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October 11, 2002 - Image 18

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-11

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4B - The Michigan Daily - FOOTBALL SATURDAY - October 12, 2002

7W

U

-W

i

Penn State trio coming into their own
By J. Brady McCollough
Daily Sports Writer M j 5k'. .7 46M A

KEY STATISTICS

(I

EWS
Coleman reaches out to students

Penn State senior defensive tackles
Jimmy Kennedy and Anthony Adams
always held themselves in the highest
esteem -- even when they were just
lowly freshmen.
"Anthony and I used to sit around
freshman year and talk about how we
were going to dominate the Big Ten,"
Kennedy said.
The tackles, along with senior defen-
sive end Michael Haynes, haven't mas-
tered the entire conference, but clearly
showed what they meant by domina-
tion last Saturday at Wisconsin. Penn
State held the Badgers' star running
back Anthony Davis to just 46 yards on
the day and sacked quarterback Brooks
Bollinger seven times.
Kennedy, who was held without a
sack in the Nittany Lions' previous
four games, treated Bollinger like his
personal rag doll, sacking him four
times - a Big Ten record for a player
in a single contest.
"I had a great day," said Kennedy,
who was named the Big Ten Defensive
Player of the Week. "Wisconsin tried to
double Mike Haynes and it opened me
up a little bit. I had an opportunity to
make big plays."
During the first four games, it
seemed like everything was opening
up for Haynes, while Adams and
Kennedy struggled to fight through
consistent double-teaming. Haynes,
the converted fullback, took advantage
and grabbed the spotlight. He current-
ly leads the Big Ten through five
games in sacks (8.5), forced fumbles
(4) and tackles for loss (10.5), and
even tallied two sacks against the Bad-
gers' double-teams.
"He's just been a man among boys,"
Penn State linebacker Gino Capone
said. "He's been dominating with his
pass rush, and I always knew Mike was
a really good player. He's just really
stepped it up."
While Capone called the unit "as
good as anybody in the country," the
trio had more than their share of trou-
ble containing Iowa in State College.

Season Averages MICH
First Downs 19.8

Rushing Yards
Passing Yards
Offensive Plays
Total Offense
Return Yards
Comp/Att/Int
Fumbles/Lost
Penalties/Yards
Time of Poss
M1
PASSING
Player C
Navarre 19
RUSHING
Player Att
Perry 20
Askew 5
Bracken 5
Underwood 4
RECEIVING
Player No.
Edwards 5
Joppru 4
Askew 3
Butler 3

155.8
236.4
77.2
392.2
91
20.2/37.4/0.6
2.2/1.2
5/40
30:35

PSU
23.4
174.2
261.6
68.6
435.8
79
18.2/31/.6
0/0
5/38
24:08

I C H I G A N
-A Yds TD Int
9-35 224 11 4

tt
i
i
3
3

Yds
99.4
25.4
27.3
20.3
Yds
95.6
37.4
24.8
34.0
No.
7
6 2
Yds
48.6

Avg
4.8
5.3
3.6
3.0
Avg
18.4
9.8
7.3
1 0.6

Lg
57
21
13
15
Lg
45
27
30
22

TD
6
0
0
O
5
4
1
0

By Tyler Boersen
Daily StaffReporter
Getting to know the students at
the University is a priority for Uni-
versity President Mary Sue Cole-
man as she kicked off her first in a
series of fireside chats, allowing her
to gain the student perspectives and
giving students the opportunity to
meet her.
Questions for Coleman varied
widely from diversity on campus to
the availability of office hours for
professors. But she used the event to
survey what issues are on the minds
of students - turning questions for
her into questions for the students
and asking for their opinions.
"These are all things that I can put
in my brain and ask questions about.
If they are on student minds I need to
know about it," she said.
In answering questions she high-
lighted her initial goals, including
making sure the Life Sciences Insti-
tute is running smoothly. She said
the Institute was floundering when
she first arrived so she moved quick-
ly to appoint Alan Saltiel as director
of the Institute.
Coleman said she hopes the LSI

will increase opportunities for under-
graduates to help in research endeav-
ors, though she said the University
currently offers many other research
opportunities.
Participants expressed concern for
student safety and campus security.
She said new electronic locks will be
installed on residence hall room
doors and public safety is keeping
closer watch on the residence halls.
When one participant asked about
the stairwells of Dennison Hall, on
which she saw another student trip
because of loose tiles, Coleman
promised to look into the building's
maintenance.
She also said an initiative is under-
way to reduce overcrowding in the
residence halls.
"More students want to live in
residence halls and there is a pres-
sure that wasn't there five years
ago," she said. She added that Vice
President for Student Affairs E.
Royster Harper has hired a consult-
ant to do an analysis of the need for
a new residence hall and to evaluate
the configuration of existing halls.
She said the report should be com-
pleted by spring.
Participants also expressed con-

cern with the effectiveness of Resi-
dence Hall advisors and urged the
increase of compensation for RAs.
Coleman expressed interest in how
advisors are utilized by their resi-
dents. Coleman plans to continue
meeting with students through fire-
side chats beyond this initial
process of learning about the Uni-
versity.
"It is as important after five years
as it is in the first two months. Issues
change and students have different
ideas. I can't assume anything and I
have to keep hearing," she said.
"It was really interesting for me
to hear why students come here and
the pride that they have, but they
also alerted me about some things
- buildings that we need to look at
or that I need to know about, and
the issue of computers and the
interest in wireless networks," she
said.
Coleman, former president of the
University of Iowa, was appointed
president of the University of
Michigan in May and has been serv-
ing full-time since Aug. 1.
Participants asked about her back-
ground and asked why she decided
to leave Iowa.

Courtesy Penn State Athletic Department
Penn State defensive end Michael Haynes has teamed with defensive tackles Jimmy Kennedy and Anthony Adams to form
one of the most formidable defensive lines in the Big Ten.

two weeks ago. The Hawkeyes' mam-
moth offensive line pushed the Penn
State front around, as Iowa tailback
Fred Russell rushed for 142 yards on
35 carries in his team's 42-35 over-
time upset.
"We knew we had to bounce back
from the Iowa loss," Kennedy said.
"We didn't have such a great day
against Russell."
Capone said the change in defensive
intensity and pressure that occurred in
Madison started up front with the
defensive line.
"Those guys are the heart of the
defense," Capone said. "When they
play that way, it makes it so much easi-
er for the linebackers and defensive

backs. It really gets our defense going."
So which player will Michigan
choose to double team? Will it double-
team at all? No matter what the deci-
sion is, Michigan's offensive line -
which has given up just eight sacks in
five games - will have to be ready for
anything.
"They are a force," Michigan coach
Lloyd Carr said. "(Kennedy and
Adams) are not just two big guys that
plug up the middle. They have tremen-
dous quickness."
The Michigan running attack, led by
Chris Perry's 99.4 yards per game,
hopes to exceed Davis' output from
last week. But with Adams and
Kennedy (293 and 316 pounds,

respectively) pounding the middle of
the line, the holes may be a little hard-
er to find.
"They are very difficult to block
because they are not only very physical
but they are quick," Carr said. "They
are hard to get movement on. To run
the football, you have to get that man
out of the hole."
Haynes and Adams have suffered
three straight losses to Michigan.
Kennedy, the fifth-year senior, has seen
the past four. They're hungry, and
they're putting it on themselves to
reverse the trend.
"Every year we lose to Michigan for
some odd reason," Haynes said. "We
are trying to be the difference makers."

PUNTING
Player
Finley
Brabbs
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
LeSueur 2
PUNT RETURNS
Player No.
Curry, J. 3
DEFENSE
Player
Hobson
Drake
Jackson
Kaufman
Oiggs
PASS DEFENSE
Player Int

Yds Avg Lg
284 40.6 50
35 35.0 35
235 47.0 52
Avg Lg TD
24.3 49 0

Yds Avg Lg TDO
S37.6 1 1.8 27 0

Solo
6
3
2
4
3
tYds
t 40
27
46
0

Asst
2
2
3
0

Tot
5
5
4
4

Jackson
Curry
Hobson
Drake
Hobson

3
2
1
1

Lg
13
19
0
46
0

Brk-up
12
2
3
3
3

TO
0
0
0
0

North Campus redesign
plans could add vibrancy

University President Mary Sue Coleman to
in the Michigan Union.
W~I NRWS DR THER14

M' secondary smells Nittany Lions' blood

PASSING
Player
Mills
RUSHING
Player
Johnson, L
Robinson
Mills
RECEIVING
Player
Johnson,.13
Johnson, L
Johnson. T
Williams

P E N N S T A T E
C-A Yds TD
18-30.6 260.4 7

Att Yds
17.2 108.2
4 22.2
8 19.4

Avg Lg TD
6.3 43 6
5.6 28 5
2.5 16 1

3

By Joe Smith
Daily Sports Editor

Michigan senior safety Charles Drake is often
jokingly labeled a "dirty player" in practice by his
teammates.
"I wouldn't call it dirty, but I do get my share of
licks and hits in when they're not quite expecting it,"
Drake said. "Although I may catch some unassuming
freshman off-guard, the older players know that us in
the secondary are just trying to simulate game-like sit-
uations."
But the amount of swagger, trash talk and late
bumps at practice by members of the secondary -
which Drake has nicknamed "The Wolf Pack" -
doesn't rub all Wolverines the right way.
"We get sick and tired of it as receivers," Michigan
tight end Bennie Joppru said with a grin.
Michigan's safeties seemed to be in attack mode in
their last game, when Drake, Cato June and Julius
Curry each recorded sacks. In addition, two intercep-
tions by cornerback Marlin Jackson and another by
Drake translated into three Michigan touchdowns.

But against an explosive Penn State offense this Sat-
urday, the "Wolf Pack" knows it has to be careful not
bite on play-action fakes.
By going for the kill instead of sticking in their
right positions, the secondary could be victimized by
big plays on play-action - something that has been
an Achilles heel for the defense all season long.
"That's something that (Penn State) is probably
going to focus on after watching film," said senior
safety Julius Curry.
Penn State might be the most balanced team Michi-
gan has faced so far. The Nittany Lions average nearly
five yards per carry on the ground, but they also stretch
the field with 260 yards in the air per game. Add intan-
gibles like quarterback Zack Mills' scrambling ability
and tailback Larry Johnson's playmaking skills out of
the backfield, and it seems even more important for
Michigan safeties and linebackers to stay at home in
their zones and not overpursue.
Mills "doesn't really stay in the pocket much,
but when he does he throws the ball very effec-
tively," Curry said. "He can throw off his back
foot 40-50 yards pretty precisely and he can run

the option real well. We're going to have a big
challenge ahead of us."
Despite Mills slightly spraining his shoulder and
Johnson hurting his knee in the Nittany Lions' 34-
31 win at Wisconsin last Saturday, the Wolverines
are expecting nothing but the best from a dramati-
cally improved Penn State offense.
Michigan shut out the Nittany Lions 20-0 last year
in State College, and the Wolverines have won the past
five meetings between the two schools.
But while legendary coach Joe Paterno hasn't rein-
vented the wheel offensively, he helped invigorate his
team's efficiency - which is the main reason Penn
State is 4-1 after five games instead of 1-4 like it was a
year ago.
The Nittany Lions have nearly doubled their total
offensive yardage per game (283.6 to 435.8) and
dramatically increased their average point total (13.8
to 37) compared to this point last year. They've done
this by racking up nearly 100 more yards rushing
and two more yards per carry. And while they're
throwing fewer passes, they're more efficient -
passing for 50 more yards per game.

No.
5.6
4.4
3.6
2.8

Yds
104.2
44.8
60.0
33.8

Avg
18.6
10.2
16.7
12.1

Lg
46
36
44
24

TD
2
3
2
0

PUNTING
Player
Royer
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Johnson, L 8
PUNT RETURNS
Player No.
Johnson. B 16
DEFENSE
Player
Mayer
Capone
Stewart
Haynes
Harrell
Scott

No. Yds Avg Lg
3.6 147.6 41.0 56

Yds
32.2

Avg Lg TD
20.1 53 0

By Maria Sprow
Daily Staff Reporter
Fifty years from now, most University officials say North
Campus won't be the same students are accustomed to, as
the area's open land creates many possibilities for new
buildings and scenery.
But if the visions presented last night by the Taubman
College of Architecture and Urban Planning Dean Doug
Kelbaugh come true, the Arthur Miller Theater will sit
across from Pierpont Commons, and those inhabiting the
Flemming Administration Building on Central Campus will
pack their bags and head for Bonisteel Boulevard.
Retail shops will line Murfin Avenue and a new residential
college will stand at the corner of Murfin and Hayward Street,
leaving academic buildings and a meditation chapel to finish
off the North Campus Diag that surrounds the Ann and Robert
H. Lurie Tower, according to Kelbaugh's proposal.
The Media Union, School of Music, Art and Architecture
Building and School of Information will all be expanded.
New meeting places for faculty and students, including a
convention center and a commons area similar to the Michi-
gan Union, will also add some spice to the area.
"There is a lot of work left to be done on the North Cam-
pus if we want it to be on equal footing with the Central
Campus," Kelbaugh said.
The vision presented by Kelbaugh at his lecture, titled
"North Campus Redux," comes after years of collaboration

on behalf of urban design students, University officials and
executive officers, as well as deans from various schools
and colleges.
"I don't think we are going to have one unified campus.
It's not going to happen," Kelbaugh said during the lecture,
speaking about the distance between the North and Central
campuses. "(North Campus) is a commuter campus and it
has been from the start."
Kelbaugh also said his plan will help to make North Cam-
pus seem less spread out to visitors. He added that the area
is scaled for automobiles and not pedestrians, making the
campus seemingly boring and empty for those walking
around it.
Because of the placement of North Campus roads, traf-
fic is also a problem addressed in his plan, as it calls for
more available parking as well as a pedestrian-friendly
environment.
"It's not even a good place to drive, much less walk," he
said. "We need more destinations. We need places to have a
date, places to have a drink.... We need a little more sin."
Hank Baier, associate vice president for facilities and
operations, said Kelbaugh's vision will be taken into account
during future projects. The vision already takes into account
several already-planned projects, including an expansion of
the College of Engineering.
"I think the dean presented a lot of vision that really made
me consider how North Campus will be developing in the
future," Baier said.

Yds Avg Lg TDO
S 35 10.9 45 0

Solo
7
6
5
4
4
4
Yds
0
42
0
0

Asst
4
2
2
2
2

Tot
11
8
7
6
6
5

PASS DEFENSE
Player
Mayer
Gardner
Scott
Haynes

Int
2
1
1
0

Lng
0
42
0
0

Brk-up TD
2 0
3 O
4 O
3 0

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