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September 25, 2000 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2000-09-25

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 25, 2000

NATION/WORLD

THOMPSON
Continued from Page IA
I said it's just about going in there and
racing," Namesnik said.
After a preliminary time of
15:1 1.21, Thompson was not a
favorite to medal, but proved to be up
to the challenge in the finals.
"For Chris to make it to the
Olympics was obviously a goal,"
Namesnik said. "The next goal was
to get into the finals and put himself
into a position to win a medal. To
get that medal was an outside
chance.
"It's a tribute to the hard work he's
put in," Namesnik said.
Thompson, the only current Michi-

'an swimmer coippeting in the 2010
Summer Olytnpics; will be staying in
Australia through the closing cere-
monies. He will come back to Michi-
gan and the swim team early next
week, when it will be business as
usual.
But Thompson will not go unno-
ticed by his teammates as an Olympic
medalist.
"He'll assume a greater leader-
ship role," said Namesnik, who
spent his senior year at Michigan
after winning a silver in the 400-
meter individual medley in the
Barcelona Olympics eight years
ago. "He'll feel a sense of accom-
plishment and obligation to come
back and lead the team."

Learn how the world works...
StHu'{i, n flrsaQI ddnGer many

STUDENTS
Continued from Page IA
On Saturday, the group held its sec-
ond annual Fall Kickoff Picnic at Island
Park.
Chin said the event, which was open
to graduate students and their families,
attracted nearly 400 to the site.
The group is sponsored by the
Rackham administration and Rackham
Student Government.
"Ice breaker" events are planned
throughout the year for graduate stu-
dents to meet each other and realize
they aren't the only ones who don't fit
the typical student profile.
Students can visit the group's Web-
site at wwiiiticm.c'dmchd/socgrads to
find out more about upcoming events
like coffee hours, which will begin
next month, and ice skating outings.
Food For Thought
Vietnam and the Movies
The 1989 Sundance Film
Festival award winning
84 Charlie Mopic depict-
ed a LRRP (Long Range
Reconnaissance Patrol)
team through the lens of
a documentary movie
camera. One Vietnam
Vet grunt initially thought
it was indeed a docu-
mentary.
Gary Lillie & Assoc., Realtors
www.garylillie.com

REBELS
Continued from Page IA
about SDS and activism at Michigan
and nationally as well," Schulman said.
Many students said they were
impressed to actually meet the people
that the documentary featured.
"It is really powerful.to actually see
these people that were so influential in
starting the student protest movements
of the sixties," Public Policy graduate
student Jennifer Pasinosky said.
As the end credits began to roll to
the song, "We Shall Overcome" mem-
bers of the audience joined in, adding
to the already emotionally charged
atmosphere. Closing the night was a
panel discussion involving Garvy,
members of SDS featured in the film
and representatives from politically
active groups on campus.
SDS member Bill Ayers told the
audience that it is harder to find cases
of injustice today compared to blatant
injustices of the past like the Holo-
caust and slavery but they are out there
and must be addressed. He said
activism starts with finding rage about
a issue and then acting upon that rage.
"Rebels With A Cause" will run at
the Michigan Theater and select cities
across the nation later in the fall. Fur-
ther details are available at
narsd.srer'els.coiit.
.tdet s . 7*
your hair is long,
Oct it cut.
615 E. Lierty off State
668 93 9 p n 4m
dnk ri rg a t
7A. 16"r, e M

ACROS s THE NATiON
Oil prices remain unaffected after action
CAMARILLO, Calif. -- Gasoline prices remained steady over the past two
weeks, with no immediate impact from President Clinton's decision to tap 30
million barrels of oil from emergency stockpiles, an analyst said yesterday.
The Lundberg Survey of 10,000 stations nationwide found that the ave
price of all grades, plus taxes, was S1.62 per gallon Friday. It was a tenth e a
cent per gallon lower than prices the survey found two weeks ago, but 28 cent
per gallon higher than for the same period a year ago.
Analyst Trilby Lundberg said yesterday that prices likely wouldn't drop to
1999 levels any time soon.
Clinton's announcement Friday may have had some "psychological effect'
on retail prices, but the oil won't hit the market until next month, Lundber
said.
Rising energy costs are becoming an issue in the presidential campaign a
winter heating bills are expected to be as much as 50 percent higher than Ias
year's. Crude oil is selling for more than $34 per barrel, a 10-year high.
The end of the summer driving season often means lower gasoline prics
demand dips and refineries convert more of their oil to heating fuel. But cost tet
crude oil is keeping gas prices high.
Lundberg said it is hard to predict the price impact of the government's oil
release, especially since weather and other factors play a role in demand.

Lazio, Clinton gee
to ban soft money
NEW YORK -- It's a historic
development in the most-watched
Senate race in the United States:.
Hillary Rodham Clinton and her
Republican opponent, Rep. Rick
Lazio, have banned advertisements
that are funded from outside their
individual campaigns.
The ban applies to so-called "soft-
money" ads.
Soft money refers to unlimited funds
collected by political parties, rather
than the individual candidates. While
hard money contributions, limited to
S2,000 per donor, can be used for ads
that advocate voting for or against a
candidate, soft money can only be used
to advocate an issue, boost a candidate
or attack a candidate, rather than stat-
ing, "Vote for so-and-so."
Yesterday, as both sides jostled to
take credit for the accord, watchdog
groups cheered -- but also expressed
skepticism. "We've never had two can-
didates agree not to spend money that
they could have had," said Larry Makin-

son of the Center for ResponsivdPoli-
tics in Washington, D.C. "I'm surprised.
And like the campaigns themselves, I'm
a little wary that it will stick."
The two campaigns reached a d l
late Saturday that prohibits the p
cal parties endorsing then from airing
TV and radio ads boosting their can-
didates or attacking their opponents.
Ray: President's fate
to come in January
WASHINGTON - Independent
Counsel Robert Ray, said yesterday a
decision on prosecuting President
Clinton for his conduct in the Mon~
Lewinsky scandal will come "
shortly" after Clinton leaves the White
House in .anmmiy
"I think the public would like me to
wrap up this investigation, but that
doesn't mean walk away from the
responsibilities I have," Ray said on
CNN's "Late Edition."
"That decision will be rendered
shortly, very shortly after the preident
leaves office in the best interest 6nf
country, and also not to unfairly tr-
on the new president's administration.

c $1 u5e

AROUND THE WORLD
Police arrest 25 in were seekitgmore suspects.
No military or police personne
Jakarta bombings were arrested, despite specuatona
disaffected elements within the at
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Indone- forces, loyal to former dictator Suhar
sian police announced yesterday they to, might have been responsible.
had arrested 25 people suspected of President Abdurrahman Wahi
carrying out a spate of bombings in installed a new national police chie
the capital and said the next target Saturday, ordering him to take quic
would have been the U.S. Embassy. action to stop the attacks.
The suspects were implicated in
attacks including a blast at the Jakarta Floodin in South
Stock Exchange that killed 15 people,
said Brig. Gen:Dadang Garnida. Asia kils hundrei
One suspect, armed with a grenade,
was detained on his way to attack the CALCUTTA, India - As floodin
U.S. Embassy and a crowded depart- receded, the army worked yesterday t
ment store nearby, the officer said. deliver food and fresh water to mil
U.S. Embassy officials declined to lions marooned in eastern India afte
comment yesterday. The U.S. State six days of rain submerged the oun
Department warned last week that tryside and left an estimated 373 dea
American companies and interests or missing, officials said.
might be targeted by the bombers. Soldiers took hundreds of boas int
Police officials said most detainees the countryside to rescue people fron
were from the northwestern province their rooftops. Their efforts, hampere
of Aceh, wracked by decades of because of downed roads and rail s
bloody fighting between separatist were back in full swing, officials sa.
guerrillas and Indonesian troops. All
were arrested in the capital, and police -- Compiedlfivat Daily wire report.
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