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October 11, 2002 - Image 17

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9

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10B - The Michigan Daily - FOOTBALL SATURDAY - October 12, 2002
Delta Upsilon becomes first campus dry fraternity

The Michigan Daily - FOOTBAI

OLD MAN'S STILL GOT IT
Even at age 75, Joe Paterno's still the life of the party

2002 Penn

By Dave Szostek
For the Daily
Delta Upsilon became the only
current fraternity on campus with a
nationally mandated alcohol-free
policy to obtain full-member status
with the University's Interfraternity
Councilt. By an unanimous vote,
the 28-member DU was voted in as
an active member of the IFC - a
move that allows DU to lead the
way toward a new trend in the Uni-
versity's fraternities: alcohol-free.
"I can feel confident in saying that
within the next five to 10 years the
majority of our fraternities on campus
will be alcohol free," said IFC Presi-
dent Joel Winston, an LSA senior.
"In our social events, we are
starting to see that the houses that
are making the effort to start plan-
ning social events outside of the
fraternity house are being more
successful because people are
enjoying those more than the typi-
cal fraternity party with the warm
beer, and the dance floor and the
'Baby Got Back' playing in the
background. People are tired of that
- they've done that," Winston said.
"We represent the new era of fra-
ternity life on campus - not for
better or worse, inferior or superior -
but simply a new tradition built on
brotherhood, philanthropy events as well
as social events," DU President Bran-
don Phenix said.
Philanthropy interests include
setting up a boys and girls club
connection, adopting a highway,
collecting pop-can tabs for the

Ronald McDonald house and erect-
ing a field goal in their front yard
to be used for a charity field goal
kicking event during Homecoming.
They are in the process of erect-
ing their second field goal; the first
one was vandalized. Aside from
their philanthropies, however, DU is
also involved in ongoing social
events.
One sorority president Maggie
Weston, who requested that the
name of her sorority remain anony-
mous, explained that it was great
that DU invited every sorority for a
game of dodge ball on DU's front
lawn during the midst of rush, as it
let all of the girls relax, have fun
and see friends from other sorori-
ties. Over 150 sorority women
attended.
"We made them all T-shirts, we
gave them hot dogs, food and pop.
And they were here for a couple
hours as a break during their rush,"
said Phenix, an Education senior.
Although DU's social events do
not include alcohol, a mainstay of
fraternity-sorority relations in the
past, DU's individual members are
not restricted from drinking.
"We're not touting alcohol as
some type of evil. What we're say-
ing is that we don't need it in our
house," Phenix said. "For the guys
who like to go out and have fun -
they do that. They visit other frater-
nities who have been really cordial,
or they can go to the club - wher-
ever they want to go. We have
brothers who are not interested in
that scene, and we'll just stay here

and play poker on a Friday night."
But there are consequences for
breaking the alcohol policy.
"Anyone who is stupid enough to
bring alcohol to our house is auto-
matically fined $100 and they come
before our executive board. The
chances of them sticking around is
slim to none," Phenix said. "We
really make a point to stick to (our
values)."
Others members of the Greek
community agree that DU main-
tains its values.
"These are a wonderful group of
guys and I have no doubt that they
will be successful just because of
the type of guys that they are. They
don't need alcohol and they don't
focus on the fact that they don't
have alcohol," Winston said.
Weston, an LSA junior, added,
"There are fraternities and there are
frats ... and DU lives up to all their
fraternity values and ethics daily."
Another part of DU's values is
the process in which they extend
bids for membership.
"Guys' rush is nowhere near as
formal as the girls.' We can extend
bids whenever we feel like it. We're
going to keep extending bids proba-
bly all year," Phenix said. "We are
always looking for new guys."
DU's pledging process also sets
new standards. "We don't lock guys
behind doors and ask them to do
things," Phenix said. "We have
events where guys will be doing
house chores, but that is only with
brothers working right beside
them."

JONATHON TRIEST/Daily
Following a nationally mandated alcohol-free policy, members of Delta Upsilon
socialize at their house at 1331 Hill St.

"Our events are not meant to
intimidate and not meant to haze.
They are meant to build brother-
hood and cohesion within our
brotherhood," he added.
It is that brotherhood, cohesion,
interest in philanthropy, atypical
social events and an absence of
alcohol that sets the new trend for
fraternities.
"I'd like to think in DU we are build-
ing Renaissance Men," Phenix said.
"These guys are changing things
up. I am excited for them," Winston
said.
"For me, I will know when our
fraternities here at (the) University

of Michigan have hit the ideal point
- when you walk into a fraternity
and it looks like a sorority house,"
Winston added.
Weston also praised the condition
of DU's house.
"I've never understood the attrac-
tion for guys to live in a house that
is disgusting and dirty. (DU's)
house is beautiful."
"(Alcohol-free) is the general
trend - it's where we're heading. A
lot of people are afraid to deal with
it, but I don't think a lot of the lead-
ers and the presidents that I deal
with are afraid to face it," Winston
said.

RHA changes stance, will
support hail smoking ban

ne symbolic interaction between
legendary coach Joe Paterno and
an unassuming college student
this summer typified the 75-year-old's
mentality about being the winningest
college football coach of alltime.
After sitting through Big Ten meet-
ings at a Downtown Chicago hotel,
Paterno sneaked out early -like only
he could - and caught a breather.
A young woman was waiting for her
ride and started small talking with the
legend, unaware of who the man with
big googly glasses was.
"Are you with the Big Ten?" she
asked.
"YeahI'm from State College,"Pater-
no said. "Just waiting for some friends."
The two conversed for nearly 10 min-
utes, discussing the weather, the city,
their families - everything but football.
But that's just the way Paterno is.
Never wanting to bring attention to
himself or toot his own horn, he would
almost prefer that people consider him
a teacher than a Hall of Famer.
And while it may surprise some that
Paterno is a fan of the opera and classi-
cal literature - and is still always the
"life of the party" at social functions -
it isn't a shock that he has his Nittany
Lions in the Big Ten title hunt.
With the Michigan-Penn State rivalry
taking a two-year hiatus due to a revolv-
ing schedule, Paterno may retire before
the next matchup.
At least, that depends on who you ask.
"Hey I may be getting old, but I have
a heck of a staff," said Paterno. "Maybe
things go by me that didn't used to go
by me. I don't know."
But his son, Jay Paterno, says the old
man hasn't lost a step and won't be
leaving anytime soon.
"He's got three years left on his con-
tract, but I guess he'll probably try to
push it to five after this year," said Jay,
who is also Penn State's quarterbacks
coach. "But then again, he's been saying
that for 20 years, and I don't think any-
thing can drive him away.
"He doesn't golf, he doesn't hunt, he
doesn't fish or anything like that. He
may read Socrates or the Latin version
of Aeneid, but he still has a great pas-
sion for the game -it's what he does."
But it wasn't too long ago that critics
were calling for Paterno's head, saying
he "was losing it," and "wasn't chang-
ing enough with the times."
After last season's inauspicious 1-4
start, the Nittany Lions were being
questioned over their talents, their
hearts and their pride.
Then Paterno pulled them together
with one of his famous quotes he often
uses from the library of books he's read.
"If nobody told you how good you
were, how good would you be."
Jay said it inspired and challenged the
Nittany Lions, and nothing at Penn State
has been the same since - even Joe.
"He just seems like he still has a lot of
fire in him, and I was just saying yester-
day that it just seems like he's different,"
said defensive tackle Anthony Adams.
"Last season, they might have said he
was over the hill. But if you saw the
Iowa game when coach Paterno ran that
4.4 at those refs, you could sense in his

No. Name
1 Anwar Phillips
2 Deryck Toles
3 Chris Ganter
4 Robbie Gould
5 Larry Johnson
7 Zack Mills
8 Jesse Neumyer
9 Terrence Phillips
10 Calvin Lowry
11 Tony Johnson
12 Michael Robinson
13 Kinta Palmer
14 David Royer
14 Reginald Walker
15 Yaacov Yisrael
16 Andy Ryland
17 Lavon Chisley
18 Andrew Gunman
19 TomLundquist
19 Gerald Smith
20 Marcus Mills
21 Alan Zemaitis
22 Pete Gilmore
23 Aric Heffelfinger
23 Shawn Mayer
24 Bryant Johnson
25 Richard Gardner
25 Matt Huet
26 Matt Gasparato
27 Chris Harrell
28 Mike Baird
28 James Millon
29 Paul Cronin
29 Ryan Pinckney1
30 Ryan Caputo
30 Eric Dare
31 Ernie Terrell
32 Bryan Scott
33 Mike Lukac
34 Gio Vendemia
35 John Royse
36 Brian Fairchild1
37 Lamar Stewarts
38 Jimi Mitchell t
39 Paul Jefferson
39 Woody Scmidt
40 T.C.Cosby
41 Scott Paxon
42 Sean McHugh f

Pos
WR
OLB
QB
PK
TB
QB
S
WR
S
WR
QB
WR
P
RB
S
ILB
DE
S
QB
WR
CB
CB
TB
RB
S
WR
CB
PK
TB
S
WR
CB
S
LB
TE
CB
WR
CB
TE
CB
CB
FB
OLB
OLB
FB
P
OLB
OLB
FB

.3

Ht.
6-1
6-0
6-1
6-0

Wt.
180
216
197
168

i

6-2 222
6-2 215
6-0 209
6-0 187
6-0 195
5-11 206
6-3 228
6-4 182
&3 205
5-9 180
5-11195
&1 237
6-5 262
6-3 208
6-2 213
510 179
5-11158
6-2 197
5-10209
6-2 209
6-0 198
6-2 210
5-11187
6-2 183
5-11205
6-2 205
6-2 194
5-10195
6-2 212
5-10 217
6-4 266
5-9 187
6-3 198
6-2 215
6-2 246
6-0 189
5-9 180
5-11 223
6-1 229
6-2 213
6-1 258.
6-3 196
6-0 225
6-5 261
6-5 264

FILE PHOTO
In his 53rd year at Penn State, legendary coach Joe Paterno still keeps the refs on
their toes.

By Erin Saylor
Daily Staff Reporter

The Resident Halls Association announced a change in
their position on smoking in residence halls last night dur-
ing their first official meeting of the year in East Quad
Residence Hall. RHA members resolved to present a non-
smoking stance to University Housing, which could affect
students as early as next fall.
In January, RHA asked its hall councils to poll resi-
dents' views on smoking in resident halls and report to the
organization.
Housing officials had approached RHA members to submit
an opinion for or against a smoking ban in residence halls.
They had cited health, safety and damage to University
property as their main reasons for banning smoking. Nine out
of 11 Big Ten schools had banned smoking in their residence
halls at the time of the vote. In a vote on the resolution, 11 out
of 18 RHA representatives voted in support of the proposal
- a clear majority.
But RHA had previously decided that a two-thirds majority
would be needed to pass the resolution, and so the proposal
was vetoed.
After reviewing their bylaws this summer, the RHA is
changing that position to more accurately represent what
they feel is the sentiment of a majority of the student body.
"We went with a two-thirds majority because at the time,
it seemed like a change in our constitution," said RHA Pres-
ident Tim Winslow, an Engineering senior. "Now, we feel
that it was not the best decision."
Though RHA has a say in the decision, the final policy

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"In the next month or so,
University Housing is planning to
go smoke-free in the residence
halls"
- Tim Winslow
Resident Halls Association President
will be determined by University Housing and could be in
place by next school year.
"In the next month or so, University Housing is plan-
ning to go smoke-free in the residence halls," Winslow
said.
"Technically, over 50 percent of residents did support
going smoke-free and University Housing feels that this
is enough support to go ahead and do this."
Some residents of East Quad were unhappy with the pos-
sibility of smoke-free resident housing, feeling that in an
attempt to promote an image of healthier living, the Univer-
sity is violating student rights.
"Because it's not illegal and because I'm paying for hous-
ing, I don't see why I shouldn't be able to smoke in my room,"
said Joe Galante, a sophomore in the School of Natural
Resources who lives in a smoking hall in East Quad.
"Smoking is a part of the lifestyle you live, and if you're
going to be living in the dorms for a year, you should be com-
fortable," Galante added.

eyes that he's ready to get it done."
Paterno's blazing speed in running
down a ref definitely caught some eyes.
"Joe looked pretty good on that
sprint," said Michigan coach Lloyd Carr.
"I just hope to be living at that age."
But his athleticism and vigor was
nothing new to Penn State players -
former or current - because Paterno
has always seemed to immerse himself
in his practices. Whether that's showing
a center how to snap, or a cornerback
how to bump a wide receiver, Paterno's
everywhere on the practice field.
"We used to marvel at how much
energy he had," said former Penn State
wide receiver Eddie Drummond.
Paterno usually doesn't wear a head-
set on gamedays or call upstairs to the
booth. But Jay said it always seems like
his father has a masterful control over
his team, and that Paterno can see things
on the field that not many others can.
"He's one of those guys who could
coach every single position," Jay said.
And his players feel he can instruct
them on every aspect of their lives.
"One of the best things about coach
Paterno is that he seems to know every-
thing about everything," Drummond
said. "He just doesn't teach you foot-
ball, he teaches you about life."
Jay said that deep down his father
considers himself a teacher. But he said
what people don't know is that Paterno
is constantly evolving and learning. He
has to, if he wants to continue to relate
to his players, who are more than a half
century younger than him.
"He's always has a pulse with how to
stay in touch with the kids," Jay said.
"And when he motivates his players, he
tries to get inside kids' heads."

But Paterno still doesn't find himself
that different from today's college kids
in one special category - partying.
"His image is a plain, vanilla conser-
vative guy," Jay said. "But he loves a
party, and he's always the first one on
the dance floor and the last to leave."
Just ask other Big Ten coaches.
When Paterno goes to conferences with
his often-younger peers, Paterno's defi-
nitely the last one to hit the sack.
"Minnesota coach Glen Mason told
me, 'Half of us want to go to bed and
Joe's still out there dancing."' Jay said.
Dishing out snappy one-liners is
another part of Paterno's personality. Jay
swears that his dad, a former English
major from Brown University, could
have easily became a great lawyer.
Jay found that out early on in his life,
as every time the Paterno family had
dinner, Joe always initiated a different
political or historical discussion - and
didn't hesitate to put his two cents in.
"He loved to argue, and he'd always
gang up on me and my brothers or sis-
ters," Jay said. "And once we thought
we had him all figured out, he would
take a totally different view and force
us to argue from another side that we
weren't comfortable with."
And when it came to punishing Jay
or his brothers, Paterno never really
took the "innocent until proven guilty"
stance when using his infamous paddle.
"He would definitely not be a good
police officer," Jay said. "He was
always shoot first, then ask why later.
We'd always be explaining to him what
we did while he was using the paddle."
But Jay doesn't have to worry about
his father turning into a cop; he's
already got a pretty good day job.

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