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September 20, 2001 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-09-20

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 20, 2001

NATION/WORLD

Tenuous Mideast truce
holds despite gun battle

JERUSALEM (AP) - Palestinian police
enforced an informal truce with Israel yesterday,
patrolling hot spots, and both sides agreed to
renew U.S.-hosted talks on resuming security
coordination.
The calm was disrupted by an explosion at a
Jewish settlement that injured two Israelis and a
two-hour gun battle in the West Bank town of
Hebron in which five Palestinians were injured.
Each side accused the other of starting the
exchange of fire, and Israel said it was too early
to tell if the truce was taking hold.
The United States has been prodding Israel
and the Palestinians to work out a cease-fire.
Calm in the Middle East is seen as essential for
Washington's attempt to bring Arab and Mus-
lim states into a coalition that would support
military retaliation for last week's terror
attacks.
In a first step toward cementing a truce, Israel

and the Palestinians agreed that top commanders
would meet to talk about resuming security coor-
dination. Palestinian officials said the meeting
would be held today in Tel Aviv, with U.S. partic-
ipation. Israel said a time and place had not yet
been set.
President Bush said yesterday he has "a sense
of optimism" over informal truce, saying last
week's attacks on the United States may be
prompting the current hopeful actions.
"I felt like this event may shake up the atti-
tudes of the Middle East," the president said from
the Oval Office yesterday. "People are resolving
to show the world there can be peace there, as
well."
In the next stage, Israeli Foreign Minister Shi-
mon Peres would meet with Palestinian leader
Yasser Arafat. The meeting could take place
before the end of the week, said ministry spokes-
woman Yaffa Ben-Ari.

NEWS IN BRIEF
ARUDHEADLINES FROM A EWORLD
NEW YORK ' .
Late rally saves Dow Jones, Nasdaq
The economic fallout from the terrorist attacks sent stocks plummeting for the
second time in three days yesterday, with a late burst of buying saving the Dow
from its worst three-day point loss ever.
The Dow Jones average was down as much as 423 points at mid-afternoon but
recovered somewhat and finished with a loss of 144 points following news
reports that the Pentagon ordered warplanes to begin moving to the Persian Gulf
area, the first concrete sign of preparations to retaliate.
"I think that's what the market needed to see. They wanted to get rid of uncertain-
ty and this helped," said Charles White, portfolio manager at Avatar Associates.
Still, the market remained vulnerable after tens of thousands of job cuts at
Boeing, American Airlines and other companies that have seen their business
crippled by the terrorist attacks.
At its low yesterday, the Dow had a three-day loss of more than 1,100 points.
Its worst three-day loss was 984 points in August 1998.
The Dow closed down 144.27, or 1.6 percent, at 8,759.13. So far this week,
the Dow is down 746.81, or 8.8 percent.
The Nasdaq was down 27.28 at 1,527.80, a 1.8 percent loss, while the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index was off 16.64, or 1.6 percent, at 1,016.10.
NEW YORK
Residents suggest delaying race for mayor
The attack on the World Trade Center has transformed the New York mayor's
race from an election about preserving prosperity and a low crime rate to a
contest focused on which man can best shepherd the city through the crisis.
In fact, some New Yorkers have been so impressed by Republican Mayor
Rudolph Giuliani's resolute leadership since the attack that they don't want to
pick a new mayor at all. They have suggested delaying the election to keep the
outgoing mayor in City Hall for the recovery effort. And Giuliani, whose last
day in office is Dec. 31, has not ruled out the possibility.
The GOP and Democratic primaries had been scheduled for Sept. 11, but
less than three hours after the polls opened, two hijacked airliners toppled the
Trade Center towers, profoundly changing the issues and the tenor of the cam-
paign.
"The most important issue now is building the city's psyche, its morale and
its infrastructure," said Steven Cohen, director of the graduate program in pub-
lic policy at Columbia University. "So people are going to step back and take a
second look at the candidates.

4

West Bank town of Jenin yesterday.

American Airlines to lay off 20,000

The Goff Smith
Lecture, sponsored
by Michigan
Engineering, will be
rescheduled due to a
family emergency.

DALLAS (AP) - The parent com-
pany of American Airlines said yester-
day it would lay off at least 20,000
employees, bringing the industry's job
cuts since last week's terrorist attacks
to about 66,000 as carriers deal with
sharp declines in demand and new
security measures.
The cuts - equal to about 14 per-
cent of AMR Corp.'s work force -
will be spread across American, Trans
World Airlines and the American
Eagle commuter line. The companies
have 138,350 employees.
A short time later, the parent of
United Airlines announced plans for
20,000 job cuts at the nation's No. 2

airline.
American, the world's largest carri-
er, had already said it planned to cut
its flight schedule by 20 percent, as
have other airlines. Executives have
been in Washington this week, lobby-
ing Congress and the Bush adminis-
tration for a multibillion-dollar aid
package.
The aviation industry has been
reeling since terrorists hijacked four
airliners Sept. I1 and crashed them
in New York's World'Trade Center,
the Pentagon and rural Pennsylvania.
The aviation system was closed for
two days and passengers have been
scarce.

US Airways plans to lay off 11,000
employees and Continental 12,000
workers. America West, America
Trans Air, National Airlines and Vir-
gin Atlantic have all announced cuts.
Midway Airlines shut down.
Analysts have said there could be
100,000 layoffs as the industry deals
with a slower economy and problems
related to the attacks.
American Airlines chairman Don-
ald Carty said he was declaring a
"state of emergency" at the carrier.
"This is, without a doubt, the most
difficult thing I have had to do inmy
two decades at American," he said in a
letter to employees.

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DUBLIN, Ireland
IRA offers to renew
disarnament tks
The Irish Republican Army offered
yesterday to renew negotiations with
disarmament officials, increasing
chances that Britain would extend
Northern Ireland's unraveling
Catholic-Protestant government.
-The outlawed IRA said in a state-
ment it would resume talks with
retired Canadian Gen. John de Chaste-
lain, leader of a 4-year-old disarma-
ment commission. The IRA broke off
negotiations last month..
The IRA offered to "intensify the
engagement" with de Chastelain "with
a view to accelerating progress
towards the comprehensive resolution
of this issue."
But as in all of its previous state-
ments on the matter, the IRA offered.
no assurance that it would ever allow
de Chastelain's team to dismantle any
weapons from the IRA's many secret
arms bunkers.
MOSCOW
U.S. student's drug
conviction upheld
Russia's highest court yesterday
upheld the conviction of U.S. student
John Tobin, who served half of a one-
year prison term for marijuana posses-
sion before being freed and returning
home last month. Tobin has denied the
charges and pleadedi innocent at his
trial in the southern city of Voronezh.
Yesterday, Tobin's lawyer Maxim
Bayev appealed the verdict to the

Supreme Court, asking it to throw out
the conviction for lack of evidence. The
court ruled the evidence against Tobin
was solid and the conviction must stand,
court spokesman Nikolai Gastello said.
Russian officials arrested Tobin, a
24-year-old Fulbright scholar, for pos-
session on marijuana in January in
Voronezh, where he was studying at a
university. The case gained wide atten-
tion after the Federal Security Service,
the main successor to the KGB, said he
was believed to be training to be a spy.
BOSTON
Drug helps prevent,
delay kidney failure
A type of drug already widely used
to lower blood pressure can substan-
tially delay and perhaps prevent kidney
failure in diabetics, a discovery that
could eliminate tens of thousands of
new dialysis and transplant cases each
year.
Doctors found that the medicines,
called angiotensin II receptor blockers,
forestall complete kidney failure by
about two years in diabetics with
advanced kidney disease. They predict
the effects will be even more dramatic
in those with less severe kidney dam-
age, potentially protecting them from
ever reaching end-stage disease.
Dr. Barry M. Brenner of Boston's
Brigham and Women's Hospital calcu-
lated that during the three years of his
study, the drugs could have prevented
38,000 cases of kidney failure in the
United States alone if all diabetics
with kidney damage had taken them.
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

4

4

II JJl4I
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