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February 07, 2001 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-02-07

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 7, 2001-7

y4SRAEL
ntinued from Page 1
m cracy and the Israeli people.
aecause they totally want something
Sharon is unable to deliver," said par-
liament member Yael Dayan.
At Barak headquarters, a few
downcast young campaigners softly
sang a line from the national
anthem: "We have not yet given up
'''n his speech to supporters, Barak
MONTH
Continued from Page 1.
ed funding and because the group is
"always doing something to celebrate
African history."
Black Greek Association Presi-
dent Marcus Collins agreed that
black history should be celebrated
everyday but said there should still
a time in the year which draws
.ention to it.
."It is good to have a period of obser-
vance;" Collins said.
The Phi Beta Sigma fraternity, a
member of the BGA, is celebrating
the month with a Valentine's Day
jazz concert at Leonardo Cafe on
North Campus. The event, called
"Cafe Blue," features the Dean
6ore Quintet, a jazz band from
Wtroit, as well as poetry and other
acts.
"We're trying to pay homage to the
people who made jazz such a large
'part of African culture" Collins said.
Joe Snow, president of Phi Beta
Sigma, said he also believes Black
listory Month is an important cele-
'bration.
It's good to have a month to go
-back to our roots. It's good that it's at
beginning of the year because it
he michigan daily
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himself sounded strong and upbeat
even as he conceded defeat.
"The road we chose is the one and
only true path." he said as backers,
some teary-eyed, slowly waved blue-
and-white Israeli flags. "The true path
requires courage ... and it is possible
that the public is not fully ready for the
painful truth. ... The truth will pre-
vail."
Barak said Sharon had proposed a
government that would include Barak's
Labor Party.
lets us think about it for the whole rest
of the year." he said.
le added that February is a time for
black students to "come together."
Others believe the special month is
needed because it gives students a
chance to learn about their history.
The Black Student Union is hold-
ing events throughout the month,
including a dinner and discussion
with students from Pioneer High
School and a film series on Sunday
featuring an interview with Mal-
colm X.
The group is expecting David
Mohammed, a speaker from the
Nation of Islam, to lecture Feb. 22 on
different issues within the black com-
munity.
"In the media and school, black
people are not taught about our histo-
ry. It's not reflected in popular Ameri-
can culture," said BSU President
Sabrina Charles, an LSA senior.
Charles added that this month
should be a chance for people "to go
out into the community."
Black History Month was started
in 1926 as Negro History Week by
Carter Woodson, a Harvard aradu-
ate, when he realized that black his-
tory had not been documented or
studied.

MAYOR
Continued from Page 1
proposed budget cuts will decrease the
effectiveness of city programs.
"We will be able to maintain ser-
vices at the same level," Hieftje said.
"We just have to look for greater effi-
ciencies."
Also discussed Monday night were
the snow removal efforts that the city
has been undertaking.
"As I see it, getting snow off neigh-
borhood streets during snow emergen-
cies is just another way of
demonstrating that neighborhoods
matter." Hieftje said in his address.
"Transportation is the key" he said
yesterday. "What's the point of clear-
ing streets and walkways if no one is
using them? We need to promote more
walking and bicycling - we have to
find better ways to work with the citi-
zenry'
Carlburg said yesterday that snow
removal and transportation are very
important issues that need to be exam-
ined.
"I definitely believe we want to have

a better program that moves snow,
especially for school children and
those using buses," she said.
City officials also responded to
Ilieftje's promise of increased rela-
tions with the University.
"It is a very good thing that they
are trying to work together" 'Coun-
cilwoman Joan Lowenstein (D-Ward
II) said. "The University is a citizen
and it has responsibility to the other
citizens."
Jim Kosteva, director of commu-
nity relations for the University,
said the relationship with the city
has been very good and will contin-
ue to be because of increased com-
munication.
"We find that there are numerous
areas where we can find mutual bene-
fits, he said. "We look forward to see-
ing more as they come up."
In addition to working together this
past winter on the snow removal
effort, the city and the University have
been planning their first joint project,
the Forest Avenue Parking structure
that will be completed this year.
Kosteva said.

REFOR M
Continued from Page 1
lots. But Boyd vehemently denied any
criticism of the system.
"We would reject any suggestion
that the Qualified Voter File is out of
date," she said. "Other than a fw iso-
lated cases, the QVF worked very
well."
The system has eliminated duplicate
voters and is updated on a daily basis.
Boyd said.
QVF is "eliminating tremendous
opportunities for fraud," she said.
Still. Michigan's voting system is
not without problems. Miller is hoping
to announce the members of her blue-
ribbon committee to look into voter
reforms soon. Three of the four
appointees from each legislative cau-
cus have already been submitted.
Boyd said Miller hopes to have pro-
posals ready to be presented to the
Legislature by spring.
Kay Albowicz, communications
director for NASS, said representa-
tives from 44 states came to form a
blueprint for voting reforms in their
states.
"There is a big disparity, some
states already have these things in
place," Albowicz said of the many
points brought up in the conference,
including poll-worker recruitment,
enhancement of absentee ballot
integrity and continuous training of
election officials.
"Michigan is generally regarded as a
well-run election state," Albowicz
said.

One of the biggest problems facing
a massive overhaul of voting systems
is the high cost, but remedies are avail-
able at the state and tderal levels.
If' the Legislature adopts reforms
made by the blue-ribbon committee,
the "state would be required to make
that funding available," Boyd said.
There is also legislation in te
works to provide federal funding 4o
the renewed voting systems. Li"4
week U.S. Sens. Charles Schuier
(D-N.Y.) and Sam Brownback (^R=
Kan.) announced changes made to a'
bill they previously presented in
December.
The bill, known as the Federal EHec-
tion Modernization Act of' 2001,
would establish an independent blue-
ribbon commission to look at voting
reforms and provide S2.5 billion over
five years for the execution of those
re forms.
"Now that the new president atnd
Congress have settled in, it's time,'
Let to work and pass a voting
reform bill so that what happened4t
2000 never happens again;".
Schumer wrote in a statement'
released last week.
"In the information age, surely the
Internet can become to the voting
process what the ATM has become to
personal banking. This legislation wine
help those states that wish to enterthe
information age for their elections,"
Brownback wrote in the same state-
ment.
The senators plan to introduce the.
bill to the Senate in the upcoming
weeks.

ART
Continued from Page 1
her English professor.
"The show is wonderful because it
not only gives prisoners the opportu-
nity to show their creativity to the
public, but it also allows the public to
see the absolutely wonderful work
that can come out of prisons," she
said.
"I have about 230 pieces of' art that
were all done in that little six by nine
foot cell." former prisoner and
exhibitor Eric McWethy said. "Every
Monday I looked forward to going in
and being able to express myself in a

newfound way.
"I lowever, it is an honor to be here
today, able to express myself verbally
instead of visually." he added.
Tony James, another fonner prisoner
and artist, said the show is beneficial for
the community.
"I really appreciate the work that goes
on here. The curators are up against
great odds and prejudices from Lansing
and prison administrators," James said.
"This show helps eradicate precon-
ceived ideas the public has about prison-
ers. Bein in it served to confirm my
sense as an artist.
The event runs at the Rackham Gal-
leries now until Feb. 21.

I - I

LAWSUIT
Continued from Page 1
that she was "lucky to be here" at orien-
tation, and she said that set the tone for
her college experience.
For more than an hour. Escobar
spoke on how she lied to Amherst
students about her background so
she would not confirm stereotypes
and how humiliated she felt when a

friend saw her neighborhood and
later told her hallmates how "shock,
ing" it was.
"That Amherst world," she said.Zl
thought that was my future aiqdj
would just have to get used to it."'_
Escobar added that although e
didn't have a perfect grade-point
average, what she earned "repre-
sented progress to me and hard
work."

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