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September 28, 1999 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1999-09-28

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NATION/WORLD
GOP plans to link wages, taxes

The Washington Post
WASHINGTON - With the
Republicans' $792 billion tax bill offi-
cially dead, lawmakers and lobbyists for
business interests are looking to a bill
boosting the minimum wage as their
best vehicle for achieving significant
tax relief this year.
Republicans had previously
promised to provide help to small busi-
nesses most affected by a wage boost,

following the same approach they
adopted in 1996 when they raised the
minimum wage from .4.25 to 55.15 an
hour. Now lawmakers are considering
broader measures, including pension
reform and eliminating the estate tax,
which could transform a relatively
modest bill into a much more ambitious
package.
"Instead of having a spoonful of
sugar to help the medicine down, some

of our members would like a wheelbar-
row of sugar," said Trent Duffy,
spokesperson for House Ways and
Means Committee Chair Bill Archer
(R-Texas). "That's why some of our
members are talking boldly about
attaching major tax relief to the mini-
mum wage increase."
Rep. Gary Condit (D-Calif.), a leader
in the effort to raise the minimum wage
by more than Sl across four years, said

"everyone's throwing everything but the
kitchen sink" into the mix of proposals
under consideration.
"We're looking at targeted tax cuts
that would make small business able to
live with and better accept a minimum
wage increase," Condit said. "We want
to be realistic and not overreach, but if
members are interested in a larger scale
package, we certainly would consider
that"

ADMISSIONS
Continued from Page 1
evaluated in LSA and Law School admissions
processes, which use race as a factor.
University General Counsel Marvin Krislov
will moderate the event.
University spokesperson Julie Peterson said the
purpose of the event is to clarify the current sta-
tus of the lawsuits facing the University and
address developments in the cases that occurred
during spring and summer terms.
"It's a chance to hear from those who are going
to be involved in the cases," Peterson said.
In August the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in
Cincinnati ruled that a group of intervening
defendants must be allowed to join the University
in defense of its practices.
The ruling marks the first time a court has

allowed a group of minority advocates into an
affirmative action case.
Peterson said one of the goals of the event is to
also clear up misconceptions of the University's
admissions system.
Citing results from The Michigan Daily Student
Survey, published in April by the Daily in con-
junction with the Department of Communication
Studies and the Institute for Social Research,
Peterson said "students showed some misunder-
standings regarding the admissions process."
Nearly 51 percent of respondents - in a sam-
ple representing 87 percent of the student popula-
tion - opposed the use of race as a factor in the
admissions process.
One student planning on attending the program
is LSA junior Rory Diamond, a Michigan Student
Assembly representative and president of the
campus chapter of the College Republicans.

"I encourage anyone to attend, but go with a
critical eye," Diamond said, adding that misinfor-
mation can cloud opinions regarding issues such
as affirmative action.
"We think that everyone should be there," said
Luke Massie, a member of the Coalition to
Defend Affirmative Action By Any Means
Necessary.
"We plan to explain the particular legal and
political arguments the intervenors will bring into
the cases," he said.
Regardless of where members of the University
community stand on the issue of affirmative
action, Lehman said that "all members of the
Michigan community should make time to learn
about the current litigation."
The program will be broadcasted live on chan-
nel 22 within the University Cable Network and
on Media One in the greater Ann Arbor area.

AROUND THE |NIATION
Rift grows between Justice Dept., FBI
WASHIN:GTON - Last Tuesday at a House hearing on Puerto Rican clemen-
cy, a draft letter from FBI Director Louis Frech undercut the Justice Department.
On Wednesday, a team of FBI agents told a Senate committee that Justice
Department attorneys had stymied their campaign finance investigation.
On Thursday, at her weekly briefing, Attorney General Janet Reno fielded que-
tions that kept returning to the same unpleasant theme - the unusually hos*
relations between Justice and the FBI.
A healthy tension always animates the relationship between the nation's premier
law enforcement agency and the lawyers who handle their wiretap requests and
decide whether to prosecute their suspects.
But last week seemed different to longtime observers.
"This town seems to be dividing up between supporters of Reno and supporters
of Frech. I think that is unfortunate," said Tim Lynch, a criminal justice expert at
the Washington-based Cato Institute.
For years, there was widespread regard around the country for many of Reno's
decisions on independent counsels, including her repeated requests for special
prosecutors to probe Clinton administration figures that enraged the White Ho
and delighted Republicans. Now, it's almost if those judgments never happened.
the eyes of her most acidic critics, Reno and the lawyers who work for her have
morphed into untrustworthy scoundrels at worst, or incompetent bumblers at best.
New antibiotic may antibiotics" for use against common
but potentially deadly infections, said
fight resistant germs Dr. Jack Remington of Stanford
University. Zyvox "is the first new
SAN FRANCISCO- A drug antibiotic in the world in 35 years."
described as the first entirely new kind
of antibiotic in more than 35 years is Tourists continue t(P
expected to give doctors a freshd .
weapon against germs that are resistant f espite cras
to anything science now has.
The medicine, called Zyvox, appears HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL
to work as well as standard antibiotics PARK, Hawaii - A plane crash on
against garden-variety germs and can Mauna Loa Volcano that killed all 10
also kill those that are resistant to people aboard didn't deter sightseers
everything else, including vancomycin, yesterday from the flights that reveal the
now the drug of last resort for stubborn spectacular --- and dangerous - ele-
infections. ments of Hawaii's beauty.
Researchers presented the results of "I've been waiting for this for a loe
several large studies on the drug time," said Jerry Leo of Brick, N._.
Monday at a conference sponsored by who took an around-the-island flight.
the American Society for "Once we were up there we never
Microbiology. Its maker, Pharmacia & thought of it."
Upjohn, plans to seek approval for Hawaii tourism officials played down
Zyvox from the Food and Drug the repercussions of Saturday's Big
Administration and other regulatory Island Air crash, saying most visitors
agencies around the world by the end of understand that many island activities,
the year. such as flying over volcanoes and water-
"There is a crying need for new falls, are inherently risky.

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'U' opposes use of tax credit

TAX CREDIT
Continued from Page 1.
money could go directly to universi-
ties every year.
"My first choice would be to get
rid of the tuition tax credit, and my
second choice would be something
like this bill," he said.
Wilbanks said the University also
opposes the tax credit.
"We would prefer to have the
WRIT E OR
THE DAILY.
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MAYNARD
ST.

Tuesday
HARIBU
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Thursday
Supermack
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tuition tax credit eliminated," she
said.
"And instead provide an appropri-
ations level that would allow us to
restrain tuition increases."
Despite early bipartisan support
for the bill, Schwarz said he's unsure
whether there are enough votes in
both the House and Senate for pas-
sage.
The bill currently awaits debate in
the Senate Committee on Finance.
RU-486
Continued from Page 1
abortions and medical abortions.
They do not use RU-486, but for the
past six months have been using the
drugs methotrexate with misopros-
tol.
The misoprostol causes the uterus
to contract which is similar to RU-
486. It has been used since the
1960s in chemotherapy, but in this
case it is used in much smaller
dosages to perform a non-surgical
abortion.
Director of Patient Services at
Planned Parenthood Jill Michele said
the drug carries similar side affects to
RU-486. The success rate for these
drugs arc 95 to 97 percent.
When asked on the possible usage
of RU-486 at the clinic, Michele said
"I don't know. It depends on who is
making it and how much it costs. We
will be excited when the drug is
available."

AROUND THE ORLD

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Dance
$1.50 Longneck bottles

Lawyers prepare for
case against Pinochet
LONDON - With supporters and
opponents and Gen. Augusto Pinochet
clamoring outside, lawyers for Spain
laid out their case against the former
Chilean dictator on Monday, saying it
constituted "some of the most serious
allegations of crime ever to come
before English courts."
On the opening day of a long-
delayed extradition hearing, lawyers for
Spain urged the magistrate to consider
not only 34 allegations of torture, but
also the anguish of relatives of the
1,198 people who allegedly disap-
peared during Pinochet's 17-year rule.
"It is our case that the continuing
offense of conspiracy totorture .... has,
as one of its objects, that the fate of
these people would continue to be con-
cealed from families causing severe
mental pain, suffering and demoraliza-
tion,' said Alun Jones, a British lawyer
acting for Spanish prosecutors.
j Pinochet, who did not attend, the
I4

hearing, has been detained in Britain
since his arrest Oct. 16 at a London
hospital. Spanish magistrate Baltasar
Garzon wants to put the 83-year-old
general on trial in Spain.
Peacekeepers calm
hungry looters
DILI, East Timor - Struggling to
keep the situation in East Timor under
control, peacekeepers stopped crowds
of hungry refugees from looting yester-
day, collected weapons from pro-
Indonesian militias and sent
advance team into the territory's
ond-largest city.
But in the first show of defiance
toward the international force, armed
men killed one Western journalist and
attacked two others.
Many Indonesians accuse the for-
eign media of stirring up problems in
East Timor and conspiring with the
United Nations.
- Compiled f'oln Daily wire reo-

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NEWS Jennifer Yachnin, Managing Editor

I I

EDITORS: Nikita EaSlay, Katie Plona. Mike Spahn, Jaimie Winkler.
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PHOTO Louis Brown, Dana Unnane, Editors

to meet th-e many

business

challenges faced by our clients.

COMPANY PRESENTATION
9/29/99, 4:30-6;00pm, Room P1018
ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: David Rochkind
ARTS EDITOR: Jessica Johnson
STAFF: Allison Cantor, Sam Hollenshead. Dhani Jones, Marjorie Marshall, Jeremy Menchik. Joanna Paine. Sara Schenk. Michelle Swelnis, Kir*
ogachi W
ONLINE Satadru Pramanik, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Toyin Akinmusuru. Rachel Berger. Paul Wong
STAFF: Amy Ament, Angela Cummings, Dana Goldberg, James Schiff. Peter Zhou.
DESIGNER:Seth Benson

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