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September 10, 2003 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2003-09-10

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 7

DAVID TUMAN/Daily
Students who share copyrighted files are growing more aware of the possible legal
ramifications, due to lawsuits filed by the Recording Industry Association of America.

FILE SHARING
Continued from Page 1
nas to Internet Service Providers in
order to obtain names of file sharers
who may be the subject of future law-
suits.
Though it is estimated that teenagers
make up 50 percent of all file sharers,
Collins said the problem with file shar-
ing "spans all ages, young to old." With
cases involving minors, the lawsuits are
served to account holders - often the
minors' parents.
"There is no free pass. There will be
no more warnings," she added. "We've
been educating the public for a number
of years. There are dozens of legal ways
to get songs online. There is no excuse."
Collins would not comment on
whether any students at the University or
at other campuses were targeted.
"The University is not among those
involved in the original set of lawsuits;'
University spokeswoman Julie Peterson
said. "We are not aware of any lawsuits
involving University of Michigan peo-
ple," she added.
Still, the University has taken meas-
ures to limit file sharing on its network.
"The University pays for Internet con-
nections, so the more the Internet is
used, the more expensive it becomes for
the University," said Elizabeth Loesch,
director of information technology for
University Housing.
As a result, beginning at the end of
last year, "We have limited the amount
of bandwidth allowed for file-sharing,"
Loesch said.
The University does not have any
statistics regarding file sharing on its
network because it does not "monitor
students' Internet usage," Loesch
said. Still, the University does moni-
tor bandwidth usage, though the new
limit has not been released because
the University has not completed the
conversion.
Comcast Corp., the country's largest
high-speed Internet provider, "doesn't
monitor peer-to-peer bandwidth individ-
ually but only looks at an aggregate,"
Comcast spokeswoman Sarah Eder said.
"Peer-to-peer networks do not violate
any existing laws," she added.
LSA senior Beth Clarke said she
doesn't use Kazaa much anymore
because of the recent crackdown on file
sharing.
"Occasionally, I download music,"
Clarke said. "I'd rather hear stuff and see
if I like it before I buy a CD or burn it

from a friend."
"(File sharing) is a good way to get
songs out there. That's how a lot of peo-
ple get popular. I first heard about John
Mayer and Jack Johnson from music on
the Internet and now they are main-
stream."
"It seems bands who are making a big
deal about file sharing have more
money than they know what to do with,"
Clarke said.
LSA junior Eli Zoulas said he doesn't
plan on downloading fewer songs now
than he has in the past.
"One of my friend's friends got sued,
but the chance of me getting sued are lit-
tle because I don't download main-
stream pop music. I don't think Paul Van
Dyk or D.J. Tiesto will care if I down-
load their music. I am not afraid of
being sued because I am not download-
ing big corporations' music," he said.
"I still go and buy CDs and own CDs
of music I downloaded," Zoulas said.
Even though many students are shar-
ing copyrighted music, most agree that
what they're doing is illegal - but that's
not the point, they add.
"I just think that there may be better
things to focus on now," LSA junior
Stacy Dodd said.
"I agree sharing files is illegal but
everybody does illegal stuff, especially
on the Internet," Zoulas said. "I mean,
look at jaywalking or illegal drinking."
RC sophomore Randy Steinhaus buys
most of his music, gets it from friends,
or downloads music on friends' comput-
ers, but said he doesn't believe file shar-
ing should be illegal.
"I think it's illegal to download
movies that aren't released or are still
in theaters, and with music, I think
it's illegal if the music is not
released. Otherwise, it's not stealing,
in my opinion."
"The way I look at it is that if I were a
rich musician, I wouldn't care if some
poor college student was getting my
music for free," Steinhaus said.
Though there are legal ways of
obtaining music online, the ease and
zero cost of downloading music through
peer-to-peer networks prompts people to
continue illegally sharing files.
"People don't have time or money to
buy songs or to get them any other way,"
Clarke said. "It's just too easy to down-
load them."
In present and future lawsuits, courts
will decide the damages, though U.S.
copyrights allow for penalties of up to
$150,000 per song illegally shared.

JOB SEARCH
Continued from Page 1
"Studies have been repeated over
the years showing that 60 to 65 per-
cent of jobs are gotten through net-
working - a tool that is more
powerful than anything else,' Daniels-
ki said.
When you post an application
onto an online recruitment website,
"you have people from all over the
world looking at the same thing,
and it is quite possible that (target)
recruiters will never see it," Daniel-
ski said.
According to a recent article pub-
lished in the Wall Street Journal's
Career Journal, large companies are
often inundated with countless num-
bers of resumes. For example, pharma-
ceutical giant Merck receives 30,000
resumes per month.
"In sending e-mail, it is really easy for
a person to just press delete," Roth said.
Bednar added that she felt most
online applications ended up in the
"giant human-resources trashcan in the
sky."
Still, career counselor Lynne Sebille-
White, assistant director of recruitment
services at the University's Career Cen-
ter, said students should not disregard
online recruiting altogether.
"For (online recruiting) to be most
effective, students must research com-
panies and follow up," she said. "Just
applying online is probably not going
to get you to the next step."
The Career Center maintains its own
online recruiting site called "Mploy-
ment Link," but unlike conventional
Internet-based recruiting websites,
Mployment Link is exclusively for
University students and only registers
recruiters who specifically cater to that
group.
"The companies (on Mployment
Link) have a vested interest in the
students," Sebille-White said.
"They are spending resources to
come to the campus, to interview
and to recruit."
The Business School and Engineer-
ing School each have their own recruit-
ing websites, "iMpact" and
"EnginTRAK," respectively.
In regards to online job seeking,
Sebille-White advised that applicants
should let their own experience guide
them-but that "applicants need to use
a variety of resources and never put all
of their eggs in one basket."
But Danielski was not so optimistic
about the benefits of online job applica-
tion: "don't hold your breath,"he said.

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Hijackings a
'foreseeable
risk,' judge..
concludes
NEW YORK (AP) - Opening the door
to scores of Sept. 11 lawsuits against the
aviation industry, a judge concluded yester-
day that the hijacking and crashing of a jet-
liner was a "foreseeable risk."
U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein said
negligent security screening might have
contributed to the deaths of 3,000 people in
the attacks on the World Trade Center and
the Pentagon and the crash of a hijacked
plane in Pennsylvania.
"The aviation defendants controlled
who came onto the planes and what was
carried aboard. They had the obligation
to take reasonable care in screening," he
wrote.
Hellerstein cautioned that, early in
the legal process, he viewed evidence in
a light most favorable to the plaintiffs
- over the objections of defendants
American and United airlines, the Boe-
ing Co. and the Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey.
The decision involved the cases of about
70 people injured or killed in the attacks.
As a result of the ruling, court officials
were preparing for a possible rush of law-
suits as early as this week as some people
choose litigation over the federal victims
compensation fund. To receive a payout
from the fund, families must agree not to
sue airlines or other entities.
The defendants had sought dismissal of
the lawsuits, saying they had no duty to
anticipate and guard against deliberate, sui-
cidal aircraft crashes and that any alleged
negligence on their part did not cause
deaths and injuries.

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LUNCH
Continued from Page 1
to know them. Office hours can be intimidating," Har-
ris said.
"If it's free, students have nothing to lose," she
added.
English Prof. Lorna Goodison said she would be
interested in the program because getting to know stu-
dents in a social environment is part of her job as an
educator. "I have met students outside classrooms in a

more relaxed setting and they turn out to be quite won-
derful," Goodison said.
Schwimmer said spending time with professors in a
non-academic situation will also make it easier for
them to write letters of recommendation for students in
the future, should they ask for them.
Ideally, about 400 students per semester will partici-
pate, Schwimmer said, adding she hopes all who are
interested take advantage of it.
The program is sponsored by the Provost's Office
and the Division of Student Affairs.

ENGINEERING
Continued from Page 1
of them are more focused on the Ph.D. students, who
are doing research and do not need to learn the basic
information."
Prof. Dennis Assanis, chairman of the Mechanical
Engineering Department, said in response, "This
does happen quite a bit. If you look at individual pro-
fessors, there might be some who prefer to do
research. One might say that's where their heart lies.
They might not necessarily have the gift to be the
best teachers."
At the time of its sesquicentennial, students and staff
seem proud of the college's reputation for academic
excellence, close ties with the industry and other public
services and its dedicated faculty. But professors see
the need for improvement.
"We are at the forefront of public service, transfer-
ring the technology we have to the industry and doing
good things for the country," Assanis said. "We need to
continue to strive for excellence in the face of very
tough competition and budget cuts."
Even amid the event's fanfare, behind the scenes the
college is busy making improvements.

'We are at the forefront of public service, transferring the
technology we have to the industry and doing good things for
the country.... We need to continue to strive for excellence in
the face of very tough competition and budget cuts:'
- Dennis Assanis
Mechanical engineering department chair

"The college is engaged in a strategic planning exer-
cise and is going into an implementation phase. We are
going to improve communication between schools,
improve the faculty environment and focus on under-
graduate education," said Dean Stephen Director.
"Seven years ago, we implemented a new undergradu-
ate initiative, and we need to step back and see how it's
doing."
Since the University offered its first engineering
course in civic engineering in 1854, the college has
made significant advances in science and responded
well to the growing demands of industry. "Our size
and scope allows us to offer a large variety of out-
standing programs," Director said. "We are here to

perform important, relevant research. We have laid
out a five-year plan and continue to strive for excel-
lence."
At the event on the North Campus Diag, student
groups sought to recruit new members, continuing the
tradition of student involvement at the college.
Director and an alum of the school cut a large cele-
bratory birthday cake, after two engineering seniors led
the crowd in a verse of "Happy Birthday, College of
Engineering."
As to the future of the engineering program, Direc-
tor promised to focus on computer science and infor-
mation technology, biomedical engineering and
nanotechnology.

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