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January 25, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-01-25

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 7

ADVICE
* Continued from page 1
Paul said MSA's webmaster, Judy Yu,
is working on a reconstruction of the site.
Yu was not available for comment.
Many students said that Advice Online,
or a similar site, would be a helpful tool in
the registration process.
"I wish that it was still around and I had
known about it," said LSA sophomore
Andrew Kirchner.
"There aren't many other good sites for
rating professors. I know Michigan State
has a good student-run site that everyone
knows about which rates professors."
In the absence of Advice Online, some
students said they rely on their peers for
advice on classes and professors.
"I pretty much just talked to upperclass-
men I knew. The advisors didn't offer too
much advice, and I didn't really know of
any other resources," Engineering fresh-
man Lisa Schauman said.

LIBRARY
Continued from page 1
historic sites while ensuring that
these pieces of American history are
not lost forever, Dow said. ,
Lynn Asp, office director of the
Lincoln Highway Association, said
the Pappas collection will add to the
already large archives of the Lincoln
Highway at the University and con-
tribute to the goals of the association
and of Pappas.
"It's not just the roads themselves,
but the world that sprang up along-
side the roads that people like Pappas
are trying to preserve," Dow said.
"Roadside attractions, the small
cafes and restaurants, gas stations
and lodging houses and later the first
roadside motels have become dilapi-
dated or have been destroyed, and
along with them a part of American
life has disappeared."

Mitch Dakelman, head of the New
Jersey chapter of the Lincoln High-
way Association and a colleague of
Pappas, said Pappas was an avid sup-
porter of historical preservation and
public awareness of highways. Along
with Pappas, Dakelman helped found
the Northeast Chapter of the Lincoln
Highway Association in 1998.
"Pappas was a highway enthusiast
and extremely active in our organi-
zation," Dakelman said.
Asp said the Pappas collection
will attract various researchers and
others, including documentary film-
makers, writers, car enthusiasts, his-
torians and military buffs. "People
from all walks of life are interested
in these archives," Asp said.
"I anticipate that history and soci-
ology majors and researchers in the
history of transportation will find
this collection a rich resource," Dow
said.

STADIUM
Continued from page 1
"I think the renovations are fine as
long as they don't make it too much
of a corporate atmosphere," Mitch-
ell said. "The point of the Michigan
experience is everyone standing and
being together."
LSA junior David Cain said he
is worried that the main motivation
behind the renovations is not to fulfill
what students want.
"To be honest, I feel like it's just
another way for the University to get
money," Cain said.
Other students, such as LSA junior
Marcus Jenkins, agreed that the luxu-
ry suites were a money-making opera-
tion but said it did not bother them.
"The luxury boxes are for those
people who choose to sit in them and
can afford them," Jenkins said. "It is
another way the University can make
more money, and if it doesn't change
the student seating, I say go for it."
The issue of seating capacity also
weighs heavily on the minds of some
alumni, who must place their names
on a waitlist to try to obtain season
tickets for Michigan football games.
University alumnus Robert Dind-
offer, a self-proclaimed Wolverine fan
since birth who graduated last year,
voiced his opposition to the renova-
tions, fearing that the capacity will
decrease and make it harder for alum-
ni to get season tickets.
"I am extremely proud that ...
(Michigan) has had the largest sta-
dium in the country," said Dindoffer,
who plans to put his name on the wait-
list for season tickets.
But there are currently thousands on
that list, Dindoffer said, and alumni
often have to wait years to get tickets.
"If we are going to spend money
on renovations, there ought to be an
increase in capacity, not a decrease,"
Dindoffer said. "I personally feel that

LSA sophomore Kevin Dietz said he generally approves the renovation plans for
Michigan Stadium as long as they do not take away from student seating.

every alumnus who wishes to have a
season ticket should be afforded that
opportunity, and some feel that the list
is unnecessarily prohibitive."
Still, Bruce Cook, who graduated in
1950, was more optimistic about the
proposed changes to the stadium.
"I think it's a move that is appropri-
ate and timely; it needs to be done,"
Cook said. "I have a friend who can't
come to the games anymore because
he can't navigate the steps without a
handrail. The aisles need to be wider
and seats larger."
Cook also commented on the

reactions to the addition of luxury
boxes and the anxiety over the seat-
ing options.
"There is no question that there is
greater demand for tickets than there
is seating available; in terms of alum-
ni it's always been tight, and I don't
see any reason for this to change that,"
Cook said.
"As far as luxury boxes are con-
cerned, as long as it doesn't affect
student seating, I don't know why they
would care. It is hard for me to believe
that (the University) would ever make
it difficult for students to get tickets."

LIKE MASS MEETINGS?
CuOME TO THEDAILY MASS MEETING TOMORROW AT 6P.M.
420 MAYNARD ST.

WARMING
Continued from page 1
effects of commonly emitted aerosols on clouds.
Ice clouds - which are the focus of Penner's study
- form at high altitudes in the atmosphere. It has been
found that aerosols increase the production of ice clouds
in high levels of the atmosphere by providing more par-
ticles for water to condense upon. Penner said that due
to their structure, ice clouds absorb more radiation than
they reflect so an increase in ice clouds could help fuel
global warming.
In contrast, high levels of aerosols in low-level clouds
help prevent global warming. These clouds are made of
liquid water droplets instead of ice and help to cool the
earth because they reflect more sunlight into space than
onto the earth. Increased levels of aerosols cause more
water droplets to form within low-level clouds, which
makes them even more reflective and increases the radi-
ation they reflect back into space.
"People have tried to look into ice clouds, but until you
get a way to include them in a global model, you can't real-
ly do it, so this will be a first," Penner said.
She said climate researchers are working to incorpo-
rate more variables, such as aerosol levels, into climate
models to more accurately model and predict. future
climate changes. Current models frequently are low
resolution and are based mainly on first principals, or
known science equations. To make more accurate pre-
dictions of the future climate, Penner is working to input

real observed data into the models. The ice clouds left
behind jet airplanes is yet another variable Penner is
trying to input into the model.
"We've been looking at what kind of warming aircrafts
might produce, and we are getting values three times high-
er than what other people have estimated. It is a major
difference from previous estimates."
Penner and her graduate student partners have discov-
ered that many of the pollutants from flight tracks in the
atmosphere drift down to the tropics, affecting more than
the general region where the aircraft flew as previously
thought.
"Because the clouds there are so much thicker in the
tropics, you can have a bigger effect there," she said.
"Nobody's looked at ice clouds in the tropics. I am trying
to get to a place where I can write that up for publication
because I think it will be smashing."
Penner hypothesizes that there is a balance between
greenhouse gases that cause warming and the cooling
effect of aerosols, though exactly how much cooling is
occurring is not yet known. Though aerosols may help
cool the Earth's climate, global warming becomes an issue
because green house gases have a larger long-term effect
than aerosols.
"To think to the future, maybe 100 years, we expect
the aerosol effect to eventually be overwhelmed by
greenhouse gases because they accumulate much more
readily in the atmosphere and are not removed very eas-
ily, whereas aerosol is removed every time it rains,"
Penner said.

.... .......

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