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November 15, 2000 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-11-15

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2 - The Michigan Daily -- Wednesday, November 15, 2000

N ATION! WORLD-

I

REGENTS
Continued from Page 1
.doctor of, Scienice, ad J.ohniTislh-
mlan. CI;{() of-'I sh nan Reality anid
l'onstruction, for ia doctor of'cngi-
uacering degree.
Other items on the regents
iagenda include it number of con-
structioni projects.
herregents will consider giving
aluthorization to appoint an aci
arh-c for the building of' the new
Science Instruction ( enter, part of'
the 1.i11e ScIences Inlst it ole, which
is being conIstrutcted ,along Wa)Sht-
enaw Avenuec across Ironi PIliner
Field. The regents approved the
Ccnter during their September
meeting.
There will also be aj proposal
presented to build at facility for
thc Michigan women's gymnastic

tlarnria r the Varsity '[cnn is
('enter on South State Street past
the University (iol F Course.
Another proposal on the agenda
is aii agrecenlent o f cooperatOin
between the University and M ich-
ig~an State University to (d0 a
resea rech proj eet called "FIail Iy
St udy of' Neuiropsycho logn~iealIfrisk
for- Alcohol ismi'
Tomorrow's mieetinig coincides
with the first heari ri r,1 of the lawsuit
challIen g ing the ('olleac of Lit1era-
ture, Scienices and the Arts' use of
race as a (actor in admiissionis.
White said she is coricerned
A bout the local e Ifc is of'thle law-
suit.
"We have to make sure- the atnio-
sphere ai the University is Conl-
geri ia and enriching recgard less
of how thle case conies out,", she
salid.

LAWSUIT
Continued from Page 1
said race is used as a factor in
admissions to achieve diversity buit
is just one oif many factors used in
evaluating candidates. Other factors
include residency, letters of recoin-
nienidations, transcripts arid standard-
I ed test scores.
"1 know of no law school which has
been able to dece-e anything like the
racial diversity wc have here. As of
today, no other cffort has been sue-
cessfjil," Lehimian said.
Close to home
When tie hearinrg beginis tomorrow,
miany studeiits plan to be in atten-
dance as they try to persuade Duggani
to niove the trial to Ann Arbor.
Although the judge is set to
announce wheii and where the trials
will be held, the student irtervenors
are concerned that the trial proceed-
inigs may comiriince in Detroit at the
beginning of Dcecmber, making it dif-
ficult fIM stuidents to attend because of
distance arnd final exams.
Racklin student Jessica ('urtin said
Duggani is sending a negative message
to students if' he decides to hold the
trials in Detroit.
"Regard less of h1is stated inteitions,
if .udge DIuggaii makes the trials when
students can 't attend, lae implies lie
has alr-eady niade a decision,", said
'urtini, one of' the inter'venors in the
L aw School case.
Shanta D~river, another intervenor in
the Law School case, said it is impera-
live fur students to attend.
'.ludge Duggaii's decision is a very
dangerouls decision and the University
should take a str-ong stand against it.
Access has virtually been denied to the
students arid student access to these
cases is essential," Driver said.
Ina April. U.S. D~istrict Judge Ber-
niar-d riedmnan held a pi-etrial hearing
fur the L aw School case in Anni Arbor.

Thie visitor's gallery filled to capacity
arid Friedmni al lowved miore people to
enter the courtr-oomi, seating them in
the jur-y box.
Barry said that while she would like
to have the trials in Ann Arbor so they
are more accessible to all menibers
of' the University, there is rno way to
anticipate what the judge will decide.
. Student participation has been
extremely irmportant. It has demniir-
strated what these cases mieani, but
we'r'e just going to have to wait for tlie
judge's decision,," Barry said.
Ready for action
Barry said that whlenever Duggan
dlecides the trial will be held, the Urii-
versity will be ready.
"We're ready to go to trial when-
ever the judge says it will start," Barry
saidl. "We el very con fiderit aboult
the mricits of the ease legally and also
as factual mtter''
While it has taken years foritie cases
to get to court, Barry said shie thinks
the cases will be decided quickly.
Barry said that there have been other
cases at other universities cial lenging
the urse of race as a Iacetor in admiis-
sioris but the eases at this University
are (differ-enit because of defcnse tac-
ties.
One definiiig characteristic of- the
University's (defense is the use of
previously uniused eripirical cvi-
dence and rceai-clistudfies. The Urii-
vcrsity contends tlhey will be key to
the defenise, whiIc (CI R lawyers have
said they clutter the case arid skirt
the constitutional qurestions at issuec
in the case.
"What 's unique arid imvportanit (about
the case) is that the Univem-sity has
chosen to defenid it so compi-elieii-
sively," Barry said.
The Law School case is scheduled
to go to trial in January. If sunmriny
Judgment is not gralnted to either side,
the LSA case could go to trial as early
as December.

Retarded man faces lethal injection
LIVIN( STON, Texas C ondemnred mrur-der-er Johnny Paul Penry speaks slowly,
stammienrig at ti~iies as lie sear-ches fir words.
"I don't understand. I just know they're going to kill rue," said the niari described by his
lawyers as hating an IQ of 50 to 60 arid the reasoning capacity of a 7-year-old.
After 21 years inippisori, two comrpetenicy trials, two n1iu-der trials arid a U.S. Suprar
(Courtrling on the mentally retarded arid the death penalty, Penry fees execution by injec-
lion tomlorrow night for raping a womian and stabbing her to death in 1 979.
Ihe lexas Board ofUPardoris arid Paroles yesterday denied Pcnry's request for a 30-day
reprieve and a commniutation to a lesser sentence. (Goy.(George W. B~ushi's only option now
is to grant a onie-timie, 30-day reprieve for Penny to pursue fiuliher appeals, but lie will not
(lecide until al coon appeals have beein exhausted, said his spolkeswomian, .I nida Edwards.
Pcriry 's lawyers say he is retarded. Proseutors say lie is ignorant but not retarded.
The impending execcution has drawn protests fi-omi Amnesty International, other death
penalty opponents and the European Union.
If Pcniy and twvo oilier irimuates schedlukl to (die ahead of him ar-e executed this week, lie
would be the 38th killer put to death this year iii Icxias, topping the state's record of 37 in
1997 arid the miost lbr any state iii one year since the U.S. Supreni Court allowed rcinstat
nierit of capital purnishment in 1976.
'xas hers at least three miore executions set for next miorith.

November 16th is your last chance to receive 1000 points
for use on FORIUM, CP& P's on-line recruitment system.
itegister on-line: littp..://1oi-iiieppt.disai.uieh.cdti/fiortlt.htniI
Log in with your uni(Iname and lTD Password-TrODAY
Students registering prior to November t 6'-mill receive 1000 points to bid on
inltrviews. Those registering after Novemrber 16 will only receive 800 points.
Career Planning & Placement "'bwww.cpp.umich.edu t 764-7460

Thle UnIiversity tt M iiugan
Career Planning
Division of Student Allmrs'

Placemnent

ISLAM AWARENESS WEEK
NOVEMBER 13m-17, 2000

Airlines given more
time to negotiate suit
MIINNEAPOL IS The federal
antitruEst trial inivol vinrg Northiwest Air-
lines arid (Continrental Airlines has been
delayed unitilI tomorrow as the parties
continute negnotiationis on3 Continental 's
repur-ehase of its shares awnied by
Northiwest.
The car-riers' announced aii agree-
mienit in principle oii Nov. 6 aiid are
working out final details in an ef'fort to
settle the lawsuit.
Under the tentative (deal, Northwest
would reduce its 55 pen'cent votingm
stake ini Conitiniental to 7 pce-cent,
exchanging its Class A Continental
shares that carry I10 votes per shiare
for 5450 million in cash and a lesser
number' of' Continental B shares that
carry one vote per share.
In addition, Northwest would get
prefr-ed stock ini (Continental that
would allow it to retain the right to
veto pr'oposed comb inat ion bctween
C onitinental and oilier carriers Under
soni ceond~itions.
Violence erupts in
Egypt after elections
FI -AMAR, I gYpt Police fired live~
ariirnit iion and pummeled opposition
suppoien-s with batons and tear gas in
clashes yestei-day that left five people
dlead and 40) inijur-ed durri1t1 the final
rotunrd of' parhiameritary voltinrg.
Inl the Nile Delta villag~e if EI-Amar.
20) rmiles north of air-o, fighting erupted
wvliei supporiter-s of' an inidepend~enit can-
dlidate bi-oke down the (loonrs of' pollinig
stations after they wern-rot allowed to
eter to vote. according to residents arid
police speaking oii conitiono faiioiiyn-
itv.
F~ounr pophe wer-e killed and~ five
inuruned then-ce. II unid-eds of' voter-s in
Shutbra 1I-1 Khncinna, in nonthern Cairo.
also clashed with police vester-day whaem
polls did not open on tinmne.
Police, sonik on hiorseback. fined into
the crowd atten- attacking the pr-otester-s
with batons anidl (ogs and usingy tear- gas.
[ hat clash lef't one dleadl and 35 people
including childr'eni-injured.
Police also blocked polling stations
and~ firecd tear (Tas at would-be voters

Northwest had pur-chased its con-
tn-ohhinn1 stake in I boston-based Conti-
nienital in 1 998.
Northwest has said the control
enisur-ed the Futur-e of' a domiestic alli-
anice between i lie two carriers. '[ilie
To cn nnicnl (arguedI that. NoI'thiwest'-
holding could sqoee eConisumer.
Sorsn sel i c earid stifle comliptitioii.
Radiowave crunch
threatens air travel
WAS[ I INGTFON --1 lie radio airwave
that pilots and air traffic conitr'ollers Lise to
eoiiinutnnicatc are nearly filled to capacity.
accordling to F-ederal Aviation Adiinistra-
tioni, airline and union officials.
'[le lack of radio firequencies is quick[
becorinig as iniportant a factor' in itviatio
congestin as the lack of runways.
Moreover. technological advances to
incerease the systemi's ability to handle more
Coniiniiunications arc not expected to coinsi
sooni enough to pr'evenit the evenl greanter
chinich of dlelays and canicellatiomis that will
occur when alh of the FAA's nadio fi'quen-
cies are beinil used to the miaxinumn extent
possibIle
in the southern Cai-o 'disti ict of Maan di.
lIn havanidiya. another distinct souith of
('airo, police dletainied 75 people f«or ehec-
iomi-relhated d isturbanices, accor-dinhg to
thre police officials.
"is this the doleiiiacy that (Preside
Ihosni) Nliban-ak is callinio fbrn" asks~
IKanial Kannii. who said lie was pi'evented
fi-nv enter~ig a polling stationi in Maadi.
Israel imposes
retaliatory blockade
.1 RUSA\I I-NIIsn'ael imposed a
strinigemit blockade around Palestinian
comniioni ties yesterdlay in response to
the deadly drive-by shiootinigs of' sra*
lis. paralyzing nor'nnal life but falling~
to halt violence.
An least thir-e Palestinians wer-e ki lled
inl the West Bank arid(Gaza Strip.
The killin-zs of four Israelis oii
Monday was part of a new "death oii
the n'oads" tern'or camlpaig~n by Pales-
tniam niihitanits, Israel said. Palestinian
leaden-s harshly conidenrined thle arniy
cordlon ar-ound( the territories they Con-
( 'ulnpiled.ti-oni I)Yilr il) repjorts~

Wednesday
Nov. 15, 7-9pm

Crime (' Punishment
Panel Discussion at 1200 Chem

Thursday TV C& its Effects on Society
Nov. 16,79p Panel Discussion at 150 Law Quad
Frida 7123p Take a tour of your local Ann Arbror Mosqu e
Nov.17123p rides leaving from the cube
Daily Events Monday-Thursday, I Oam-5pm:
"*Union Basement: Information Table, Islamic Jeopardy & Henna
*Information Tent on the Diag serving free hot chocolate & pop

www.umich.edu/-muslims
For more information contact:
As'ad Tarsin, tarsina@umich.edu
-Nora Mahmoud, nfm@umich.edu

Co-Sponsored by: Islamic Education Society, Michigan Student Assembhy, LSA Student
Government, Black Student Union, M-FLICK, Law StIndents for Affirmative Action, Ambatana
Multicultural Council, Couzens Active Minority Ethnic Organization, Students of Color of Rackham,
SAPC, SAMI, Soc. Dept, SAPAC, CEW, Rackha m, A'subuhi Multicultural Council

_ _
E

What Do
These Leaders Have
in Common?

The [University of Michigan
College of P~harmacy has been
developing leaders for positions in
health care, biotechnology, business,

Giwendolyn Chivers, Chief Gayle Crick, Manager,
Pharmacist, University of Michigan Global Marketing,
Health Services Eli Lilly & Co.

Cynthia Kirman, Manager,
National Managed Pharmacy
Program, General Motors Corp.

education, engineering,
law, the pharmaceutical
industry, and other
careers for 125 years.
It's a major reason
our College is
consistently ranked
among the world's best.
You owe it to
yourself to Find out
about the great,
high-paying career
opportunities available to
U-M College of
Pharmacy graduates.
Visit our Web site at

The '.1rtIjf 0tify (ISSN 0715 967) itblshedl Mont~daytrough Frdadil lnthe tfall jtnd wvttteIrmls by
-4tunetl ,1 fs- nw~e:t y of Mclitganr. Subsc p1tons for alth L rmt. SI .01 nf" tnSeptentls't. vl0U.'mdal are
$1(0_ - ~e It'nt Lia-ma-art a- I lt th Aprtil) s $105. ymstrln, S'poLe-ttlI('t ibt ltf'tAptihtis'-18i0 Oi cowtpuS
0tH tl H iter - e$3:. tIsctf',inats rout l 00 P tPta
Ni tpj i m-.1ta rnhor tof Ttu \-,1 tln iOts t ted-fr-1N-t a 1 r talI I~nle't 'O to;
-\0tii-* Im- Mciaon Datly, -120 M ,'r d S AnAM) t1111(CIntt- 0
tot~biNUTV~~c~iS lj Q 'I44Code 11Ncw >7aDAILY Ait15: 07:StI -I - ftttt0-05
I cI o r lto - atInt j ta the diortoudi "C'tO tt. tbttrlfl t".(t A--t.i^-nt>' -
NEWS Jewel Gopwani, Managing Editor'
EDITORS: Nick Bunley. Michael Grass. Nika Schulte. Jaimhie Winkler
vi, .. t ..atltvSt Nrt t- ta tt a a t; t '. t- t ituth
EDITORIAL Emily Achenbaum, Managing Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Peter Cunniffe. Ryan DePietro, Josh Wickerham. Nicholas Woomer
_ on~ at lurea ' 's - a a aa i ~ st I -aats v- o adt'- as a't:rr
I .... . Ni--: , t'S r . O t r , K -N,t , I t . t~ .t!rS.tt(r tU
SPORTS David Den Herder, Managing Editor,
SENIOR EDITORS: Chris Duprey. Mark Francescutti, Geoff Gagnon. Stephanie Offen
ARTS Gabe Fajuri, Chris Kula, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Ben Goldstein
WEEKEND. ETC. EDITORS: Jenni Glenn. Eiizabeth Pensler
PHOTO Louis Brown, Jessica Johnson, Editii4
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: David K~atz, Marjorie Marshall
ARTS EDITOR: Peter Cornue
a , - at; tirt ian4 Jo l "lai ', ' aar .t u. , t ta- /-n. tliaIF taa , aa Lia Ci q -lis- a
ONLINE Rachel Berger, Paul Wong, Managing Editors
t-l - aa t 7 h . -a-Id K. S VI a- "'a-aa NL u,a-t l I Sust-.
a-,aa r- N.I . 1 .1 1> ta>5-
t ! I I - - - -

f~j~ b m ~L11

Pe'ter Labadic, President,
Williams-Labadic, I.C, a
subsidiary of' Leo Burnett
Communications-

Albert Leung, President,
Phyto-'Technologies, Inc.

Robert Lipper, Vice President,
-Biopharmaceutics R&D,
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.,
Pharmaceutical Research Institute

--~ - 7k 50 v- 17- - - :MV,- 5

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