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March 27, 1998 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1998-03-27

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- The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 27, 1998
Federal charges sought in shootings

AROUND THE NATION

the Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Justice Department officials
ire scouring the U.S. criminal code to determine
whether the two boys arrested in the Jonesboro
;chool shooting might serve longer sentences if
'hey are tried under some sort of federal law.
Mitchell Johnson, 13, and Andrew Golden, 11,
ire too young under Arkansas law to be tried as
idults and thus face lengthy prison terms. The
)oys are being held on murder charges in the
,hooting of middle-school teacher and four stu-
dents Tuesday.

Under the state's juvenile justice system, even
if convicted of murder, they are likely to be set
free when they turn 18.
"What we're doing is going through all the various
federal statutes to see what might be effective,"
Attorney General Janet Reno said yesterday at her
weekly news conference.
"At this point, with respect to both, they could be
charged under certain federal crimes as juveniles. The
question remains about how long the jurisdiction
might be continued and whether they could be
charged as adults," Reno said.

w -

ATTENTION

In most states, juveniles are often not sentenced
to a specific term but instead put under the juris-
diction of a court or a social service agency until
they reach a certain age or are declared rehabili-
tated.
Reno said Justice Department officials are work-
ing with Paula Casey, the U.S. Attorney in Little
Rock, and local prosecutors are trying to determine
whether prosecuting the boys as juveniles under
federal law would allow the boys to be jailed until
they are 21 years old, the maximum age that juve-
niles can be held.
HIS!HOLOCAUST
Continued from Page 1.
student Julie Mayfield, one ofthe readers
from the Alpha Phi sorority.
The warm, sunny weather brought
many people to the Diag yesterday.
Some of the people passing by offered a
few minutes of their time to read some of
the names.
"The Holocaust is very real to me,"
said LSA senior Adam Schlifke. "My
~ grandparents are both survivors. I like to
go to any Holocaust-related event that I
can."
The planning committee worked
with Hillel and raised funds for the
event through various sponsors and
donations.
The list of names was compiled by the
Holocaust Memorial Museum in Israel,
Yad Vashem.

Billing records surface in Foster's attic
WASHINGTON - In a bizarre discovery in the late Vincent Foster's att
Whitewater prosecutors have landed a second set of Hillary Rodham Clintoi
once-elusive law firm billing records, lawyers said yesterday.
The records have fewer handwritten notations and fewer pages but genera
contain the same information as the set belatedly found in the White House
1996, the lawyers said.
Nonetheless, the documents have become a fresh line of inquiry for grand
questioning in Arkansas, where prosecutors are pressing to wrap up their inves
gation of the first lady's legal work for a failed savings and loan owned by 1
Whitewater business partner.
"You're sitting in the grand jury and the prosecutors read you an entry abc
Mrs. Clinton from one set of billing records, question you about it, then they pi
up the other set and read other entries about other meetings," said one recent gra
jury witness who spoke only on condition of anonymity.
Prosecutors are trying to determine if Clinton, while a private Arkansas attorni
assisted a series of fraudulent S&L land transactions in the mid-1980s carried c
by her business partner, the late James McDougal. They're also investigati
whether she lied about her work under oath or tried to conceal documents i
Whitewater investigation that began during her husband's presidency.

40001'r

SENIOR
HISTORY
CONCENTRATORS

Colloquium sign-up
for tall term 1998 is
MONDAY, MARCH 30,
10:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. in
1 024i Tisch Hall.

New policy to alter
transplant protocol
WASHINGTON - The Clinton
administration yesterday announced a
far-reaching new policy on organ trans-
plantation, aiming to ensure that organs
go to the sickest patients first, regardless
of where they live.
The current system, a patchwork of
regional plans, more often than not
favors patients by geography rather
than medical necessity, said officials
from the Department of Health and
Human Services.
"This is about living or dying,"
Health and Human Services Secretary
Donna Shalala told reporters at a brief-
ing. "This is about where you happen to
live affecting whether you live or die.
People are dying unnecessarily - not
because they don't have health insur-
ance, not because they don't have
access to care, but because of where
they happen to live. We need a level
playing field for all patients."
While the medical technology and
survival rates of organ transplantation

byears, the need for organs has persiste
ly far exceeded the supply available I
donation.
It is estimated that 10 people eve
day die in the United States while wa
ing for a donated kidney, liver, hea
lung or other organ. 4
Famed Intel CEO
Grove to step dowr
SAN FRANCISCO--At the heart
the computer is a single silicon chip, t
microprocessor. And at the heart
Silicon Valley is the man who made t
lion's share of those chips, Intel Col
chief executive Andy Grove.
Now that's changing. G
announced yesterday that he is turnii
over the daily reins of the company
helped create to Craig Barrett. Gre
will remain as Intel's chair.
"This organization is fine-tuned 4
build computer chips) better than anyo
else;' Grove said yesterday. "And we'
done that without short cuts or compi
mises in values and operating style."

Fnday, March 27
Kuenzet Room, Michigan Union
Brian Lamb Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, C-SPAN
Reception follows

KEYNOTE
4-5:30 pm

8:30-9 am
PANEL ONE
9-11 am
PANEL TWO
11 am-1 pm
PANEL THREE
2:30-4 pm

Saturday, March 28
Anderson Room C&D, Michigan Union
REGISTRATION & COFFEE
Challenges to Industry
Leo Hindery President, Tele-Communications Inc. and Chief Executive Officer, InterMedia Partners
Eli Noam Director, Columbia Institute for Tele-Information, Columbia University
James Quello Former Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission
Transformations of Audience
Henry Jenkins Director, Comparative Media Studies Program, MIT
W. Russell Neuman Director, Program on Information and Society, University of Pennsylvania
Robert Kraut Professor of Social Psychology and Human-Computer Interaction, Carnegie-Mellon University
Possibilities for Community.
Phil Agre Associate Professor, UC-San Diego
Lee Sproull Professor, Management Information Systems, Boston University
Wanda Orlikowski Associate Professor of Information Technologies and Organization Studies, MIT

RELIGIOUS
SERVICES
AVAVAVAVA
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Episcopal (Anglican) Center
721 E. Huron St. (Behind Frieze Bild.)
SUNDAY JAZZ MASS 5:00PM W/
QUARTEX
Supper follows service
Retreats, Bible study, Service
Opportunities - Call 665-0606
The Rev Matthew Lawrence, Chaplain
KOREAN CHURCH OF ANN ARBOR
3301 Creek Dr. 971-9777
SUNDAY- 9:30 a.m. English
11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Korean
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lord of Light Lutheran Church
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.) 668-7622
SUN2AY: Worship at 10a.m.
THURS.: Faith and Fiction Group 7:00
John Rollefson, Campus Pastor
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
(Anglican Communion)
306 N. Division 663-0518
(2 blocks north and 1 block west
of intersection of Huron and State)
SUNDAY Eucharists-8am and loam
Adult Education-9am
Call for weekly service times,
to get on mailing list,
or if you have questions.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
1511 Washtenaw, Near Hill
Pastor Ed Krauss, 663-5560
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 a.m.
Wed. LENT Vespers, 7 p.m.

AROUND THE WORLD

Visit to South Africa
a presidential first
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -
Hailing South Africa's triumph over
apartheid as an "affirmation of humanity
at its best;' President Clinton yesterday
became the first American president to
set foot in this nation that until four years
ago was an international pariah.
Escorted into the chamber of South
Africa's Parliament Building yesterday
afternoon by President Nelson
Mandela, who through decades of
protest and imprisonment rallied the
world against his country's state-sanc-
tioned racism, Clinton told the National
Assembly that South Africa had trans-
formed itself from a source of outrage
into a source of inspiration.
"Now the courage and the imagina-
tion that created the new South Africa
and the principles that guide your con-
stitution inspire all of us to be animat-
ed by the belief that one day humanity
all over the world can at last be released
from the bonds of hatred and bigotry,
Clinton said.

Clinton, halfway through a six-nati
Africa tour, is being accompanied
South Africa by an unusually large U
delegation--a heavily African Americ
assemblage of some 50 politicians,
ness executives and civil rights act
who arrived here yesterday on an a
Force jet and will accompany the pre
dent in Cape Town and Johannesburg.
Yugoslavs adding t(
Kosovo police force
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia - Ignori
U.S. warnings, the governmer
Yugoslav President Slobod
Milosevic has deployed several hu
dred additional police to the rebellic
Kosovo province in what may sigr
the start of another offensive, Weste
officials said yesterday.
The United States and its Europe
allies have demanded that Milosei
withdraw special police forces from t
Albanian-majority province in southe
Serbia.
- Complled from Daily wire repor

I

MI

II

03 1-

rrnin

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NEWS JuAnt Mam*y Manghg yEt
EDITORS: Mae Hackett, Heather lamins, Jeffrey Koseeff, Chrfs MetinkaO
STAFF: Melissa Andrejak, Reilly Brennan, JodI S, Cohen, Gerard Cohe.wtnaud, Greg Co, Rachel Edelman, Jeff Ek a, Margene Erken,
Megan Exey, Trevor Gardner, Eun Holmes, Steve Horwi . Hong Un, Pete Meyers, William Na, Chrtine M. PaLk, Lee Palmer. Katie Picna,
Susan T. Port, Dibe Rab, Ellane Raik, Anupams Reddy, Peter RomerFtedanen, Josh Roeserlatt, Melanie Sonoran, Nka Schulte, Cady
Southworth, Mike Sphn, Sam Stavis, Jason StOffer, Caes Van Hatee, WIl Weiswt, HeatherWWin, Matin Wright, Jennifer Yachnn.
CALENDAR: Katie Plone,
EDITORIAL Jack Se mNk
ASSOCIATE EDITOR. Sarah Lockyar.
STAFF Lea Frost, Kaamran Hafeez, Erie Hochstadt, Scott Hunter, Jason Korb, Yki MKuniyuki, Sarah Lemire, Ern Marsh, James Miller, Aaro
Rich, Joshua Rich; Stephen Sarkozy, Megan Schimpf, Paul Sevile, David Wallace, Josh White, Matt Wimsatt,
SPORTS Jnm Ros, Managing
EDITORS: Chris Farah, Shat Raju, Mark Snyder, Dan Stlltman.
STAFF: Drew Beaver, TJ. Berka, Josh Borkin, Evan Braunstein, Nicholas J. Cotsonika, Dave DenHerder, Chris Duprey, Jason Emeott, Jordan
Field, Mark Francescutti, Rick Freeman, John Friedberg, Alan Goldenbach, James Goldstein, Rick Harpster, Kim Hart. Josh Kleinbaum,
Vaughn R. Klug, Chad Kujala, Andy Latack, John Leroi, Fred Link, BJ. Luria, Praney Reddy, Kevin Rosenfield, Danielle Rumore, Tracy
Sandier, Nita Srivastava, Uma Subramanian, Jacob Wheeler.
ARTS Bryan Lark, Kristin L , Edit
WEEKEND, ETC. EDITORS: Emily Lambert. Elizabeth Lucas; Associate Editor: Christopher Tkacryk
SUB-EDITORS: Brian Cohen (Music), Christopher Tkaczyk (Performing and Fine Arts), Jos w Pedersn (Film), Jessica Eaton (Books), Michal Galoway
(TV/New Media).
STAFF: Joanne Alnajjar, Amy Barber, Matthew Barrett, Colin Bartos, Caryn Burtt, Anitha Chalam, Gabe Fajuri, Laura Flyer, Geordy
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Ryan Posly, Aaron Rennie, Aaron Rich, Joshua Rich, Deveron Q. Sanders, Corinne Schneider, Erin Diane Schwartz, Jessica Simmons,
Anders Smith-Lindall, Cara Spindler, Prashant Tamaskar, Ted Watts, JuQuan Williams,;Curtis Zimmerman.
PHOTO Margaret Myers, Warren ZInn, Ed
STAFF: Allison Canter, Louis Brown, Mallory S.E. Floyd, Joy Jacobs, Jessica Johnson, John Kraft, Dana Unnane, Emily Nathan, Nathan Ruffer,
Stillman, Paul Talanian, Addna Yugovich.
ONLINE Chris Farah,
STAFF: Mark Francescutti, Marquina ilev, Elizabeth Lucas, Adam Pollock.
GRAPHICS Jonathan WeltE
STAFF: Alex Hogg, Michelle McCombs, Jordan Young.
BUSIESSSTAF Megan ~ooe, BsinssaMnag

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