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January 14, 1999 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1999-01-14

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News: 76-DAILY
Display Ads: 764-0554
Classified Ads: 7640557

One hundred eight years ofeditondfreedom

Thursday
January 14, 1999

Ann Aro 'Mcian. 199Te ihgaal

2'M'

football players suspended from team

Lineman and fullback's
suspensions come on
heels of alleged
involvement in fight
fly Michael Grass
fly Staff Reporter
Michigan football coach Lloyd Carr
announced yesterday that football play-
ers Jason Brooks and Ray Jackson have
been suspended for violating team
rules.
"I have suspended Ray Jackson and
Jason Brooks from the University of
Michigan football team,' Carr said in a

written statement. "As this process con-
tinues, their future status will be deter-
mined."
The suspension comes in the wake
of Brooks and Jackson's alleged involv-
ment in a fight outside the Sigma Chi
fraternity house at 548 S. State St. early
Friday morning.
Fraternity members, who asked not
to be identified, told The Michigan
Daily that Brooks, an offensive line-
man, threw a television set from a third-
floor window and attempted to steal a
laptop, Sony PlayStation and portable
phone from the fraternity house.
An altercation later ensued that
involved fraternity members and

Brooks and
Jackson.
Fraternity
members said
Sunday that
Jackson, a fullback,
knocked a Sigma
Chi member
unconscious, send-
ing him to the
University Brooks
Hospitals emer-
gency room with a
fractured cheekbone and nose.
One of the suspects involved told
police after the incident that he was act-
ing in self-defense.

The role of cor-
nerback William
Peterson in the
fight is still
unclear. Sigma Chi
members said
Sunday that all
three players threw
punches and an
LSA first-year stu-
dent, who did not Jaco
want to be identi-
fied, saw Peterson
involved in the altercation.
Peterson said Tuesday he was not
involved in the altercation, but does
admit being on the scene.

Ann Arbor Police Sgt. Michael
Logghe said yesterday that detectives
are still investigating the incident. If
warrants are requested in this case, it
will be a few days before they are
issued.
Douglas Lewis, Peterson's attorney,
could not be reached for comment last
night.
Nicholas Roumel, who has served
as Jason Brooks' legal counsel in the
past, said that since Brooks has not
been charged, he has not contacted him
regarding his suspension.
Brooks has been disciplined pre-
viously under the University's Code
of Student Conduct for sexually

assaulting a female University stu-
dent, the survivor told The Michigan
Daily, adding that Brooks accepted
responsibility for four Code viola-
tions.
The four counts were for physical-
ly harming another person, sexually
assaulting or sexually harassing
another person, illegally possessing,
using, distributing, manufacturing or
selling alcohol or other drugs and vio-
lating state or federal law having a
serious impact on the University com-
munity.
Attempts to reach Carr, Brooks and
Jackson for comment were unsuccess-
ful.

Seeking

answers

Phi Delts charged; Cantor's
death ruled non-criminal

By Nick Bunkley,
Jewel Gopwani
and Jaimle Winkler
Daily Staff Reporters
Ten Phi Delta Theta members named in
warrants on alcohol-related misdemeanor
charges are expected to turn themselves in
to the Ann Arbor Police Department for
arraignment this morning after a Washtenaw
County Court judge
approved the warrants yes-
terday.
"My understanding is that
they are going to come in
tomorrow," AAPD Sgt.
Michael Logghe said yester-
day. "Basically, they come
in, and they're taken over to
the courthouse. In a techni-
cal term, they will be arrest-
ed." Cantor
After authorizing the war-
rants Monday, Washtenaw County Assistant
Prosecuting Attorney Joseph Burke released
conclusions of his investigation into the Oct. 16
death of LSA first-year student Courtney
Cantor.
"There is no credible admissible evidence of
criminality" Burke said yesterday.
Cantor, a Chi Omega pledge, died after
falling from her sixth-floor Mary Markley
Residence Hall window only hours after
leaving a carry-in party at the Phi Delta
Theta fraternity house, wheretshe was seen
drinking.
Cantor's blood-alcohol level was deter-
mined to be .059 percent, lower than the .10
percent level at which persons are legally
intoxicated, and investigators have not yet
determined whether alcohol played a role in
her death.
A written statement by Burke said toxicology
reports ordered by Washtenaw County Medical
Examiner Bader Cassin found traces of a drug
known as "liquid ecstacy" or "lemons" in
Cantor's blood. 4
Although the findings were known at the

time of the original release of the autopsy
report, they were not released until recently
because the investigation was still ongoing,
Logghe said.
"We don't even know that it altered her
behavior at all," Logghe said. "This doesn't
explain anything to us'. We've known this for
months."
Logghe said liquid ecstacy enhances the
effects of alcohol, so less drinking can result in
a higher feeling of intoxication.
"... Courtney's blood contained 41 m1/dI
of the substance gamahtdroxybutyric acid,"
the statement said. "Unfortunately, unless
more information is forthcoming, we will
never know with any degree of certainty
whether the level of GHB found in
Courtney's at the time of her death
occurred naturally, whether she voluntarily
ingested the drug or whether someone put
the drug in her drink without her knowl-
edge."
An unknown witness interviewed in the final
Department of Public Safety report said she
"heard some of the people were using 'lemons'
that night.'
But George Cantor, Courtney's father,
said Tuesday he doesn't believe his daughter
would have taken the drug by her own
choice.
"This is so out of character for anything I
know about Courtney that I have to assume
that it was slipped to her,' George Cantor
said.
The charges against Phi Delta Theta members
all are related to the Oct. 15 party and are not
drug-related or associated with Courtney
Cantor's death.
DPS and AA PD reports on Courtney Cantor's
death, which were released yesterday, recon-
struct a progression of events from the night of
Oct. 15 through 60-80 interviews with witness-
es.
One person interviewed said Courtney
Cantor walked to the Chi Omega sorority
house with other pledges, arriving after 9
See CANTOR, Page 7A

Sporn. t45-9p.m.
C .tor eats d-- Cantor walks
ner in the. Mary to Chi Omega.
Markley cafete- sorority house
ria with other with other
students. sorority
pledges. All 44
pledges meet
9 p m. at the house.
Cantor and oth-
ers walk to Phi
Deft house, but 10 O.M.
then return to Sorority
the ChiOmega pledgesand
house because" members
carry4n prepara- watch "E.R."
tions are not then return to
done.Phi Delt house.
1/ ±p.'11:30 p.m.
actyivies end. Paty ctivities
Par begilns i novetothe
PhI Doifta theta first floor of the
basement.Phi Delt house.
Cantor is seen
drinking
12 tin. -1. a.mn
Cantor is seen,
dancing with a
mate. 2-2:30 a,m.
rat

LOUIS BROWN/Daily
Firemen work on fixing broken pipelines on Ashley Street yesterday after a roof collapsed from snow.
Buijlng roofcawve
Bi fro eavy snow

Marta Brill
ily Staff Reporter
The roof of a vacant commercial building at 525
S. Ashley St. collapsed yesterday afternoon.
"An overload of snow caused a structural
collapse," Ann Arbor Police Department Fire
marshal Scott Raybur said. The collapse trig-
gered a gas leak at the meter inside the house,
but the fire department effectively shut off the
meter.
The southern wall of the building continued to
vay dangerously, said Paul Ganz, manager of
corporate relations of Mich-Con., which handles
area gas leaks. Since the meter was connected to
this wall, officials feared the service line would
rupture and create a second and more serious gas
leak.
A typical gas system contains several compo-
nents. A fuel line runs inside the house and is
connected to the meter. On the other side, the
meter is attached to a service line that connects
to the distribution main that runs under the
street.
&The fuel main inside the house is carefully pres-
surized at 1/4 lbs., so the leak is not as severe as if

the service line were to rupture, said Ganz. The
service line might yield from 10 - 20 lbs. of pres-
sure, since it connects to the unpressurized and
larger distribution main.
In the frigid, 10-degree evening, fire officials
stood in snow-drifts surrounding the precarious
southwestern corner of the vacant building last
night. They were preparing to dig under the street
with a back-hoe and locate the service line for a "cut
and cap" in which they sever, then seal the line.
Ambulances waited on site for any potential explo-
sions.
The AAPD was contacted at 3:49 p.m. yester-
day about the collapse.
"The caller said they heard a scream," said
AAPD Operations Chief Bill Steele. The
scream was most likely the sound of the wood
creaking as the building collapsed, Steele
added, but a special team stood by to make
sure this was the case, and no one was inside.
There were no injuries in the incident, and near-
See ROOF, Page 2A
Inside: Ann Arbor incident is not isolated event.
See story, page 3A.

LSA may offer minor program

By Jaimle Winkler
Daily Staff Reporter
LSA students who feel their interests are too
broad for just one concentration, but think the
double concentration is just too much to han-
dle, may have help on the way.
A task force combining faculty and student
perspectives has come together to press the
LSA curriculum committee for a
major/minor program, aiming for a final vote
of approval possibly as early as the end of the
term.
"Having minors would enhance educa-
tion and our liberal arts experience," said
LSA junior John Naheedy at the LSA-

Task fore
pushes for full
LSA approval
Student Government meeting on Tuesday
night. Naheedy is a representative for
LSA-SG and the LSA Task Force on
Academic Minors.
Academic minors would also allow students
to say they took a structured minor, not just a

bunch of a classes from a specific department.
Naheedy said.
"I see our job as making a statement about
what students want," said Naheedy, "Not how
we go about it."
The recommendations made by the task
force include allowing students to elect one or
more academic minors and notation of the
minor on a student's transcript but not their
diploma.
Minors will require no less than half the
credits required for a major and majors and
minors, or multiple minors, will not be allowed
in the same department.
See MINORS, Page 2A

Sides brace for trial

Cafe manager removes
gay-friendly sticker
By Marta Brill front window by a former manager
Daily Staff Reporter port of a friend and Caribou cie

Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - On the eve of a
Senate trial that weighs, for the second
me in history, whether a president has
mmitted high crimes and misde-
meanors, the White House renewed its
argument that the evidence does not
support the charges.
Prosecutors from the House of
Representatives said President Clinton
had built a "purported defense" without

perjury and obstruction of justice.
"The important thing for me is to
spend as little time thinking about that
as possible and as much time working
on the issues we're here to discuss as
possible,".Clinton said. He met in the
Cabinet Room with labor leaders to dis-
cuss the economic and domestic policy
agenda he will present Tuesday in his
State of the Union message.
"They have their job to do in the

in su'-
nt who

Customers of Caribou Coffee on S. State Street
are complaining of a slight difference in the out-
ward appearance of the store, said LSA senior
Jen Wilson, who is also an assistant manager at
the coffee house.
For about a year and a half, the outside window

was having difficulties accepting his sex-
uality, Wilson said.
Kenny Lang, who has been the manager for
one month, initially removed the sticker
because he didn't "have enough window
space to advertise (his) friendliness to every
orntun." he,a id.Lng trans~ferred to Ann.

ff NW m f

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