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February 18, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-02-18

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 18, 2005 - 7

GOVERNOR
Continued from page 1
in further academic college prepara-
tion to go," Cassis said.
Vacancies in health care, construc-
tion and mechanics were among the
jobs Cassis said are readily available
and can be filled without a college edu-
cation. Health care was one of the tar-
gets for Granholm's "Jobs Today" plan
that would. seek to train and match the
unemployed with jobs in that sector.
Cassis also criticized the new merit
Granholm created that would give
money to students after they have com-
pleted two years of post-secondary edu-
cation, not high school.
"The new award breaks a promise
that if you study hard, work hard and
pass the test that you would be reward-
ed," she said.
The governor's plan includes a pro-
posal to use $2 billion in state bonds for
economic investment - something that
Cassis says worries her.
"Bonds are not free; they are bor-
rowing," Cassis said. At least part of the
bonds would have to be repaid by tax-
payers and would add massive debt to
the budget, she said.
If Cassis is elected, she said, she
would cut taxes and eliminate "handi-
caps" to businesses. She has already
sponsored a bill, along with Garcia, that
eliminated the Single Business Tax and
reduced the business health care penalty
by half. Cassis said as chair of the Senate

Finance Committee and the House Tax
Policy Committee she ushered through
all tax cuts of the past six years.
The first and only Hispanic state
senator in Michigan, Garcia, says he is
strongly considering a run for governor
but may also run for U.S. Senate against
Debbie Stabenow.
"I offer voters a different choice," he
said. Garcia not only holds the position of
state senator but the rank of colonel in the
Michigan National Guard, which he joined
after nine years in the Army reserve and
another nine as a U.S. Army officer.
Garcia was less strident in his crit-
icism of Granholm's bond proposal
than Cassis.
"I think that's she's right to focus on
jobs and the future," Garcia said. "I'm
just a little concerned that we don't solve
today's problems on the backs of our
children and grandchildren."
He said Michigan needs to invest
in high-technology jobs, especially
in the area of life sciences, to help
boost jobs and cut unemployment. But
Garcia said the state should act more
quickly to add jobs.
"Michigan used to be known as the
'Arsenal of Democracy' back in World
War II," Garcia said. "Today, the Depart-
ment of Defense spends $78 billion on
procurement that needs to be made in
America. Why should these jobs go to
other states when we can do it right here
in Michigan?"
Garcia said the state should spend
more than the $740,000 it currently does

to help Michigan businesses get part of
the Pentagon's procurement contracts.
"That's insufficient resources to help
small businesses manage their way
through the red tape and regulations
that want to get a federal contract. It
would help shore up our manufacturing
segment."
Like most other state Republicans,
Garcia disagrees with the governor on
the new merit award.
"I agree with her that we need to
invest in education so that our students
are flexible enough for the world econ-
omy," Garcia said. "The only problem I
have with her proposal is that she wants
to pay students after they've completed
(two years of college). If we pay them
after they get into school, basically,
they'll be using that money to pay back
the loans. They're paying on interest
and on the principal of the loan rather
than paying up front."
Granholm's political spokesman Chris
DeWitt chided Cassis and Garcia for
what he said was too much negativity.
"Governor Granholm has worked to
improve our economy, and there's plen-
ty more work to be done," DeWitt said.
"She's helping to turn that around, and
it's unfortunate that all these comments
from Senators Cassis and Garcia have
all been negative things."
The governor's approval rating has
dropped from 63 percent in August to
58 percent last month, according to
a poll of likely voters conducted by
EPIC/MRA.

CORPORATIONS
Continued from page 1
for the long-term well-being of their respective companies
that they engage in sound practices, and that they and their
scrutinizers were more similar then different.
"Business cannot succeed in a society that fails. It's a
matter of positive self-interest, said Flanders.
The scrutinizers did not reciprocate the affection. About
one-fifth of the audience was dressed in bright red, indicat-
ing their solidarity with the Killer Coke Coalition, an alli-
ance of student groups pushing for the University to cut
contracts with Coca-Cola Company. They protested outside
Hale Auditorium by handing out leaflets contesting Coca-
Cola's defense of its business practices. They, protested
inside the auditorium by holding up signs reading "Diet,
Cherry, Vanilla, Coca-Cola is a killa," and taking advantage
of a brief pause in the discussion with a resounding round of
chants: "What do we want? Cut the contracts! When do we
want it? Now!"
But instead of casting a dark cloud over the symposium,
RENOVATIONS
Continued from page 1
campus.
Other possible facilities include new faculty offices, an
auditorium and a clustered location for student services such
as admissions, financial aid and academic services.
"In the competitive environment of business education, top
schools earn their place by providing high-quality facilities
that outstanding students and faculty expect," Dolan said.
Dolan launched a strategic planning exercise in July 2003
to investigate what needed to be done to update the Business
School's facilities.
"It was great to have two things come together," Dolan said.
"We'd really done our homework figuring out what we needed

the interjections helped fuel a discussion on the need for
both activists working outside the corporations and socially
conscious employees working within to effectively bring
about change.
"Externality is a great driver for change. It's hard for peo-
ple on the inside who want to make a push for change to do
so without external pressure," Flanders said.
The panelists agreed that one of the main barriers pre-
venting the corporations from acting in a more responsible
manner was that they were still accountable to their share-
holders, whose priority is still a steady rate of return on their
investments. Because the benefits of socially and ecologi-
cally sound practices - such as employee loyalty and good
public image - are often unquantifiable, such practices are
difficult to justify in financial terms.
"Breaking the earnings game on Wall Street is gonna be
a challenge," Flanders said. "If anyone wants to come away
from tonight with a challenge, that's a challenge."
The Killer Coke Coalition is putting on a counter-sympo-
sium called, "Verifying the Scrutiny" at 4 p.m. in the Mod-
ern Languages Building.
to do. With Steve's help, it obviously helps a great deal, but we
have a lot more work to do."
Bejasa said renovations were necessary to continue to
attract competitive students to the Business School, which
was ranked as the best in the country for MBA by The Wall
Street Journal last fall.
"Appearance is really important," she said. "If people go
to other schools, like the Wharton School of Business (at the
University of Pennsylvania), and see how nice it looks, then
they might not come here."
The regents also approved Kohn Pedersen Fox as the proj-
ect's architectural firm. The firm has also designed the busi-
ness schools at Stanford and the University of Pennsylvania,
as well as the Institute of American Studies of Oxford and
the London School of Economics.

TUITION
Continued from page 1
year, students may experience
some hikes for next year.
"It simply cannot work
over the long term if we are
to maintain the quality our
students, our faculty and our
alumni expect," Coleman
said.
"I want to reiterate the
commitment I made last year:
We will not compromise our
academic excellence."
Coleman said the University
will strongly encourage state
policymakers to reconsider
their investment in higher
education to ease the burden
placed on the University.

LIBRARIAN
Continued from page 1
to lead one of the nation's leading
research libraries.
"He has been a leader nation-
ally and has made the library very
responsive to faculty and student
needs across the campus in difficult
times. He has been extraordinary,"
said Courant. Another mark Gos-
ling will leave behind is the library's
good financial health, a result of his
dedication to raising support for the
library. Courant said in the release
that Gosling had "energized the
library's fundraising efforts, which
have led to a significant increase
in the library's endowment and
expendable income."
Also noted was Gosling's estab-

lishment of partnerships with other
schools and colleges, which helped to
expand the donor base, the collection
and services.
"Sometimes the University librari-
an is invisible to almost everybody....
This is a guy who really made things
work so long and so well, the Universi-
ty really owes him a debt of gratitude,"
Courant said.
James Hilton, associate pro-
vost for academic information and
instructional technology affairs,
will be filling in as interim Univer-
sity librarian, but Brenda Johnson
and John Wilkin, both associate
University librarians, will be help-
ing to fill most of Gosling's respon-
sibilities.
"Bill's been a terrific leader of the
libraries. My primary job is to make
sure that things continue in a positive

direction," Hilton said, adding that he
was excited for the opportunity to work
more closely with the library staff.
Hilton said that since the Library
has strong management, day-to-day
operations will continue to work as
they do now.
Courant echoed this in the release,
saying Hilton's appointment was
"a strong vote of confidence in the
Library's management team."
He added that the appointment of
Hilton was also very strategic to the
search.
"I wanted someone who could not
possibly be a candidate for University
librarian, because I wanted to conduct
an open search," Courant said.
Hilton said he will work to make
sure the library is prepared for a per-
manent librarian when the search is
completed.

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