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April 02, 1997 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1997-04-02

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- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, April 2, 1997

NATION/WORLD

i

MSA
Continued from Page 1
approved to appoint SNRE Rep. Karie
Morgan as MSA treasurer.
Newly elected LSA Rep. Jason Korb
proposed a resolution that urges admin-
istrators to extend the hours of the
Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library.
"What this does is basically ask the
library administration to extend their
hours by at least an hour," Korb said.
The assembly then passed a resolu-
tion, which was proposed by LSA Rep.
Ian Lucas, and states that MSA supports
tonight's March for Homeless Rights.
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The march is sponsored by the
Homeless Power Union and the National
Women's Rights Organizing Coalition.
"Homelessness is a problem in Ann
Arbor and I think it's MSA's job to repre-
sent students' concerns - this is obvi-
ously a concern of many students," he
said.
Both Rose and outgoing MSA Vice
President Probir Mehta said they pub-
licly thank many people who have
shaped their MSA experiences and
those who have supported them.
"I'm so happy to be a part of the
maize and blue tradition and I'm so
thankful that I decided to come to
school here," Rose said.
Rose said she also wants to start
focusing on aspects of her personal life.
"I'll definitely be active in some dif-
ferent student groups," Rose said. "I
want to get back into sports, try out for
the crew team and resume dating:'
Mehta said he looks forward "to being
a student again and raising my GPA."
"1 have a sense of optimism and no
regrets.' Mehta said. "I wish the new
members of the assembly the best and
hope that they will shatter the image
ghat MSA doesn't keep its promises."

Four Palestinians
die amid peace talks

The Washington Post
JERUSALEM - A continuing swell
of communal violence left four
Palestinians dead yesterday - two in
what were described as botched suicide
attacks, two more under Israeli army
fire - amid warnings from both sides
that the survival of their deadlocked
peace negotiations is in doubt.
It was the deadliest of 13 straight
days of street clashes since Israel broke
ground for a new Jewish neighborhood
in the traditionally Palestinian part of
East Jerusalem.
The confrontations between Israeli
occupation troops and stone-throwing
Arab youths, controlled with varying
effort and success by Palestinian police,
have begun to look increasingly like
durable features of a new phase in the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
Twin explosions in the Gaza Strip,
carried out minutes apart at Gaza's two
principal sites of Jewish settlement,
killed only the apparent bombers,
Israeli authorities reported. But taken
together with a March 21 bomb in Tel
Aviv, which killed three Israeli women,

the attacks suggested to many Israelis
that a year-long silence by Islamic
extremists has been broken in earnest.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
pressed his claim again that Yasser
Arafat, president of the Palestinian
Authority, consented to a resumption of
terror attacks, saying the "terrorist
organizations ... continue to understand
they have a green light from the
Palestinian Authority to perpetrate their
savagery." He said that "if peace is to
survive" Arafat must tell Islamic mili-
tants unambiguously to halt the attacks
and take decisive steps to prevent them.
Arafat and his lieutenants promoted
a radically different account of the
Gaza explosions. They said the second
of the two incidents - outside the
Jewish settlement of Kfar Darom, in the
center of the Gaza Strip, 10 miles
southwest of Gaza City - was not a
suicide bombing, but an unprovoked
Israeli attack on innocent Palestinians.
"This morning an Israeli jeep opened
fire on a taxi in which one was killed and
five were injured," Arafat said at a meet-
ing of international donors in Gaza City.

Crackdown on immigrants stirs fears
WASHINGTON - A sweeping immigration reform law designed to shore up U.S.
borders and expedite deportations took effect at 35 minutes past midnight yesterday
here after judges, lawyers and advocates battled into the night over its implementation.
Immigrants across the United States awoke baffled and scared as rumors of mass
deportation swirled in their circles.
"Fear and confusion are sweeping through immigrant and refugee commu
ties," said Soya Jung of the Alliance for Immigrant and Refugee Justice
Washington state. "This is the harshest piece of immigration legislation our nation
has seen in more than 50 years. It's an unjust law and we can't take it lying down."
Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said the statute is being phased
in as planned, and tried to reassure frightened illegal immigrants it would cause no
mass deportations or workplace roundups, as many have dreaded.
"There is absolutely no truth to the rumor and falsehood that the INS has
planned and defined massive deportation proceedings," said INS spokesperson
Brian Jordan. "This is going to be a gradual process. It's going to take time."
The most sweeping overhaul of its kind in a decade, the law paves the way for
physical barriers at the borders - including a triple fence in San Diego - more
border patrol staff, better INS equipment and an accelerated deportation proc
that limits the legal challenges an immigrant can make.

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Expanding economy
may up interest rates
WASHINGTON - New figures
released yesterday show the U.S. econ-
omy is continuing to expand at such a
strong pace that the Federal Reserve is
likely to raise interest rates again next
month unless there are clear signs that
growth is slowing, financial analysts
said.
The surge in growth, which began
late last year and surprised both Fed
officials and private forecasters by
continuing undiminished into this
year, is strong enough that it could
soon drive the nation's jobless rate
below 5 percent for the first time in
nearly a quarter-century, the analysts
warned.
"The economy is really strong," Fed
governor Laurence Meyer, who won
forecasting awards before joining the
Fed board last year, said in an inter-
view. "This is not a fluke."
Fed officials, concerned that falling
unemployment could cause wages to
rise much more rapidly and lead to

higher inflation, raised a key overnight
interest rate last week.
Meyer would not comment directly
on what the Fed might do at its next
policymaking session May 20, but an
increasing number of financial analysts
are convinced the Fed will raise rates
again unless growth looks like *
slowing.
Judge to review files
in Unabomber case
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -A federal
judge yesterday ordered prosecutors in
the Unabomber murder case to allow
him to examine law enforcement i
that attorneys for suspect Theod
Kaczynski contend should be thrown
out.
At a hearing, U.S. Magistrate
Gregory Hollows told attorneys for
both sides that he will review the
disputed documents in private and
decide later in the month which, if
any, will be handed over to the
defense.

ROUND THE WORD~~
ix

Pakistan repeals
controversial law
NEW -DELHI, India - Pakistan's
parliament unanimously repealed yes-
terday a controversial constitutional
provision that allowed the country's
president to unilaterally remove prime
ministers from office.
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif relied
on his two-thirds majority, the largest in
Pakistan's history, to push through par-
liament in one day legislation to revoke
a measure used three times in the last
decade - twice to remove Benazir
Bhutto from power and once to oust
Sharif himself. The presidential prerog-
ative, which Bhutto and others had
denounced as undemocratic, was grant-
ed to Pakistan's indirectly elected pres-
ident in 1985 during the military dicta-
torship of Mohammed Zia ul-Haq.
Supporters described repeal of those
powers as strengthening the prime min-
ister's office and eliminating a major
source of political instability that has
prevented each of Pakistan's elected
prime ministers from completing a

five-year term. Such presidential pow-
ers were last used in November to dis-
miss Bhutto, who was also removed in
1990. Sharif was ousted in 1993, was
restored to office by the Supreme Co
and resigned soon afterward.
Southeast Europe
plagued by storms
BUCHAREST, Romania - Rain and
late-season snowstorms have knocked
out power to scores of villages across
Romania and Bulgaria, toppling trees
and halting road, rail and river traffic.
Seven people were hurt in accide
on icy highways in Bulgaria's capit,
Sofia, the nation's state news agency
reported yesterday.
Strong winds downed trees, which fell
on tracks and blocked trains in moan-
tains north of Romania's capital,
Bucharest, Romanian national radio
reported. Snow and fog also closed a
highway in Bulgaria, shutting down a
main route from Romania to Turkey and
Greece over the Balkan mountains.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports.

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Heading Home'
for Summer?

Get ahead of thegame t fall.
At Oakland University, you can choose from more than 600 spring or summer courses offered at our
beautiful and convenient campus - many during the evening and on Saturday. You can transfer the
credits back -to your home institution in the fall. For a complete schedule of classes and application,
contact the Office of Admissions and Enrollment Management today.
by phone: 1400433-1995. by fax: 1-810-370-4462,
by e-mail: ouinfo@oakland.edu
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