillette

has allowed him to remain true to himself
in the Hollywood lifestyle.
"I still feel that he's the same guy I met
40 years ago, except driving a bigger car,"
Gillette said.
Gillette pointed out one difference
between the Peter Benedek of 40 years
ago and the one of today.
"We were all starry-eyed idealists," Gil-
lette said of their time at the University in
the 1960s. "It's pretty easy to lose that in
the bastion of Beverly Hills and Wilshire
Boulevard."
Benedict's wife, Hollywood screenwrit-
er Barbara Benedek, is best known for her
first script, "The Big Chill," which earned
her an Academy Award nomination.
She co-authored the film with Univer-
sity alum Lawrence Kasdan, a classmate
of Benedek's.
For nearly ten years now, Benedek
has been a force behind the University's
screenwriting program.
"The thing to do was to focus on some-

thing Michigan is known for - writing,"
Benedek said, referring to the University's
leading screenwriting program.
He hopes to help students in their tran-
sitions from the University to Hollywood
and onto successful careers.
"The goal of this program for me is to
provide these students with information
and expertise and teaching experiences,
and to come to L.A.," he said.
Benedek originally moved to Los Ange-
les with the intent of becoming an enter-
tainment lawyer.
Then, as Gillette put it, Benedek real-
ized mediating contracts was much less
desirable than controlling them. Besides
managing actors, Benedek has contribut-
ed to television programs and movies such
as "The Sopranos," "The Sixth Sense" and
"Law and Order."
Despite his success, Gillette said Bene-
dek is an exception to the Hollywood rule.
"After 40 years, he still seems like a
normal person to me," Gillette said.

KOLODGY
Continued from page 1
gone back to training for the Olympics
and his job as a demographic analyst,
they hope to relive their dream.
"The guys who run (the tournament)
gave us free entry for next year;" Velis-
saris said.
Until then, Team France will do its
rounds in the minor leagues, compet-
ing on Monday nights at tournaments
at Touchdowns and on Wednesdays at
Theo's in Ypsilanti.
So if you're of age and feeling a little
ambitious, head over to take on the best
beer pong team in the country.
Or maybe assume defeat, and perfect
an equally useful skill. Flip-cup perhaps?
- Kolodgy can be reached
atmegkolo@umich.edu

said.
Gillette
goofy, but

still describes him as a bit
points out that his personality

SUPER BOWL
Continued from page 1
ice storm the day of the game, and
temperatures dropped as low as 12
degrees with a wind chill of 27 below
zero. The city struggled with traffic
problems all weekend because of the
weather.
But forecasters are predicting bet-
ter weather this year. The forecast
calls for unseasonably warm tempera-
tures for the entire week, but flurries
are still possible. Kilpatrick practi-
cally guaranteed there would not be a
repeat. He said if it snows, the city is
ready to clean it up before it even hits
the ground.
If the weather should turn ugly,
the city of Windsor, Canada has
agreed to shoulder part of the work-
load, even agreeing to allow snow to
be transported across the river to the
adjacent city.
Kilpatrick described the Super
Bowl as a "two-nation destination."
Windsor Mayor Eddie Francis spoke

along with Kilpatrick and Granholm
at the welcoming ceremony.
"When we first thought of the idea of
a two-nation Super Bowl, the interna-
tional Super Bowl, we viewed our role
at Windsor as, 'We can bring Canada
to the Super Bowl,' " Francis said.
Francis said the two cities were
trying hard to make sure the trans-
portation back and forth across the
Canadian border was done as seam-
lessly as possible for those guests who
want to spend time in both cities. For
example, passengers could be checked
for the proper citizenship documenta-
tion prior to boarding buses to Detroit
or Windsor.
Security is obviously a big issue for
both cities' mayors and police.
Detroit Chief of Police Ella Bully-
Cummings said the city would have
an extra 3,000 security personnel on-
hand for the Super Bowl week. She
wouldn't comment on any specific
plans or possible threats, but she said
the Super Bowl is a Level-1 national
security event.
Police officers in Detroit will not

be granted leave from Feb. I to Feb.
5, and they will work 12-hour shifts
to keep a larger-than-normal police
presence. The extra hours will require
overtime, but Bully-Cummings said it
would come out of the federal funding
the city has received from the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security.
She added that much of the man-
power had to be used for traffic con-
trol, and she encouraged visitors to use
the Park and Ride system and walk
around downtown Detroit. There will
be no downtown parking after Feb. 1,
and Bully-Cummings said they were
towing cars very quickly.
Granholm appeared even more excit-
ed than the two mayors. She described
Detroit's can-do spirit as "a virus that
has infected tens of thousands to volun-
teer their time and their talent"
According to Kilpatrick, the city has
more than 10,000 volunteers lined up
for the week's festivities. He said that
when he went to Jacksonville, Fla., for
last year's Super Bowl, he was amazed
by the city's 8,000-plus volunteers and
vowed to surpass that number.

HEARING
Continued from page 1
hibits landlords from showing properties to prospective tenants
until one-fourth of the current lease period has lapsed.
Backers of the ordinance say it would especially benefit first-
year students, who suffer from having to sign a lease for their
sophomore year in October after only being at the University for
one or two months.
"Many students end up living with people they barely know,"
said MSA Rep. Rese Fox said at the hearing.
The ordinance would allow students more to time to look at
resources like the Office of Off-Campus Housing website, Fox
said.
Dan Jones, a local landlord, said the ordinance will hurt the
housing market, especially at his "mom-and-pop" business.
Jones also said a shorter housing season would mean he might
have to lay off one of his employees who he would no longer
need.
Fox said landlords would have happier tenants if they were
given enough time to get to know the people with whom they
choose to live.
LSA junior Joe Golden said the ordinance would reward good
landlords because students would have time to find the landlords
who offer the best properties and living conditions.
But not all students were in favor of the ordinance. LSA soph-
omore Clark Ruper said it would cause a rush of students camp-

ing out in the cold the night before the leases can be signed. "I
signed my lease in November," Ruper said. "No matter the date,
there will still be a rush, but at least it is warmer in September."
In a hearing last November about the issue, landlords far out-
numbered students. This time, it was the opposite.
MSA's City Council liaison, Laura Van Hyfte, said last night's
meeting was a success because the event was highly publicized
and because the External Relations Committee was well pre-
pared.
A mass of students flooded MSA chambers. MSA President
Jesse Levine estimated over 100 people were present at the
meeting. Organizers almost had to shift the hearing to a larger
room to avoid a fire hazard.
A controversy broke out when landlords said they were con-
cerned students might try to avoid the constraints of the ordi-
nance by knocking on doors to view the properties.
Shari Pomprantz, a member of Students for PIRGIM, pointed
out part of realtors' websites that not only condoned such behav-
ior, but also offered to help.
Landlord Fred Gruber jumped up and screamed at Pomprantz
that the websites she had found did not represent all Ann Arbor
property owners. Woods had to calm him down.
Woods said she wasn't surprised by the passion and prepared-
ness of students last night, but she will continue to hear both
sides before deciding.
Greden said the "very informational" hearing brought
up great points, but he has }iot decided whether he sup-
ports the ordinance.

the michigan daily

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LEASING FOR
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CUSTOMER SERVICE -
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Duties include:
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Send resume with salary history to marygal-
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PARTICIPANTS WANTED: JUDGEMENT
and Perception Experiment at UM near
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pays $15. To qualify, must be fluent English
speaker, age 18-30, have vision correctable
to 20/20, and not be taking any psychiatric
medicines. Call Scott at 734-936-8703 or e-
mail slepisto@umich.edu (preferred).

SPRING BREAK 2006
Travel with Experts, Sun Splash Tours-Since
1988. Hottest Destinations-Biggest Parties
Lowest Prices, www.sunsplashtours.com
1-800-426-7710.

URGENT! MONGOLIAN STUDENT needs
housing for 6 wks., Feb. 15-Mar. 24. Call
989-695-6651 (home) or 989-573-1819 (cell).

LOW SEC. DEP., $1,200 OFF W/ 1 YR.
LSE.! Great North Campus loc. Lg. apts.
Heat incl. & pets O.K. Beautiful, landscaped
grounds, lg. walk-in closets. 734-663-8463.
MCKINLEY TERRACE LARGE 1 & 2
bdrm. apts., dishwasher, balcony/patio &
FREE winter shuttle around central & north
campus. 741-9300. annarboraparnnents.net
NEAR UNION LG. contemporary studios to
3 bdrm. apts. 741-9300.
www.annarborapartments.net
NEAR UNION, LARGE 4 bdrm. apt. w/
ldiy. & prkg., dshwshr. $1600/mo. inc. utils.
Avail. Sept Non-smk. 973-6499.
NEED HOUSING FOR FALL 2006?
Fantastic Apartments, Great Houses.
Convenient Central Campus locations.
Stop by our office for a complete brochure!
Campus Rentals
734-665-8825
www.campusrealty.com
NEW 4 BDRM. townhouse close to medical
and central campus. $1400/mo. Call
734-323-3918.
NORTH CAMPUS 1 & 2 bdrm. apts. avail.
January, May & August! Dogs welcome!
FREE winter shuttle around Central & North
campus. MODELS OPEN DAILY! 741-9300.
OFFICE SPACE AVAIL. at 410 E. William,
2 waiting rms., 2 baths., all utils. included,
weekly cleaning services. oldtownreal-
ty ameritech.net or call 734663-8989.
PEPPER'S PROPERTIES. 3 bdrm. apts.
Sept '06. Great loc. on East U. 3 blocks from
East quad. Fum. heat & H20 incl. Prkg.
avail. $1,595/mo. 810-2314)229.
PRIVATE/SHARED RMS. AVAIL. now
and fall/winter. $203419/mo. + food/utils.
ICC Stud. Co-ops, 662.4414 www.icc.coop
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Half off
1st mo. ! Why pay the high A2 prices? Ypsi-
lanti is only 15 min. drive to campus. Leas-
in now! 1, 2, & 3 bdrms. From $595. Free

CORNERHOUSE
APARTMENTS
205 S. State St.
on central campus
2 & 3 bdrm Apt Homes
Beautifully Furnished
Outstanding views
Garage parking
Central air
9 foot high ceilings
Premier campus location
NOW SIGNING
LEASES FOR FALL
Models open daily
734-741-9300
www.annarborapartments.net

NANNY NEEDED FOR 3 mo. old infant in
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jreillylukela@yahoo.com or 604-6303.
SPEND THE SUMMER ON THE LAKE!
Camp Robindel is looking for mature, high
energy, fun loving staff to teach & supervise
children for the summer (June 14-Aug. 13)
on Lake Winnispesaukee in New Hampshire.
We will pay for your transportation, stipend,
room & board. We will be on campus Feb.
5-7. Apply online: www.robindel.com or call
866-265-8577 to set up an interview.
SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
Counselors needed for our student travel and
pre-college enrichment programs, middle
school enrichment, and college admissions
prep. Applicants must be 21 years old by
June 20th and possess a valid driver's license.
We need: Mature, Hardworking, Energetic in-
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WORK ON MACKINAC Island this Season-
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HOW HOT CAN you get? Free hot sauce
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LOOKING FOR ENERGETIC person to
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MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS, MODEL
Make $75-$250/day, all ages and faces
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OFFICE OF NEW STUDENT PROGRAMS
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formation/assistance. Applications are due
by 5:00pm, February 10th and are available
at 3511 Student Activities Building or online
at www.onsp.umich.edu/cur-ent_students

For Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a good day to lie low. Steal
some quiet moments of solitude for
yourself if you can. At best, work alone.
(You might be involved in service on
behalf of others.)
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a social day with friends and
groups. Conversations with a female
friend in particular could be significant
or important to you. Could this be a new
love?
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
This is a good day to talk to parents,
bosses and important people. Do be
aware that you are noticed more than
usual today. Something might occur that
calls attention to you.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Try to break from your routine today.
Do something different. Go someplace
you've never been before. You're hun-
gry for adventure; you're also hungry to
learn something new.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is a good day to take care of
details about shared property, debt, taxes
and insurance matters. Expect to feel
emotionally intense about anything that
you're involved with today.
VIRGO
( - 11 t.,- - 11

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You're playful. Enjoy flirtatious or
pleasant activities with children today.
The arts are also appealing. Watch pro-
fessional sports, or participate if possi-
ble.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You can make good headway at home
and with domestic activities today.
Family discussions might also take
place. Dealings with a parent can go well
today. Family members feel generous
toward each other.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You feel optimistic about your future.
Perhaps a conversation with siblings or
relatives encourages you in some way.
This is a lovely day to schmooze with
others.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is a good day for business and
commerce. It's also a great day for shop-
ping. Whatever you get will either please
you or be a good value.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
The Moon is in your sign today.
Furthermore, it makes lovely aspects to
other planets. This is an easygoing,
pleasant day for you. Enjoy all contacts
with others.
YOU BORN TODAY You like to per-
form. You're naturally entertaining, and
-- . foo -- 1 - - ti 4n nm i

AVAILABLE NOW!!
Campus 2 and 3 bedroom apartments
Furnished and reasonably priced
Call 734.668.1100 or stop
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