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September 05, 1997 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-09-05

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The Michigan Daily - Friday,September 5, 1997 - 11

nsurpassed Catherine Wheel rolls through
indy City to showcase new 'Adam & Eve'

WANTED
h L.i~r 1 ame: Jewel
Occupation: Pop superst
Under suspicion of pleasing the
masses with her lovely voice andl°r
catchy songs, including "You Wer-,w
Meant For Me" and "Who Will
Save Your Soul." Suspect also a
obsessively, raving that she'd fik
to be "near you always." Catch hr,
in the act tonight at her sold our
Meadowbrook show. Suspect is
armed with an acoustic guitar.
:n 4aix'-

By Colin Bartos
Daily Airts.Writer
Catherine Wheel is like the little
known ballplayer on the team, who
ses everyday yet receives no recog-
n. The British music superstars,
like Oasis, Blur and Bush, undeserved-
ly get the big salaries and draw the big
crowds, while artisti- _
cally superior bands
like Radiohead and A
Catherine Wheel sit Cal
in the =background. '
Its about time
Catherine Wheel got
its spot on the All-

ing the thick, layered textures live on
stage. The dynamic, acoustic "Future
Boy" sounded crystal clear as
Dickinson's voice cut through each
audience member. The girls in the audi-
ence swooned as Dickinson poured his
heart out from beginning to end.
The harder-rocking "Delicious" got
the crowd into the
mix, and provided
E VI E Wa nice contrast to
ierine Wheel the following
The Metro mellower offer-
Chicago, IL ings "Broken
Nose,' "Phantom
Aug. 29, 1997 Of The American

m
k1
ith

and say, 'good luck."' Dickinson then
left the stage for a small interlude.
Retaking the stage for its first encore,
Catherine Wheel started right into
"Thunderbird," from "Adam & Eve,"
followed by the beautiful "Here Comes
The Fat Controller." The crowd looked
for more classic material, and was treat-
ed to "I Want To Touch You." From
there, Dickinson said, "Au revoir," as
the band ended the set with "Goodbye,"
the last track to be played from "Adam
& Eve." The new album had gone over
well from end to end, but Catherine
Wheel was intent on going the whole
nine.
The band took the stage yet again to
a tremendous thunder and started into

its signature "Black Metallic." The 10-
minute version sounded thicker and
more intense than I can ever remember,
and sent the crowd into a frenzy. CW
then ended with two driving numbers
from "Happy Days": "Little Muscle"
and "Waydown." The two-hour set
seemed so complete, yet seemed to
have passed in no time.
The songs from "Adam & Eve"
sounded very thorough, although it
seems like they need time to take on a
life of their own and grow like the older
material. Overall, Catherine Wheel
proved once again why it should be
reigning kings of the British wave and
why no one should miss them when
they come to Detroit later this month.

team. Moth
atherine Wheel is currently Solituda." Drummer Neil
embarking . on a full-scale North bassist Dave Hawes silently
American tour. The tour coincides with song delicately along.
the Aug; 26 release of Catherine seemed content with the n
Wheel's latest adventure, "Adam & yet yearned for older
Eve." Six select cities were chosen as Catherine Wheel did not dis
special spots where CW would show- moved right into "Crank"
case the new album live in its entirety. "Chrome." "Crank" m
Since Detroit obviously was not one of "Texture " from 1991' s "Fe
the chosen few, Chicago had to suffice. ing which guitarist Brian I
*he -show was held at the Metro, to thrash about. The old sc
which is about half the size of the clubs new life with the addition
CW normally plays. The crowd was boards and new dimension
filled with Catherine Wheel faithful, used on "Adam & Eve."
who were extremely anxious to see this Catherine Wheel returne
iid eorm its new material, and CW album with "Satellite' one
(114 ndtiisappoint. upbeat tunes of the set. '
1 ki the stage in a roar, lead vocal- 1995's "Happy Days;' fo
guitarist Rob Dickinson blended nicely into the n
1du1chUimmediately into "Intro" from Dreaming," from the r
ihe nev lbum. The band proceeded to Dickinson added his solo
thoIigh the entire A-side of"Adam end of "For Dreaming," d
* .!'XThe album itself is utterly he said he plans to make an
a~~ina and extremely complex, but up loose ends with a
CFsyed to have no trouble recreat- "labeled (him) as an inse
Net-so-good 'Beer Book'
w ,8 t quench readers' th
Good Beer Book" often re
-I K extremely dry textbook or
Cbntlmeit from Page 10 subject.
The listings at the back n
The Good Beer Book ful for finding good ba
Timothy Harper and Garrett Oliver around the country if you're
ing and in dire need of gettil
Berkeley Books an unfamiliar place. The
** brewing a variety of beers v
ful for those motivated enoi
Especially in college, beer is essen- his own. But otherwise,
ti to the sustenance of life. All around speaks too technically to a
i, television ads, billboards, bars and that doesn't really want the
liquor-stores to name a few all suggest "The Good Beer Book'
that beer is indeed, an integral part of book if a person has a drivir
our society and our daily lives. learning more about beer ai
Butwhile most people just ignorant- ing of beer. But for anyoi
ly enjoy the intake of beer, Timothy wants to relish the taste and
Herper- and Garrett Oliver attempt to this book will read mor
educate the public about all aspects of Boring Beer Book."
beer. In their book, "The Good Beer
Bok," Harper and Oliver tell you all
*ee is to know about beer.
They begin by giving the entire his-
tory of beer, citing the possibility that
"rain soaked some loaves of bread and
then aitborne yeast was blown into the
crude inash ... some passing cave man
(or wolfan) was lured by the intoxicat-
ing aroma, tasted the crude brew and
thei clanged the course of human his-
tory by offering it around the cave.'
They even bring up the possibility that
Noah may have taken some beer onto
* Ark. From ancient times until more
modern times, readers are told how
mnalt, water, yeast and hops developed
into anlndustry, and that famous brew-
ers ineldded William Shakespeare,
William Penn and George Washington.
Thebook continues with a descrip-
tion of the processes involved with
Making beer, and different classifica-
tions of beer. Readers learn the differ-
Akes bwenlagers and ales, as well
the different styles of each classifi-
cation from around the world. The
guide then teaches a person how to han-
dle beertto prevent skunky beer, as well
the optimal conditions for serving this [
ambrosia. Skunky beer, also called
lightstick beer, is beer that has been
exposed to too much light, particularly
direct'sunlight. This condition particu-
larly affects pale lagers and other light-
colored beer in green or clear bottles.
; The Good Beer Book" then contin-
ues with-recipes that use beer, recipes
for brewing beer and a listing of which
beer goes well with which foods. For
example;' porters and stouts go well

with #raw shellfish, amber lager and
pale ale'go well with barbeque, and
Belgiah fruit ales go well with fruit
pies.
The book finally winds up with a cat-
g of breweries, bars and pubs from
ound the world. In Ann Arbor,
AshleyPub is cited as a proprietor of
good beer.
furthermore, throughout "The Good
Beer Book,' the authors include pro-
files of.,people who have started up ..
their own microbreweries, run beer
publications, or who have in some way

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