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March 08, 2001 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-03-08

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 8, 2001

NATION/WORLD

Government may pay organ donors

WASHINGTON (AP) - Hoping to encourage
living Americans to donate a kidney or even a sec-
tion of liver, the House voted unanimously yesterday
to help pay donors' travel and other expenses.
It would be the first time government offered a
financial incentive for donation, experts believe.
Living donations doubled during the 1990s as
medical techniques improved and the demand for
organs became more acute, while donations after
death grew very slowly.

"It's a very simple, direct kind of program. If
you're willing to help and you're willing to donate,
we're going to help you," said Rep. Karen Thurman,
(D-Fla.)
The legislation, approved 404-0, with 31 members
absent, also provides for grants to states to try to
increase donations after death.
The debate and vote were in stark contrast to the
last time the House considered the issue of organ
donation, when lawmakers were sharply divided over

how available organs should be distributed.
Most members supported the current system, which
gives preference to patients in the local areas; others
argued that organs should be offered to the sickest
patients first, even if they live outside the area.
That debate is largely on hold for now, and much
of the attention has turned to donation, where there
is more consensus. The legislation approved yester-
day pulled out the noncontroversial aspects of the
1999 House bill.

If you didn't make it to New Orleans
Tomorrow Night March 9th
8:00 PM - 12:00 AM
MICHIGAN UNION
The carnival is a post spring break celebration and part of Little Sibs weekend...It will feature
Games, Casino, Artsbreak, Bingo, Karaoke, 2 shows by Big Time hypnotist: Steve Meade!
Free Food. Come collect all the Mardi Gras beads you can! All events are free...
Student ID required at the door after 9:30 PM.
Sponsored by Michigan Union Arts & Programs, Michigan Union Program Board, RHA, and SORC.

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NEWS IN BRIEF . j
!IEADLINES FROM AROUND THE WVORLD
WASHINGTON
Hispanic population even with blacks
The fast-growing Hispanic population has drawn nearly even with blacks,
according to preliminary Census Bureau estimates that analysts say show an
America more diverse than ever.
Hispanic population growth outpaced predictions by at least 2.5 million in te
2000 census, with much of that increase due to higher-than-expected rates of
immigration, analysts said yesterday.
There were about 35.3 million Hispanics in America last year, an increase of
58 percent from 1990, the preliminary Census Bureau estimates show. The black
population, meanwhile, ranged between 34.7 million and 36.4 million, with the
exact figure uncertain because Americans, for the first time, were allowed to
check off more than one race on the 2000 census form.
"It's a little surprising. But still, we've known the trends for some time," said
Hans Johnson, demographer with the Public Policy Institute of California in San
Francisco. "We know eventually Hispanics will become the largest minority
group in the United States."
Though the figures are from a Census Bureau committee report, they are not
final and may change, cautioned Jorge del Pinal, a senior agency official in
charge of race and ethnicity statistics.
JERUSALEM
Israeli coalition hopes to end bloodshed
Ariel Sharon took over as Israel's prime minister yesterday with a mandate to
end months of bloodshed, and said his broad-based coalition was ready to make
peace with the Palestinians if they "abandon the way of violence, terrorisman
S haron, the nation's fifth prime minister in six years, heads a large and
unwieldy government that inherits the Palestinian uprising, a broken-down peace
process and an anxiety-ridden Israel.
In a speech to the Knesset, Sharon said his coalition would be ready for
"painful compromises" toward peace with the Palestinians, but not "under the
pressure of violence and terror."
Later, parliament approved Sharon's "national unity government" by a vote of
72 to 21. Immediately afterward, Sharon rose to the podium and declared his
allegiance, officially taking office to an unusual round of applause from the floor.
In his speech before the vote, Sharon promised his government would work
with the Palestinians. "If the Palestinians choose the path of peace ... they w
find me and my government a sincere and true partner," he said.

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WASHINGTON
Congress repeals
ergonomic rules
Congress voted yesterday to
repeal new workplace rules aimed
at curbing repetitive motion
injuries, the first legislative accom-
plishment for business-friendly
Republicans who won control of
the White .House and Congress last
year.
The measure cleared the House
on a largely party line vote of 223-
206, less than 24 hours after Senate
passage. Democrats and organized
labor protested v.ociferously, but
President Bush has signaled he will
sign it.
"There's a sure way to make all
the injuries. go away, and that's to
make all the jobs go away," said
Rep. Anne Northup of Kentucky,
one of numerous Republicans who
argued that the rules would impose
prohibitive compliance costs on
business.
DEBELDE, Yugoslavia
U.S. peacekeepers
wound 2 Albanians
U.S. peacekeepers in Kosovo -
working to cut off supplies to
rebels in Macedonia - wounded
two ethnic Albanian insurgents yes-
terday, fueling tension along the
border where clashes threaten to
ignite another Balkan war.
Nearby, in southern Serbia's Presevo
Valley, three Yugoslav soldiers were
killed yesterday when their vehicle hit

a land mine. The soldiers were travel-
ing outside the village of Oreovica, on
the edge of a three-mile-wide buffer
zone between Kosovo ano tie rest or
Serbia.
Less than two years after interna-
tional peacekeepers moved into Koso-
vo, rising separatist tensions at the
borders have sparked fears of anot
round of large-scale fighting. The
overwhelmingly Albanian province is
technically part of Serbia, the domi-
nant Yugoslav republic.
WASHINGTON
Bush argues *ast
North Korea eal
President Bush took a hard li
against North Korea yesterday,r
ing out an immediate resumption of
Clinton-era negotiations between the
United States and the communist
government in Pyongyang and urg-
ing South Korea's president to be
skeptical of his neighbor.
Bush praised President Kim Dae-
jung. a Nobel Peace Prize winner
for reaching out to North Korea's
leaders, but said any deal in wh@
North Korea agrees to limit its mis-
siles must include verifiable terms
that would prevent cheating.
The most sensitive foreign policy
session of Bush's presidency produced
discussions that Bush and Secretary of
State Colin Powell termed candid and
frank - signals that Bush and Kim
Dae-jung took differing approaches
toward the same goal of a peaceful
Korean peninsula.
- Conpiledfronm Daih' wire reports

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students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S, mail are
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NEWS Nick Bunklay, Managing Editor
EDITORS: David Enders, Lisa Koivu, Caltlin Nish, Jeremy W. Peters
STAFF: Kristen Beaumont. Kay Bhagat. Ted Borden, Anna Clark, Courtney Crimmins, Whitney Elliott, Jen Fish, Samantha Ganey, Jwel
Gopwant, Ahmed Hamid. Lisa Hoffman, Eizabeth Kassab, Andrew 0, Kim, Jane Kull. Tovin Lapan, Hanna LoPatin, Susan Luth, Louie
Meizlrsh, Jacquelyn Nixon, Shannon Pettypiece, John Polley, James Restivo, Stephanie Schonholz, Nika Schulte, Karen Schwartz, Maria
Sprow, Carrie Thorson, Kara Wenzel, Jaimie Winkler.
CALENDAR: Lindsey Alpert
GRAPHICS: Amanda Christianson, Scott Gordon.
EDITORIAL Michael Grass, Nicholas Wooner, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Peter Cunniffe, Manish Ral, Josh Wickerham
STAFF: Ryan Biay.. Sumon Dantiki, Jessica Guerin. Justin Hamilton, Johanna Hanink, Aubrey Henretty, Henry Hyatt, Shabina Khatri
Fadi KiBiawi, Ar Paul, Rahul Saksena. Matthew Schwartz, Lauren Strayer, Waj Syed, Ben Whetsel.
CARTOONISTS: Dane Barnes, Aaron Brink. Chip Cullen, Thomas Kulgurgis.
COLUMNISTS: Emily Achenbaum, Gina Hamadey, David Horn, Chris Kula, Oustin Seibert, Mike Spahn, Amer Zahr.
SPORTS Jon Schwartz, Managing Editor
SENIOR EDITORS: Raphael Goodstein, Michael Kem, Joe Smith, Dan Williams
NIGHT EDITORS: Kristen Fidh, Arun Gopal. Steve Jackson, Jeff Phillips, Ryan C. Moloney, Benjamin Singer.
STAFF: Rohit Shave. Michael Bloom, Chris Burke, Kareem Copeland, David Den Herder, Chris Duprey. Marko Francescutti, Rhonda Gilmer
Richard Haddad, David Horn, Adam Kaplan, Shawn Kemp. Albert Kim, Seth Klempner, Courtney Lewis, J. Brady McCollough, Adam McQsen,
Nathan Linsley, Peter Lund, James Mercier, Stephanie Often, Swapnil Patel, David Roth. Naweed Sikora, Jeb Singer, Jim Weber.
ARTS Ben Goldstein, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Jennifer Fogel, Robyn Melamed
WEEKEND, ETC. EDITORS: Jenni Glenn, Elizabeth Pensler
SUB-EDITORS: Lyle Henretty (Film), Jim Schiff lFine/Performing Arts). Lisa Rait (Books), Jeff Dickerson (TV/New Media), Luke Smith (Music).
STAFF: Charity Atchison, Gautam Baksi, Matthew Barret, Ryan lay, Leslie Boxer, Rob Brode. Christopher Cousino, Katie Den Bleykr,
Kiran Divvela. Gabe Fajurt. Melissa Gollob, Matt Grandstaft. Joshua Gross. Christian Hoard, Erik Johnson, Meredith Keller, Chris Kula,
Jenny Jeltes, Matt Manser, Wilihelmina Mauritz, Sheila McClear, W. Jacarl Melton. Shannon O'Sullivan, Ben Oxenburg, Darren Ringel.
Jamie Schey, Dustin Seibert, Jacquelene Smith, Andy Taylor-Fabe. Rohith Thumati, John Uhl,
PHOTO Louis Brown, Jessica Johnson, E
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: David Katz, Marjorie Marshall
ARTS EDITOR: Abby Rosenbantm
STAFF: Rachel Feierman, Tom Feldkamp. Sam Hollenshead, Jeff Hurvitz, Joye Lee, Tom Ln, Danny Moloshok, Brendan O'Donnell, Brad Quire,
Brandon Sedloff, Khang Tran, Elite White, Alyssa Wood,
ONLINE Kiran Olvvela, Paul Wong, Managing Editors
STAFF: Rachel Berger, Lisa Cencula, Dana M. Goldberg, Sommny Ko, Mark McKinstty Vince Sust.
CONSULTANTS: Toyin Akinmusuru, Mike Bibik. Satadru Pramanik
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